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Thread: Decriminalizing domestic violence

  1. #1
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Decriminalizing domestic violence

    For Svetlana, a 35-year-old mother of three from Moscow, domestic violence is a family affair.

    Her ex-husband repeatedly threatened to take their son away and beat her mother. Last spring, it was Svetlana's turn.

    “He cornered me in our flat in Moscow for several hours and beat me,” she remembers. “He tried to rape me and said he would pour acid over me.”

    Even though months have passed since the attack, the agitation in her voice is palpable. Especially because, after she reported the incident to the police, her ex-husband got away with just a fine.

    In Russia, domestic violence is often treated as a private matter and Svetlana’s case is far from unique, says Mari Davtyan, a women’s rights lawyer.

    But nine months after Russia decriminalized domestic violence — to the great alarm of rights defenders — women like Svetlana have even less protection. “Victims like her are now totally ignored,” Davtyan told The Moscow Times.

    Family dynamics

    In February, Russian President Vladimir Putin approved a bill to downgrade "battery within families" — assaults which do not result in "substantial bodily harm" — from a criminal to an administrative offense.

    Supporters of the new legislation argued that treating battery as a criminal offense encroached into family affairs and that parents could risk jail time for emotional spats or disciplining their children.

    Under the new regulations, first-time offenders can be handed a fine of 30,000 rubles ($500), detained for up to 15 days or made to do community service. Criminal charges are only brought against offenders if beatings take place more than once a year.

    Around 40,000 Russians are victims of domestic violence every year, according to official Interior Ministry statistics. But the real figures are likely much higher since many women — the majority of the victims — don't report abuse to the police, Davtyan says.

    The softening of the rules means the difference between real and reported violence has grown, she adds. Victims don’t have access to police protection while their complaint is being processed and they have lost their right to appeal police negligence in handling their cases.

    According to Anna Donich, the head of a crisis center for women in Irkutsk, just two percent of domestic violence victims see their attackers brought before a judge. Since February, she says, that number has dropped further and it is getting harder for victims to get the authorities on their side.

    “Police are asking victims for more proof,” Donich says. “Only female police officers end up helping them.”

    Tatyana Dmitriyeva, a social worker at the government-run family center in Tomsk in southern Russia, also says women are experiencing resistance from authorities.

    “Recently one woman told us she had complained about her case to the police four times,” she says. “All her applications were rejected.”

    Even police themselves have said that the recent legislation has made their work more complicated.

    For the past six months, volunteers from the Russian Association of Women's Organizations have questioned 120 policemen throughout the country.

    “Most of them, almost 90 percent, say the decriminalization of abuse hasn’t made their work easier,” says Davtyan, the lawyer. Another 89 percent said the best option would be to reclassify domestic violence as a criminal offense, she said, citing the same poll.

    Sending a message

    Marina Pisklakova-Parker, the head of the Anna Center NGO, which provides support to victims of domestic abuse, says the new law has also changed the general attitude towards violence in Russian society.

    “For aggressors, the decriminalization was seen as a message that violence is acceptable,” she says. “Victims took it as a message that it would be harder to get help.”

    Svetlana, from Moscow, experienced this psychological switch firsthand. “After the rules changed, my ex-husband began saying there is no way I could stop him, and he became more violent," she says.

    Some women's centers, like the center in Tomsk, say they have been receiving fewer calls through their emergency helpline.

    Women are growing increasingly disillusioned that anyone will come to their defense, says Dmitriyeva. “Women are slowly losing hope” she told The Moscow Times. "They’ve stopped even asking for help. Decriminalization may have reinforced that tendency.”
    More: Nine Months After New Domestic Violence Law, Russian Women Still Struggle

    Russians do, very much, believe that government should not intrude into private family life of citizens... Unfortunately, Putin decided to accommodate the more extreme side of this belief. As a result, women suffer...
    Last edited by The Man; 24th November 2017 at 07:02 AM.

  2. #2
    Veteran Member cpicturetaker12's Avatar
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    We've DECRIMINALIZED it here too. We just have cover stories about how serious we take it!
    Thanks from The Man

  3. #3
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpicturetaker12 View Post
    We've DECRIMINALIZED it here too. We just have cover stories about how serious we take it!
    That's very sad... Whole world is sliding backwards...
    Thanks from MeBelle

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    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
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    And if Svetlana gets a gun to protect herself and actually uses it on the guy, she'll mostly likely be sent to prison. Bad enough to encourage domestic abuse; even worse to prohibit fighting back against it.
    Thanks from The Man, MeBelle and Friday13

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    Veteran Member Chief's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpicturetaker12 View Post
    We've DECRIMINALIZED it here too. We just have cover stories about how serious we take it!
    That's not right. I know from a Navy standpoint that if you have been convicted of domestic violence, you won't be issued a weapon, you'll lose your clearance, and likely be discharged. If you are convicted of a domestic violence misdemeanor you are also ineligible to purchase firearms. That doesn't mean the system works 100% of the time, but its far from decriminalized.
    Thanks from The Man, Ian Jeffrey and Friday13

  6. #6
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Jeffrey View Post
    And if Svetlana gets a gun to protect herself and actually uses it on the guy, she'll mostly likely be sent to prison. Bad enough to encourage domestic abuse; even worse to prohibit fighting back against it.
    That's true. Actually, I read that more than half of women imprisoned in Russia today are serving time for defending themselves (or their children, in some cases) from domestic abuse...
    Thanks from Friday13

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    Spock of Vulcan Ian Jeffrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    That's true. Actually, I read that more than half of women imprisoned in Russia today are serving time for defending themselves (or their children, in some cases) from domestic abuse...
    What a wonderful place.
    Thanks from The Man and Friday13

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    Moderator MeBelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    That's true. Actually, I read that more than half of women imprisoned in Russia today are serving time for defending themselves (or their children, in some cases) from domestic abuse...
    That's horrible!
    Thanks from The Man

  9. #9
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    That's very sad... Whole world is sliding backwards...
    In the US, a man can kill a woman and walk away a free man. It just has to be an accident. Women don't matter much in the US either...it is just more subtle.
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCProf View Post
    In the US, a man can kill a woman and walk away a free man. It just has to be an accident. Women don't matter much in the US either...it is just more subtle.
    But isn't that also true if a man accidentally kills another man? It's not like they do a victim gender check before deciding whether or not he's guilty of something. I really don't see what you are suggesting. That said, I'm listening and maybe there are some other examples that will make it more clear to me.
    Thanks from The Man

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