Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 678
Results 71 to 77 of 77
Thanks Tree43Thanks

Thread: What did the British refer to "americans" as prior to 1776????

  1. #71
    Veteran Member Dr.Knuckles's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    96,226
    Thanks
    2336

    From
    Vancouver
    Quote Originally Posted by publius3 View Post
    Would the French speaking residents of Quebec have thought of themselves as 'British' -- Washington, Jefferson, etc clearly thought of themselves as you sugge st but let's not forget that German had a genuine shot at being a co-official language of the new country, ie it was proposed that laws also be published in German.

    Yes. I'm just using British as an example. I think I said this back in my first post.

    France's colonies were called "New France". And I'm sure Spanish, Dutch, Portuguese, Russian holdings in the Americas had their own names. And the people there were just normal citizens (subjects).

    Bottom line there was absolutely no difference between the colonies that revolted and those that didn't... until they did.

    Revolutionaries could easily have known, grown up with, been family and blood relations to the red coats they were fighting.
    Last edited by Dr.Knuckles; 28th March 2016 at 09:20 AM.

  2. #72
    Member BitterPill's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    3,946
    Thanks
    2756

    From
    SoCal
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Gently View Post
    If that exact same person relocated to Southampton they'd be represented in Parliament. If a person in Southampton packed up and moved to Boston, they'd lose theirs.

    They're both British.
    You are saying a British Subject in the Americas was not represented in Parliament which is what I have been claiming.

    In fact, that was a large part of why the American colonies revolted. For example, Parliament arbitrarily vacated the Massachusetts charter without consulting Massachusetts:

    https://books.google.com/books?id=zq...harter&f=false

  3. #73
    Moderate Extremist Blues63's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    2,291
    Thanks
    1528

    From
    Planet Stupidô
    Quote Originally Posted by Detective Mike Logan View Post
    I'm interested as to when referring to the nationality of an American: what year did this come into practice?? what did the British rulers refer to 'colonials' as during the pre-1776 period.

    I mean surely the title "United States of America" only came about after you won independence from the SUPERPOWER that is Britain. so in my mind the terms "Americans" of phrase like "He's American" or "Hes Canadian" could only have come about after the revolution. was it 1776 when the yanks won independence and christened their nation "the united states of America"? OR AM I MISSING SOMETHING ?

    was the term "American" established already in earlier colonial days. did the British rulers already refer to the colonials as 'Americans'? was it already a general name to describe people of that nationality long before 1776?

    FYI: to avoid confusion. I mean SPECIFICALLY in reference to the nationality (I.e. the USA). Not the AMERICAS as a whole.
    discus.....
    Was it devised to deliberately to create an independent identity separate from Britain? After all, many colonials were British (cf. Georgia, The Carolinas, Virginia etc.) despite the Spanish and French occupations to the south.

  4. #74
    One
    One is offline
    10 Year Survivor One's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    8,559
    Thanks
    6047

    From
    ----> X <----
    Quote Originally Posted by NeoVsMatrix View Post
    Let's please agree that those "Americans" that "had to win their independence from every European nation attempting to take control of the American territories"...

    were nothing else but Europeans, attempting to take control of Native-American territory. They fought the folks that brought them there, in order to kill the folks that have been there before them. There's nothing honorable about it, like "defending" something.
    Yes, but it's nothing new in history. Bloodshed is the story of humanity.

  5. #75
    Veteran Member TNVolunteer73's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    25,538
    Thanks
    6759

    From
    TN
    Quote Originally Posted by BitterPill View Post
    Since we are speaking of Americans, when I was in grade school, I was maybe six or seven, we were studying that part of our history, the Revolution, and we sang Yankee Doodle Dandy, so I asked the teacher, "why does the American put a feather in his cap and call it macaroni?"

    "It's just a song, Poindexter, just a song," was her reply.

    So about 40 years later I learned that is not the case. Can anyone tell me why a feather in the cap would lead to macaroni?
    Yankee Doodle (fool) put a feather in his cap (Means he pretends to dress up) and look important pretending to be upper crust, and (macroni) is speaking of fancy foods.. (we ate mostly wild game)

    the song was intended as an insult. after we won the war it became a source of pride be cause the Yankee fools that thought too much of themselves defeated the British Empire.
    Thanks from BitterPill

  6. #76
    Member Iolo's Avatar
    Joined
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    3,136
    Thanks
    1338

    From
    Rhondda, Cymru
    I think that, as always with the colonies, no-one here was at all interested, except those who were making money out of these distant places. I thought 'Yankee Doodle' came later, when they were getting above themselves.

  7. #77
    Member BitterPill's Avatar
    Joined
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    3,946
    Thanks
    2756

    From
    SoCal
    Quote Originally Posted by TNVolunteer73 View Post
    Yankee Doodle (fool) put a feather in his cap (Means he pretends to dress up) and look important pretending to be upper crust, and (macroni) is speaking of fancy foods.. (we ate mostly wild game)

    the song was intended as an insult. after we won the war it became a source of pride be cause the Yankee fools that thought too much of themselves defeated the British Empire.
    That's pretty good. The term Macaroni was also associated with British subjects, typically upper class, who had made the Grand Tour.

Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 678

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 104
    Last Post: 4th August 2014, 01:32 PM
  2. Replies: 136
    Last Post: 19th July 2010, 09:59 PM
  3. FOX News: Americans marry "ethnics" and "other species"
    By Davocrat in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 11th July 2009, 06:28 AM
  4. British Sailors "Pardoned"
    By Migi e! in forum Political Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 4th April 2007, 09:50 AM
  5. "9/11 Truther" Next British Prime Minister?
    By operator kos in forum World Politics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22nd December 2006, 02:38 PM

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed