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Thread: Asian vs African nations

  1. #11
    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kallie Knoetze View Post
    Mr. Djinn,

    Verse Asia consiting of former European colonies that were abandoned wheh their respective empires collapsed?
    I'm sorry; I do not understand your question.
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    I'm sorry; I do not understand your question.
    Mr. Djinn,

    You said the colonial nations abandoned their African colonies, thus that is why Africa has not prospered. I pointed out that the colonial powers also abandoned their Asian colonies, yet they perservered nonetheless.

  3. #13
    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kallie Knoetze View Post
    ... You said the colonial nations abandoned their African colonies, thus that is why Africa has not prospered. I pointed out that the colonial powers also abandoned their Asian colonies, yet they perservered nonetheless.
    India was a British colony - but when Britain relinquished political control, they continued to bolster the Indian economy. Not so much in the African colonies.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meursault View Post
    My question is pretty simple. I have my answer or theory which I'll post later but I want to know what people think.

    Why do you think so many Asian nations were/are able to develop to the extent we see while most African nations are left in poverty and disarray?
    Mr. Meursault,

    I recently viewed a PBS documentary which synopsised the book "Guns, Germs, and Steel" by Jared Diamond. On of the points of the show was that Europe was so successful because their societies were situated along the same east-west latitudes. As such, peoples at similar latitudes could grow the same crops and raise the same animals without too much difficulty. The same is true of Asia, so agritechnologies were easily transferable. In Africa, the trade routes were more North-South. Ergo, crops that prospered in the north or south, could not be readily transplanted depending on the direction of trade. As such, depending on the direction of travel, differing crops and differing farming techniques had to used as a society moved farther north or south.

    The second is that in Europe, and in Asia, agriculture developed early, and tribes gathered together in close knit communities, close to livestock and each other. Thus, European and Asian peoples had greater immunities to deseases due to this close contact. Further, with the wide trade routes, they further built up their immunities with contact with other peoples. Africa, there was not so wide spread trade, and the societies came to raising livestock rather late in the game, making the people less immune to desease outbreaks.

    The other aspect is Europe and Asia had horses, which made it easier for trade, and wide spread migration. Southern Africa has few beast of burden.
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Djinn View Post
    India was a British colony - but when Britain relinquished political control, they continued to bolster the Indian economy. Not so much in the African colonies.
    Mr. Dijinn,

    You mean like South Africa, Rhodesia, Kenya, Algeria, Ivory Coast, etc, etc,

  6. #16
    Veteran Member Micro Machines Champion, Race Against Time Champion Tedminator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kallie Knoetze View Post
    Mr. Meursault,

    I recently viewed a PBS documentary which synopsised the book "Guns, Germs, and Steel" by Jared Diamond. On of the points of the show was that Europe was so successful because their societies were situated along the same east-west latitudes. As such, peoples at similar latitudes could grow the same crops and raise the same animals without too much difficulty. The same is true of Asia, so agritechnologies were easily transferable. In Africa, the trade routes were more North-South. Ergo, crops that prospered in the north or south, could not be readily transplanted depending on the direction of trade. As such, depending on the direction of travel, differing crops and differing farming techniques had to used as a society moved farther north or south.

    The second is that in Europe, and in Asia, agriculture developed early, and tribes gathered together in close knit communities, close to livestock and each other. Thus, European and Asian peoples had greater immunities to deseases due to this close contact. Further, with the wide trade routes, they further built up their immunities with contact with other peoples. Africa, there was not so wide spread trade, and the societies came to raising livestock rather late in the game, making the people less immune to desease outbreaks.

    The other aspect is Europe and Asia had horses, which made it easier for trade, and wide spread migration. Southern Africa has few beast of burden.

    yup. that. location location location.

    Jared Diamond's "Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies" offers a good theory which answers the OP question. anyone interested should read the book or watch the series based on it.





    Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies is a 1997 transdisciplinary nonfiction book by Jared Diamond, professor of geography and physiology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). In 1998, it won the Pulitzer Prize for general non-fiction and the Aventis Prize for Best Science Book. A documentary based on the book, and produced by the National Geographic Society, was broadcast on PBS in July 2005.
    Guns, Germs, and Steel - Wiki
    Last edited by Tedminator; 13th November 2015 at 05:06 PM.
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  7. #17
    Senior Member Loki's Avatar
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    I'm not guessing but thinking about books I've read. African nations do not have all domestic animals simply because terrain not habitual for them. This puts less land for growing crops.
    Crops that grow are not the same in Africa's because of the north south grid that Africa has.

    Asia on the other hand has an east west grid that allows all the same crops and domesticated animals that Europe has.

    Edit- sorry for not reading till end of thread before reply.
    The book is guns germs and steel as poster above named, thank you.
    Last edited by Loki; 13th November 2015 at 05:17 PM.
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  8. #18
    Veteran Member Moorhuhn Wanted Champion Hollywood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meursault View Post
    China, Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong ("special administrative region"), Singapore, Vietnam (developing now).

    Thanks.
    Post #7 covers it pretty well.

  9. #19
    Veteran Member Moorhuhn Wanted Champion Hollywood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tedminator View Post
    yup. that. location location location.

    Jared Diamond's "Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies" offers a good theory which answers the OP question. anyone interested should read the book or watch the series based on it.





    Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies is a 1997 transdisciplinary nonfiction book by Jared Diamond, professor of geography and physiology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). In 1998, it won the Pulitzer Prize for general non-fiction and the Aventis Prize for Best Science Book. A documentary based on the book, and produced by the National Geographic Society, was broadcast on PBS in July 2005.
    Guns, Germs, and Steel - Wiki
    Read that some years ago, excellent work.
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  10. #20
    Council Member Djinn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kallie Knoetze View Post
    Mr. Dijinn,

    You mean like South Africa, Rhodesia, Kenya, Algeria, Ivory Coast, etc, etc,
    Again - there are always exceptions. I'm speaking in general terms.

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