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Thread: What Historical Eras or Events Are You Drawn To?

  1. #61
    Radical Centrist BigLeRoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heirtothewind View Post
    ''The Pearl''' is a good collection of Victorian porn. Lots of spanking.
    Well, those loose Victorian women probably DESERVED to be spanked, showing off their ankles like that!

  2. #62
    Moderate Extremist Blues63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigLeRoy View Post
    Not too many Americans study the history of the Byzantine Empire. We should. The Byzantine Empire was one of the world's major powers, from its beginning right up to the cataclysmic Battle of Manzikert, in the year 1071 AD, when they lost control of nearly all of Anatolia to the Turks.
    I think a lot of western universities ignore the Byzantines. They thought of themselves as Romans, and they preserved much of the extent classical literature. The Roman East never really embraced the Latin language, and Greek remained the demotic language throughout Roman history. By the time of Heraklios (610), Latin had disappeared as the language of commerce, government and justice in the east.

    Many lay people don't realise that the Roman Empire continued on long after the fall of Italy and the west. The popular view of the Roman Empire 'falling' owing to decadence couldn't be further from the truth. It merely evolved and waned over an incredibly long period of time, until it was no larger than a city state.
    Last edited by Blues63; 26th July 2016 at 01:25 AM.
    Thanks from BigLeRoy and heirtothewind

  3. #63
    Moderate Extremist Blues63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heirtothewind View Post
    I wrote several articles on ancient Roman numismatics. Sold my collection.
    Wow. I once had a small mail order business specialising in Roman numismatics (pre internet). I had an extensive personal collection of high grade Republican and Imperatorial silver which I sold a few years ago. I once was asked to value a University collection that was the best I've ever seen. Such high grade early Greek silver is so rare.

    In high school, I thought I might become a professor of Latin and classical archaeology.
    Do you keep up with your Latin? As I get older it slips away....
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  4. #64
    New Member heirtothewind's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blues63 View Post
    Wow. I once had a small mail order business specialising in Roman numismatics (pre internet). I had an extensive personal collection of high grade Republican and Imperatorial silver which I sold a few years ago. I once was asked to value a University collection that was the best I've ever seen. Such high grade early Greek silver is so rare.



    Do you keep up with your Latin? As I get older it slips away....
    Yes - there are many old Latin readers on archive.org. I can also PM you several good numismatic sites.

  5. #65
    Radical Centrist BigLeRoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blues63 View Post
    I think a lot of western universities ignore the Byzantines. They thought of themselves as Romans, and they preserved much of the extent classical literature. The Roman East never really embraced the Latin language, and Greek remained the demotic language throughout Roman history. By the time of Heraklios (610), Latin had disappeared as the language of commerce, government and justice in the east.

    Many lay people don't realise that the Roman Empire continued on long after the fall of Italy and the west. The popular view of the Roman Empire 'falling' owing to decadence couldn't be further from the truth. It merely evolved and waned over an incredibly long period of time, until it was no larger than a city state.
    Heraklios is one of history's most tragic characters, in my mind. Under his leadership, the Byzantines finally inflicted crushing defeats on their major rival, the Sasanid Empire of Persia.....only to be immediately faced with the irruption of the Arabs and their new religion of Islam.
    Thanks from heirtothewind and Blues63

  6. #66
    New Member heirtothewind's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blues63 View Post
    I think a lot of western universities ignore the Byzantines. They thought of themselves as Romans, and they preserved much of the extent classical literature. The Roman East never really embraced the Latin language, and Greek remained the demotic language throughout Roman history. By the time of Heraklios (610), Latin had disappeared as the language of commerce, government and justice in the east.

    Many lay people don't realise that the Roman Empire continued on long after the fall of Italy and the west. The popular view of the Roman Empire 'falling' owing to decadence couldn't be further from the truth. It merely evolved and waned over an incredibly long period of time, until it was no larger than a city state.
    An essay I wrote-


    FALL OF ROME vs TRANSFORMATION OF ROME


    The traditional date for the ‘’fall’’ of the Roman Empire, as given by Edward Gibbon, is 476 CE when Odoacer deposed Romulus Augustulus, an insignificant event that marks the beginning of the Middle Ages. Historians can argue, however, that the Middle Ages began when Constantine converted to Christianity in 313 CE and that the ‘’crisis of the third century’’ set the stage for early feudal society. There was no dramatic ‘’fall’’ of Rome but rather a transformation of the classical Roman society and culture to an essentially Germanic medieval society and culture created through the following factors-

    The constant internecine wars which determined who would be the next barracks- emperor supplanted the orderly imperial succession after the death of Marcus Aurelius, as well as the efficiency of public administration with trained civil servants that Trajan had established with his pedagogium. Together with Germanic peoples allowed to settle within the empire, this chaos facilitated the later military invasions of Rome by the Visigoths, Vandals, and Ostrogoths. The fragmentation of Europe, ruled by military feudal lords, was characteristic of the Middle Ages.

    Inflation and the dwindling of a money economy created serfdom. The double denarius [‘’antoninianus’’] introduced in 214 CE was only 60-percent silver and had become a bronze coin by 275 CE. The coinage reform of Diocletian [10 silver argenti = 1 gold solidus] was short-lived and insufficient, as most coins of the fourth century are unidentifiable bronze coins, even though the silver siliqua [a thin silver coin resembling the medieval English penny] and gold solidus [equal to 24 siliquae] were minted. Unable to pay taxes with the debased and dwindling supply of coins, small farmers turned their land over to larger land owners, who had pre-paid the taxes [hence known as ‘’tax farmers’’], and became serfs tied to the land. Serfdom, of course, was another characteristic of the Middle Ages.

    Christianity, which dominated the Middle Ages, gained a firm grip with Constantine’s conversion, and the authority of church leaders gradually eroded the power and prestige of the emperor and secular authorities. The Council of Nicea [325 CE] and the Council of Constantinople [381 CE] laid the foundations of a unified Christian doctrine and temporal powers of bishops. By threats of excommunication and withholding sacraments, for example, Bishop Ambrose of Milan influenced or intimidated Theodosius into allowing Christians to burn synagogues with impunity and persecuting pagans. Civic duty, the cornerstone of classical Rome, and Christian dogma became inextricably enmeshed in the society of late antiquity.

    Thus, by the fourth century, emerged the three orders of medieval society- [1] those who fought, the knights; [2] those who labored, the peasants; and [3] those who prayed, the clergy. The non-secular literature and highly stylized art, which I have not addressed, were cultural changes more identified with the Middle Ages than with classical antiquity.
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  7. #67
    Radical Centrist BigLeRoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heirtothewind View Post
    An essay I wrote-


    FALL OF ROME vs TRANSFORMATION OF ROME


    The traditional date for the ‘’fall’’ of the Roman Empire, as given by Edward Gibbon, is 476 CE when Odoacer deposed Romulus Augustulus, an insignificant event that marks the beginning of the Middle Ages. Historians can argue, however, that the Middle Ages began when Constantine converted to Christianity in 313 CE and that the ‘’crisis of the third century’’ set the stage for early feudal society.
    And there are other historians, such as Henri Pirenne, who argued that the Middle Ages did not really begin until the rise of Islam. Like you, Pirenne argued that the 'fall' of the Western Empire was really not a very significant event, but for a very different reason: the Germanic kingdoms which replaced Roman rule in the West were still maintaining all the FORMS of Roman society. Pirenne argued that it was only the rise of Islam that marked a major rupture in history.

    Very interesting post!
    Thanks from heirtothewind

  8. #68
    Southern Strategy Liberal OldGaffer's Avatar
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    Anyone ever read L Sprague deCamps novel, Lest Darkness Fall?

    Lest Darkness Fall is similar to Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. American archaeologist Martin Padway is visiting the Pantheon in Rome in 1938. A thunderstorm arrives, lightning cracks, and he finds himself transported to Rome in the year 535 AD.

    When Padway arrives, Italy is ruled by the Ostrogoths, a Germanic tribe which has recently overthrown the Western Roman Empire. The novel depicts their rule as a benevolent despotism, allowing freedom of religion and maintaining the urban Roman society they had conquered.

    In the real timeline the Byzantine or Eastern Roman Empire temporarily expanded westwards, embarking on what came to be known as the Gothic War (535–554). They overthrew the Ostrogoths and the Vandals in north Africa, but this war devastated the Italian urbanized society that was supported by a settled hinterland, and by the end of the conflict Italy was considerably depopulated: its population is estimated to have decreased from 7 million to 2.5 million people. The great cities of Rome were abandoned, the Byzantines never fully consolidated their rule over Italy, which faced further invasions by the Lombards, and Italy fell into a long period of decline. Some historians consider this the true beginning of the Dark Ages, at least in regards to Italy.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lest_Darkness_Fall

    Read this back in the 1950's and it fired a life long interest in history.
    Thanks from BigLeRoy

  9. #69
    Senior Member Sparta's Avatar
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    Ive been drawn to different historical events at different times in my life.

    Right now I can't get enough Mayflower, King Phillip's War & anything plains tribal history, if it concerns the Apache I'm all in.

  10. #70
    Veteran Member Dr Sampson Simpson's Avatar
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    Wwii

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