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Thread: What did the British refer to "americans" as prior to 1776????

  1. #61
    Veteran Member Dr.Knuckles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BAZINGA DrumpF View Post
    Subjects?
    That's rewriting history.

    British people born in colonies were British. No different than anyone in London proper.

    Washington wore a red coat and pledged loyalty to the King. As a British citizen. Until he changed his mind.
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    Established Member BitterPill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Gently View Post
    That's rewriting history.

    British people born in colonies were British. No different than anyone in London proper.
    Not sure about that. An American had no voice in Parliament, and that was an issue.

  3. #63
    Established Member BitterPill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Gently View Post
    Folks like Washington or Jefferson would have been called either "British" or one of "English, Scottish or Welsh" prior to the 1776 Revolution.
    As I mentioned before, Jonathan Swift called us Americans back in 1726, and that brings up an interesting side discussion. I know Mr. Swift, born in Dublin, would have accepted being called a British Subject whereas someone born in Dublin today would reject that notion vehemently.

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    Wrinkly Member Dangermouse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BitterPill View Post
    Not sure about that. An American had no voice in Parliament, and that was an issue.
    None of the seats of which Parliament was comprised were located in the colonies. Many British people in Britain had no vote either. Nonetheless they were British colonies, and those born there were British.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Detective Mike Logan View Post
    I'm interested as to when referring to the nationality of an American: what year did this come into practice?? what did the British rulers refer to 'colonials' as during the pre-1776 period.

    I mean surely the title "United States of America" only came about after you won independence from the SUPERPOWER that is Britain. so in my mind the terms "Americans" of phrase like "He's American" or "Hes Canadian" could only have come about after the revolution. was it 1776 when the yanks won independence and christened their nation "the united states of America"? OR AM I MISSING SOMETHING ?

    was the term "American" established already in earlier colonial days. did the British rulers already refer to the colonials as 'Americans'? was it already a general name to describe people of that nationality long before 1776?

    FYI: to avoid confusion. I mean SPECIFICALLY in reference to the nationality (I.e. the USA). Not the AMERICAS as a whole.
    discus.....
    The term exists of course to refer to the whole of the Americas prior to 1776. Prior to 1776 the British would use the term American to refer to the native people's generally. They could also refer to colonists or say, Virginian, specifically and occasionally the term could be used to refer to the colonies collectively, which, at times, could even include Canada and places like Bermuda depending on the speakers context, for instance Thomas Paine writes Common Sense addressing it to the "Inhabitants of America"
    Last edited by publius3; 27th March 2016 at 10:55 AM.
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    Established Member BitterPill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dangermouse View Post
    None of the seats of which Parliament was comprised were located in the colonies. Many British people in Britain had no vote either. Nonetheless they were British colonies, and those born there were British.
    There seem to be a lot of Brits on this forum.

    I like it.

  7. #67
    Veteran Member Dr.Knuckles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BitterPill View Post
    Not sure about that. An American had no voice in Parliament, and that was an issue.
    If that exact same person relocated to Southampton they'd be represented in Parliament. If a person in Southampton packed up and moved to Boston, they'd lose theirs.

    They're both British.

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    Veteran Member Dr.Knuckles's Avatar
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    From
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    George Washingtons wiki

    "8] In his youth he became a senior British officer in the colonial militia during the first stages of the French and Indian War."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dangermouse View Post
    None of the seats of which Parliament was comprised were located in the colonies. Many British people in Britain had no vote either. Nonetheless they were British colonies, and those born there were British.
    Alot of French, Dutch and German too and, say, in Maryland, Catholics. So yeah, there were many English colonists who thought of themselves as fighting for the rights of Englishmen, but there were many who were merely subjects of the British crown.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Gently View Post
    That's rewriting history.

    British people born in colonies were British. No different than anyone in London proper.

    Washington wore a red coat and pledged loyalty to the King. As a British citizen. Until he changed his mind.
    Would the French speaking residents of Quebec have thought of themselves as 'British' -- Washington, Jefferson, etc clearly thought of themselves as you sugge st but let's not forget that German had a genuine shot at being a co-official language of the new country, ie it was proposed that laws also be published in German.
    Last edited by publius3; 27th March 2016 at 04:42 PM.
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