Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 77
Thanks Tree43Thanks

Thread: What did the British refer to "americans" as prior to 1776????

  1. #51
    Established Member NeoVsMatrix's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    5,492
    Thanks
    4591

    From
    NY
    Quote Originally Posted by NightSwimmer View Post
    Britain isn't a superpower and Americans don't really care how the Brits refer to people of other nationalities. Americans had to win their independence from every European nation that attempted to take control of the American territories in addition to engaging in numerous territorial wars with the indigenous people who were here prior to the arrival of the Europeans. It certainly wasn't as simple as merely fighting the British.

    The lands of the Western Hemisphere had been known as "America" since 1507, when German cartographer Martin Waldseemuller produced a world map naming the lands after Amerigo Vespucci. The country name "United States of America" dates back to January of 1776. Prior to that, King George most likely referred to Americans as a Pain in His Royal Ass.
    Let's please agree that those "Americans" that "had to win their independence from every European nation attempting to take control of the American territories"...

    were nothing else but Europeans, attempting to take control of Native-American territory. They fought the folks that brought them there, in order to kill the folks that have been there before them. There's nothing honorable about it, like "defending" something.
    Thanks from jacobfitcher and Leo2

  2. #52
    Established Member BitterPill's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    4,434
    Thanks
    3062

    From
    SoCal
    Quote Originally Posted by Detective Mike Logan View Post
    I'm interested as to when referring to the nationality of an American: what year did this come into practice?? what did the British rulers refer to 'colonials' as during the pre-1776 period.

    I mean surely the title "United States of America" only came about after you won independence from the SUPERPOWER that is Britain. so in my mind the terms "Americans" of phrase like "He's American" or "Hes Canadian" could only have come about after the revolution. was it 1776 when the yanks won independence and christened their nation "the united states of America"? OR AM I MISSING SOMETHING ?

    was the term "American" established already in earlier colonial days. did the British rulers already refer to the colonials as 'Americans'? was it already a general name to describe people of that nationality long before 1776?

    FYI: to avoid confusion. I mean SPECIFICALLY in reference to the nationality (I.e. the USA). Not the AMERICAS as a whole.
    discus.....
    I know that Jonathan Swift appealed to the authority of an American in A Modest Proposal:

    I have been assured by a very knowing American of my acquaintance in London, that a young healthy child well nursed is at a year old a most delicious, nourishing, and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked, or boiled; and I make no doubt that it will equally serve in a fricassee or a ragout.

    which was first published in 1729.

    A Modest Proposal by Jonathan Swift
    Thanks from Friday13

  3. #53
    Established Member BitterPill's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    4,434
    Thanks
    3062

    From
    SoCal
    Quote Originally Posted by Detective Mike Logan View Post
    YOU WOULD SAY I'M ENGLISH. quite simply because that has been the commonly used nationality reference for people from England for hundreds and hundreds of years. or by extension British because i'm from Britain. not rocket science.

    but you didn't have a NATION until 1776.
    I got a similar argument from some knucklehead over Canada. He said Canada didn't exist until 1876, so I produced an order from Washington to invade Canada during our revolutionary war, and I never got a response.

  4. #54
    Moderator jacobfitcher's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    5,420
    Thanks
    4870

    From
    Canada
    Quote Originally Posted by BitterPill View Post
    I got a similar argument from some knucklehead over Canada. He said Canada didn't exist until 1876, so I produced an order from Washington to invade Canada during our revolutionary war, and I never got a response.
    For the record, Canada officially became Canada on July 1, 1867.
    Thanks from BitterPill

  5. #55
    Established Member BitterPill's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    4,434
    Thanks
    3062

    From
    SoCal
    Quote Originally Posted by jacobfitcher View Post
    For the record, Canada officially became Canada on July 1, 1867.
    Of course. My apologies.
    Thanks from jacobfitcher

  6. #56
    Established Member BitterPill's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    4,434
    Thanks
    3062

    From
    SoCal
    The Mexicans are currently struggling with what to call us Americans. For some reason, they don't want to call us Americans even though we are the United States of America, and when I went to school in Mexico, we were called norteamericanos, i.e. North Americans.

