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Thread: What did the British refer to "americans" as prior to 1776????

  1. #41
    New Member Detective Mike Logan's Avatar
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    sorry that was some grade A sexism on my part. don't know why I assumed u were a man. as the americans say.... my bad.

    you're right AF. dunno why nightswimmer is getting so defensive
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  2. #42
    Junior Member allegoricalfact's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Detective Mike Logan View Post
    sorry that was some grade A sexism on my part. don't know why I assumed u were a man. as the americans say.... my bad.

    you're right AF. dunno why nightswimmer is getting so defensive

    I don't care, I have no probs with 'sexism' 'vive la difference' and all that, I am neither a feminist nor a fan of PC. How can we know which sex each other are unless we tell each other on these anon affairs?

    Nah Knight gets bees in his bonnet sometimes --- specially before coffee, the darling man.

  3. #43
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by allegoricalfact View Post
    Knight why are you being so defensive --- the question is one of History not a definition of what any of us are but - in fact, what were the peoples who had settled in the Americas called, before they were an Independent State(s) or a United States of America, by the Europeans --- it is a point of interest from a historical pov.

    I merely find the oversimplification of history into stereotypical caricatures to be somewhat distasteful. Even among the British Colonies in America, not everyone who was here came here from Britain.
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  4. #44
    Junior Member allegoricalfact's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NightSwimmer View Post
    I merely find the oversimplification of history into stereotypical caricatures to be somewhat distasteful. Even among the British Colonies in America, not everyone who was here came here from Britain.

    OK xxx It is an interesting question though.

    I mean what were the English before anyone else found us? People I suppose

  5. #45
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by allegoricalfact View Post
    OK xxx It is an interesting question though.

    I mean what were the English before anyone else found us? People I suppose

    It's interesting enough to consider the evolution of the American territories into what eventually became the United States. As for how King George referred to Americans at the time of the British Colonies, I honestly couldn't care less. When I was studying the history of the American Revolution in school, I did often wonder how British textbooks covered the event.

  6. #46
    Junior Member allegoricalfact's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NightSwimmer View Post
    It's interesting enough to consider the evolution of the American territories into what eventually became the United States. As for how King George referred to Americans at the time of the British Colonies, I honestly couldn't care less. When I was studying the history of the American Revolution in school, I did often wonder how British textbooks covered the event.
    What when you were at school? History lessons were quite honest, we were sympathetic to Americans fight, if I remember rightly. It was all quite factual --- later, I suppose at your time, we were all down on the Empire, still are, even in text books. It isn't very healthy now, I feel, it, guilt, discolours our view of things. I mean when guilt makes 'decisions' rather than what is the best plan.

    I have some old text books upstairs, dunno if History is among them.

    In King Georges day? mmmmm where there even text books?

  7. #47
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by allegoricalfact View Post
    What when you were at school? History lessons were quite honest, we were sympathetic to Americans fight, if I remember rightly. It was all quite factual --- later, I suppose at your time, we were all down on the Empire, still are, even in text books. It isn't very healthy now, I feel, it, guilt, discolours our view of things. I mean when guilt makes 'decisions' rather than what is the best plan.

    I have some old text books upstairs, dunno if History is among them.

    In King Georges day? mmmmm where there even text books?

    Yes, I meant when I was in school. I remember while studying American History in high school, I once asked the teacher if she had seen how a British textbook covered the AR. She seemed surprised that I'd ask such a question and admitted that she had no idea.

  8. #48
    New Member Detective Mike Logan's Avatar
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    so all in all I think my research conclude that prior to 1800-ish there was no official national identity of "American". it must have emerged over time. possibly the 2nd war with Britain may have accelerated it. any reference to this term prior to this point would probably have meant a continental sense.

    don't worry NS. i'm sure when the romans were over here (or even later) there was no nationality known as English. we were probably just a ramshackle of village communities and feudal tribes where the average person probably had little idea they lived on an island. i'd take a guess it was probably only a millennia ago that the idea of a nation/nationality emerged here.

  9. #49
    Veteran Member TNVolunteer73's Avatar
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    British Subjects, and after the revolution started Yanks.


    In fact the person that Finished the Ride (since Paul Revere was captured and led the British Troops to the Minutemen's rally point).

    Did not say "The British are coming" but instead "The Regulars Are coming."
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  10. #50
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Detective Mike Logan View Post
    so all in all I think my research conclude that prior to 1800-ish there was no official national identity of "American". it must have emerged over time. possibly the 2nd war with Britain may have accelerated it. any reference to this term prior to this point would probably have meant a continental sense.

    don't worry NS. i'm sure when the romans were over here (or even later) there was no nationality known as English. we were probably just a ramshackle of village communities and feudal tribes where the average person probably had little idea they lived on an island. i'd take a guess it was probably only a millennia ago that the idea of a nation/nationality emerged here.

    Well, we humans tend to develop very simplified myths to represent our past, as a substitute for the complexity that actually was our past. I don't really see how simultaneously holding a sense of belonging to a region, a state, a village and a family was any different for the settlers of America than it was for the settlers of Europe or Asia. I'd guess that the early inhabitants of what is now the United States considered themselves to be both Americans and citizens of whichever state they happened to occupy prior to the confederation of the various states into the nation that we now are. Even that confederation is more a story of evolution than revolution, as we've transitioned slowly from a loose alliance of nation-states into a federal republic.

    Your question concerned what "The British" called the citizens of what is now the US during colonial times. I'd guess that different Brits used different monikers depending upon the context of the conversation, but "America" was firmly established as the name of the continent in those times, and I would therefore assume that referring to colonists as "Americans" was not uncommon.

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