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Thread: D-Day was today

  1. #11
    Veteran Member Devil505's Avatar
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    Longest day was written by Cornelius Ryan (SP) who also wrote A Bridge To Far.
    Thanks from Macduff and Hollywood

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Sampson Simpson View Post
    Oh, you have to see it. I'm assuming you saw Saving Private Ryan? I tried to watch the Longest Day, can't, the effects were so cheesy, I had to turn it off.

    Band of Brothers is fantastic. Follows the 82nd airborne from training through the end of the war. Must watch. The Pacific is good as well, but not as good as Band of Brothers.
    Agree about The Pacific.

    I hoped it would be as good as Band of Brothers.

    My expectations were too high.

    It was good, but not in the same ballpark.
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  3. #13
    Retired Admin Macduff's Avatar
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    "We're here to mark that day in history when the Allied peoples joined in battle to reclaim this continent to liberty. For four long years, much of Europe had been under a terrible shadow. Free nations had fallen, Jews cried out in the camps, millions cried out for liberation. Europe was enslaved, and the world prayed for its rescue. Here in Normandy the rescue began. Here the Allies stood and fought against tyranny in a giant undertaking unparalleled in human history.

    We stand on a lonely, windswept point on the northern shore of France. The air is soft, but forty years ago at this moment, the air was dense with smoke and the cries of men, and the air was filled with the crack of rifle fire and the roar of cannon. At dawn, on the morning of the 6th of June 1944, 225 Rangers jumped off the British landing craft and ran to the bottom of these cliffs. Their mission was one of the most difficult and daring of the invasion: to climb these sheer and desolate cliffs and take out the enemy guns. The Allies had been told that some of the mightiest of these guns were here and they would be trained on the beaches to stop the Allied advance.

    The Rangers looked up and saw the enemy soldiers -- at the edge of the cliffs shooting down at them with machine-guns and throwing grenades. And the American Rangers began to climb. They shot rope ladders over the face of these cliffs and began to pull themselves up. When one Ranger fell, another would take his place. When one rope was cut, a Ranger would grab another and begin his climb again. They climbed, shot back, and held their footing. Soon, one by one, the Rangers pulled themselves over the top, and in seizing the firm land at the top of these cliffs, they began to seize back the continent of Europe. Two hundred and twenty-five came here. After two days of fighting only ninety could still bear arms.

    Behind me is a memorial that symbolizes the Ranger daggers that were thrust into the top of these cliffs. And before me are the men who put them there.

    These are the boys of Pointe du Hoc. These are the men who took the cliffs. These are the champions who helped free a continent. These are the heroes who helped end a war.
    Gentlemen, I look at you and I think of the words of Stephen Spender's poem. You are men who in your 'lives fought for life...and left the vivid air signed with your honor'...
    Forty summers have passed since the battle that you fought here. You were young the day you took these cliffs; some of you were hardly more than boys, with the deepest joys of life before you. Yet you risked everything here. Why? Why did you do it? What impelled you to put aside the instinct for self-preservation and risk your lives to take these cliffs? What inspired all the men of the armies that met here? We look at you, and somehow we know the answer. It was faith, and belief; it was loyalty and love.

    The men of Normandy had faith that what they were doing was right, faith that they fought for all humanity, faith that a just God would grant them mercy on this beachhead or on the next. It was the deep knowledge -- and pray God we have not lost it -- that there is a profound moral difference between the use of force for liberation and the use of force for conquest. You were here to liberate, not to conquer, and so you and those others did not doubt your cause. And you were right not to doubt.

    You all knew that some things are worth dying for. One's country is worth dying for, and democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man. All of you loved liberty. All of you were willing to fight tyranny, and you knew the people of your countries were behind you."
    Thanks from BigLeRoy

  4. #14
    Veteran Member TNVolunteer73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil505 View Post
    Great battle scenes but didn't capture much of Overlord's scope.

    Never saw it.
    If you have not seen Band of Brothers I recommend it highly it is a 9 part series of the 502nd company (Easy Company) of the 101st from Boot Camp to post VE Day.

    Covers D-Day Market Garden( bridge too far) Bastone, liberation of a Concentration camp

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0185906...f_=tt_eps_sn_1
    Thanks from Devil505, Macduff and Ian Jeffrey

  5. #15
    Veteran Member TNVolunteer73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Sampson Simpson View Post
    Oh, you have to see it. I'm assuming you saw Saving Private Ryan? I tried to watch the Longest Day, can't, the effects were so cheesy, I had to turn it off.

    Band of Brothers is fantastic. Follows the 82nd airborne from training through the end of the war. Must watch. The Pacific is good as well, but not as good as Band of Brothers.