    Now the Mexicans have started referring to us as estadoudinenses, United Staters, because our name is the United States of America, and they don't want to call us Americans, but that's not working either. You see, Mexico's official name is Estados Unidos Mexicanos, United States of Mexico, so they are also estodoudinenses.

    In fact, there has been talk in Mexico of ditching the estados unidos part of their name, fearing I suppose that it is too close to their hated neighbors to the north.
    Thanks from Friday13

  7. #57
    Established Member BitterPill's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    4,434
    Thanks
    3062

    From
    SoCal
    Quote Originally Posted by Detective Mike Logan View Post
    so all in all I think my research conclude that prior to 1800-ish there was no official national identity of "American".
    You obviously still have some research to conduct.

    Good luck!

  8. #58
    Established Member BitterPill's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    4,434
    Thanks
    3062

    From
    SoCal
    Since we are speaking of Americans, when I was in grade school, I was maybe six or seven, we were studying that part of our history, the Revolution, and we sang Yankee Doodle Dandy, so I asked the teacher, "why does the American put a feather in his cap and call it macaroni?"

    "It's just a song, Poindexter, just a song," was her reply.

    So about 40 years later I learned that is not the case. Can anyone tell me why a feather in the cap would lead to macaroni?

  9. #59
    He JUST FUCKED up AGAIN! BAZINGA DrumpF's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    7,462
    Thanks
    2761

    From
    Slumming Around In orange baby NEW America!
    Quote Originally Posted by Detective Mike Logan View Post
    I'm interested as to when referring to the nationality of an American: what year did this come into practice?? what did the British rulers refer to 'colonials' as during the pre-1776 period.

    I mean surely the title "United States of America" only came about after you won independence from the SUPERPOWER that is Britain. so in my mind the terms "Americans" of phrase like "He's American" or "Hes Canadian" could only have come about after the revolution. was it 1776 when the yanks won independence and christened their nation "the united states of America"? OR AM I MISSING SOMETHING ?

    was the term "American" established already in earlier colonial days. did the British rulers already refer to the colonials as 'Americans'? was it already a general name to describe people of that nationality long before 1776?

    FYI: to avoid confusion. I mean SPECIFICALLY in reference to the nationality (I.e. the USA). Not the AMERICAS as a whole.
    discus.....
    Subjects?

  10. #60
    Veteran Member Dr.Knuckles's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    96,486
    Thanks
    2663

    From
    Vancouver
    "The Americas" or "America" was used to describe all of North and South America. Someone going to, moving to, living in or born in Brazil or Bermuda or Jamaican or Boston would be called their nationality. Spanish, or British, or Portuguese.

    Britain called their land "The colonies" or "British America". France called there's "New France."

    Folks like Washington or Jefferson would have been called either "British" or one of "English, Scottish or Welsh" prior to the 1776 Revolution.

    When Washington fought in the Indian Wars you'll note everything he and any other colonial resident did was "The British".

    "British North America" was the official name of the post-Revolution mainland colonies. The ones that did not revolt. Even then, American was used to mean the whole shebang.

    We did it with the USSR too.

    Most news reports of Chernobyl referred to "The Russians"

    Not caring that it was in the Ukraine.
    Last edited by Dr.Knuckles; 26th March 2016 at 09:48 PM.

Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 104
    Last Post: 4th August 2014, 01:32 PM
  2. Replies: 136
    Last Post: 19th July 2010, 09:59 PM
  3. FOX News: Americans marry "ethnics" and "other species"
    By Davocrat in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 11th July 2009, 06:28 AM
  4. British Sailors "Pardoned"
    By Migi e! in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 4th April 2007, 09:50 AM
  5. "9/11 Truther" Next British Prime Minister?
    By operator kos in forum World Politics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22nd December 2006, 02:38 PM

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed