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Thread: She was gonna blow up Hitler

  1. #1
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    She was gonna blow up Hitler

    Moscow by December of 1941, was a grim place.

    The Germans were advancing day by day. People on the outskirts of the city had Red Army artillery positions dug in right next to them


    You could see sandbagged defense points along many big streets


    There were anti-aircraft crews positioned atop many tallest buildings, firing on German planes coming to bomb the city


    The underground Metro was a shelter for many terrified women and children

    while hundreds of thousands of civilians were joining armed militias to help the military defend the capital

    They came from all walks of life, from factory workers to theater actors; plenty were young teen boys, from high schools. All were desperate, but determined. As one 1941 Militia veteran put it in an interview I read, they figured the Germans would take the city, but were not gonna give it to them cheap: "We were to fight them for every street; every building; every floor and every room of that building; to the last drop of our blood." People were badass, back then...

    The government also prepared. I wrote before about the bunker built for Stalin and other elites, in the city of Samara (then called Kuibyshev, I believe) where they were to move if Moscow fell. I also knew, and wrote here, that they planted bombs in many important buildings.

    I did not, however, know many details.

    Just now, on a Russian history channel I watch on satellite, there was a show, which talked about the underground resistance network Soviet intelligence prepared in Moscow, in case the city fell to the Germans.

    In charge of this thing, was the famous general Pavel Sudoplatov

    The man who organized the assassination of Trotsky in Mexico.

    These people, men and women, were carefully handpicked; they were trained for months in a secret "academy" set up for this, taught expert knowledge of weapons, hand to hand combat, explosives, intelligence gathering, and propaganda. They were given new identities and whole new lives, with new jobs and, for some, even new spouses and family all arranged by the NKVD. These people were to be the nucleus of the resistance in Moscow under German occupation, and recruit others around them. They too came from all walks of life; from a former Tsarist army officer (picked for his biography and emigre connections in Germany through his sister and other post-Civil War emigrants he knew; it was believed he'd be able to work himself into a trusted position with the occupation authorities), to a leader of a criminal gang (who escaped a GULag sentence in turn for participating in this! All in all, there were about 1,300 of these operatives trained and ready. Secret caches of weapons were prepared for them all around the city. They were also issued easily hidden portable radio stations. These, they were to use both to report valuable intel to command; and also to broadcast messages on public waves about any mistreatment of local civilians, and anything awful the Germans did, to inspire and maintain a hatred for the occupants among the local people.

    The most important job, however, fell to then just 23 year old Anna Kamaeva-Filonenko


    Soviet intelligence apparently learned, from intercepted German messages, that, after Moscow fell, Hitler would personally visit the city; he allegedly wanted to hold a parade on Red Square; erect some kind of monument to his great victory there; and then go see a performance at Bolshoi Theater.

    It would then fall for young Anna (who was arranged a job at the Theater just for this purpose) to wait until Hitler and a bunch of other German bigwigs were at the Bolshoi; she would then trigger a huge explosive device actually built in right under the bloody stage! All the German leadership would be buried and killed. As would Anna. But, like all those elite operatives, she was ready to give her life for her Motherland...

    Fortunately, this proved unnecessary. The defense of the city held. The Siberian Divisions rolled in to the rescue. The enemy was pushed back. And back. And back. All the way to Berlin.

    And Anna Filonenko would yet distinguish herself as one of the best and most famous female intel officers in WWII, parachuting behind enemy lines to help organize and lead partizan resistance squads; and later, during the Cold War, into the early 60s, she and her husband, also a spy, did lots of undercover work all over the world, Asia, South America, and, yes, the US.

    She retired as a colonel of KGB, as far as I know the only female colonel of KGB

    November 28th was her birthday. She died in June, 1998.

    She was well known. Even I heard of her (when lived in communal apartment; a guy in room next to me was a huge KGB/NKVD history buff, had lots of books by Sudoplatov and other famous spies, I read many of them, because had nothing else to read then lol) Filonenko was mentioned in plenty of them. There was also a book by her too, about her work in South America.

    This episode of her bio however was never widely discussed. I never knew it, I doubt many over there did. The woman who would have blown up Hitler... Wow...
    Thanks from Friday13, Hollywood and Blues63

  2. #2
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    You know, this all makes me contemplate...