    BOB is the 101st not 82nd airborne The battling Bastards of Bastone
    Thanks from Macduff and Ian Jeffrey

  6. #16
    Veteran Member bajisima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RNG View Post
    It just struck me that for the first year ever in my experience I had read nothing, heard nothing and seen nothing related to this fact. Just wow.

    Very unfortunate, it is.

    In 1973 I visited the coast of Belgium, was walking along and came upon a series of old German bunkers. You could climb into them.

    I am one of the least empathetic people in the world in terms of being affected by many outside inputs. I don't cry in sad movies and so on.

    But dammit, sitting there looking out the gun slits just made my guts wretch at those poor bastards that had to hit the beaches.

    This wasn't a beach that was used on D-Day but was the same. And it was a moving experience.
    I give FOX news here a lot of credit. They have live coverage over there today and have special reports all day about this. I think there is a special tonight as well. The VFW here always watches it.

    Veterans, families mark 74 years since Allied D-Day landings | Fox News
    D-Day remembered: The day we knew we were going to win | Fox News
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  7. #17
    Moderator HayJenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Macduff View Post
    "We're here to mark that day in history when the Allied peoples joined in battle to reclaim this continent to liberty. For four long years, much of Europe had been under a terrible shadow. Free nations had fallen, Jews cried out in the camps, millions cried out for liberation. Europe was enslaved, and the world prayed for its rescue. Here in Normandy the rescue began. Here the Allies stood and fought against tyranny in a giant undertaking unparalleled in human history.

    We stand on a lonely, windswept point on the northern shore of France. The air is soft, but forty years ago at this moment, the air was dense with smoke and the cries of men, and the air was filled with the crack of rifle fire and the roar of cannon. At dawn, on the morning of the 6th of June 1944, 225 Rangers jumped off the British landing craft and ran to the bottom of these cliffs. Their mission was one of the most difficult and daring of the invasion: to climb these sheer and desolate cliffs and take out the enemy guns. The Allies had been told that some of the mightiest of these guns were here and they would be trained on the beaches to stop the Allied advance.

    The Rangers looked up and saw the enemy soldiers -- at the edge of the cliffs shooting down at them with machine-guns and throwing grenades. And the American Rangers began to climb. They shot rope ladders over the face of these cliffs and began to pull themselves up. When one Ranger fell, another would take his place. When one rope was cut, a Ranger would grab another and begin his climb again. They climbed, shot back, and held their footing. Soon, one by one, the Rangers pulled themselves over the top, and in seizing the firm land at the top of these cliffs, they began to seize back the continent of Europe. Two hundred and twenty-five came here. After two days of fighting only ninety could still bear arms.

    Behind me is a memorial that symbolizes the Ranger daggers that were thrust into the top of these cliffs. And before me are the men who put them there.

    These are the boys of Pointe du Hoc. These are the men who took the cliffs. These are the champions who helped free a continent. These are the heroes who helped end a war.
    Gentlemen, I look at you and I think of the words of Stephen Spender's poem. You are men who in your 'lives fought for life...and left the vivid air signed with your honor'...
    Forty summers have passed since the battle that you fought here. You were young the day you took these cliffs; some of you were hardly more than boys, with the deepest joys of life before you. Yet you risked everything here. Why? Why did you do it? What impelled you to put aside the instinct for self-preservation and risk your lives to take these cliffs? What inspired all the men of the armies that met here? We look at you, and somehow we know the answer. It was faith, and belief; it was loyalty and love.

    The men of Normandy had faith that what they were doing was right, faith that they fought for all humanity, faith that a just God would grant them mercy on this beachhead or on the next. It was the deep knowledge -- and pray God we have not lost it -- that there is a profound moral difference between the use of force for liberation and the use of force for conquest. You were here to liberate, not to conquer, and so you and those others did not doubt your cause. And you were right not to doubt.

    You all knew that some things are worth dying for. One's country is worth dying for, and democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man. All of you loved liberty. All of you were willing to fight tyranny, and you knew the people of your countries were behind you."
    True hero's all of them..

    Too bad apparently Trump doesn't understand how crucial our allies were to us during WW2. Now he is about throwing most of the them under the bus.

  8. #18
    Retired Admin Macduff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HayJenn View Post
    True hero's all of them..

    Too bad apparently Trump doesn't understand how crucial our allies were to us during WW2. Now he is about throwing most of the them under the bus.
    Can we go one thread without this?
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  9. #19
    Veteran Member Devil505's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Macduff View Post
    Can we go one thread without this?
    Hard to be patriotic with Trump posing as a legitimate Prez

  10. #20
    Veteran Member TNVolunteer73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil505 View Post
    Hard to be patriotic with Trump posing as a legitimate Prez
    Not hard for a person that loves the republic I thought Obama was a dumbass, but he was my president.

    Why did you have to bring politics into this thread meant to honor veterans of and those that died on D-Day

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