    What if things did work out this way? What if the Germans did prevail back then, and actually take Moscow? And the Hitler did come, and Anna did assassinate him at the Bolshoi, along with many top generals and such, back in late '41 or early '42?

    How would the war go after that?

    I see two ways.

    A. The loss of their supreme leader shocks and stuns the Germans; there would be chaos on the ground, disarray, at least initially. The Red Army may use it to regain the initiative on the Eastern Front. Maybe even to retake Moscow and push them back from there exactly as they did in reality, only without originally losing the city in first place. And the Western Allies could probably also take advantage. Maybe the Invasion of Normandy would have happened much earlier too.

    Or,

    B. Maybe, the Nazis would become enraged by the killing of the Fuhrer. Certainly, one of the factors in the defeat of the Germans by the Red Army, was their deteriorating morale, their troops' disillusionment and demoralization, due to the high casualties and awful conditions, including weather, etc. Maybe, this would have, in fact, inspired them to fight harder, to avenge Hitler. And, also, another big factor in their defeat, were plenty of bad mistakes made by Hitler. Could a better tactician succeed him as Fuhrer?

    However... Without Hitler, would the whole Nazi system even have survived? Would the Holocaust still have happened? It often seems to me as though that whole party and their government system, all hung on that one man. If he were to die like this, early on in the war... maybe it would have all disintegrated, the way the Soviet Communist Party eventually did?

    All interesting questions to consider... This is why I love history lol
    Thanks from Hollywood

  3. #3
    Above the FRAY Friday13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    ...
    This episode of her bio however was never widely discussed. I never knew it, I doubt many over there did. The woman who would have blown up Hitler... Wow...
    Obviously Hitler didn't learn from Bonaparte's mistakes...

    Historians draw several comparisons and similarities between the two invasions. Both campaigns began in June, when the weather was favorable, but the attacking armies were later caught within Russia's borders after the winter set in. Hitler and Napoleon both underestimated the strength, resilience and fighting spirit of the Russian defenders. Joseph Stalin's scorched earth policy weakened the German army by depriving them of acquiring any supplies or food from the territory they entered. Front line troops were forced into a "hand-to-mouth" existence, desperately short of vital supplies and succumbing to sub-zero winter temperatures. The enactment of both campaigns proved to be a fatal mistake, turned the tide of war and led to ultimate defeat.

    How did Hitler's invasion of Russia compare with Napoleon's
    Thanks from The Man

  4. #4
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Friday13 View Post
    Obviously Hitler didn't learn from Bonaparte's mistakes...
    Indeed. BTW, I also recently learned that, when the Russians were storming Paris at the end of that war; Napoleon actually wanted to burn much of it also, same as Kutuzov burned Moscow. But, the French general in charge there refused to do anything, unless an order came in writing. Thus, the beautiful historic buildings of the French capital were spared
    Thanks from Friday13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Friday13 View Post
    Obviously Hitler didn't learn from Bonaparte's mistakes...
    Napoleon Bonaparte lost the war in Russia. He left his army and had left it back without leadership. Afterwards they were destroyed from a broken ordnance and the Russian winter. Perhaps we can say Napoleon Bonaparte was the greatest high traitor of France, who ever had lived. In case of Hitler I don't think Hitler liked to win any war - he liked to do war. Perhaps he never came back from World War 1 and was lucky to find the US-American ally - the extreme psychopath Stalin - in his personal war tyrant against tyrant, better to say in his personal war tyrant together with tyrant.

    Last edited by zaangalewa; 6th February 2018 at 01:59 AM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    Indeed. BTW, I also recently learned that, when the Russians were storming Paris at the end of that war; Napoleon actually wanted to burn much of it also, same as Kutuzov burned Moscow. But, the French general in charge there refused to do anything, unless an order came in writing. Thus, the beautiful historic buildings of the French capital were spared
    It's said when Hitler had conquered Paris he liked to destroy it completely. On an unknown reason he changed his mind when he took a look over Paris from a hill in the evening. If he had done so, then I'm sure we would know nothing about the current history of Europe after world war 2.

    Last edited by zaangalewa; 6th February 2018 at 02:17 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    ... Or, Certainly, one of the factors in the defeat of the Germans by the Red Army, was their deteriorating morale ...
    One of the most funny sentences I ever read in my life.


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