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Thread: On This Day in History

  1. #11
    Cat-tastic Babba's Avatar
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    In 1783, the American Revolutionary War ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris by the United States and the Kingdom of Great Britain.

    Although Cornwallis' surrender at Yorktown in the Fall of 1781 marked the end of the Revolutionary War, minor battles between the British and the colonists continued for another two years.

    Finally, in February of 1783 George III issued his Proclamation of Cessation of Hostilities, culminating in the Peace Treaty of 1783. Signed in Paris on September 3, 1783, the agreement — also known as the Paris Peace Treaty — formally ended the United States War for Independence.
    I will be visiting Yorktown in a couple of weeks. I've been to Williamsburg and Jamestown a couple of times. But never to Yorktown.

  2. #12
    Unbound Helena's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babba View Post
    I will be visiting Yorktown in a couple of weeks. I've been to Williamsburg and Jamestown a couple of times. But never to Yorktown.
    Seems to be a fun place to visit. Lots of things to see for a town that according to Wikipedia only has a population of around 220.





    Why, they even have a nice phallic structure there!





    September 4:

    In 1774, during the second voyage of Captain James Cook, New Caledonia was first sighted by Europeans.

    In 1781, 44 Spanish settlers founded El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora La Reina de los Ángeles de Porciúncula (The Village of Our Lady, the Queen of the Angels of Porziuncola), nowadays known as the place where dreams turn into nightmares (David Lynch) (well, I think he was referring to Hollywood, but you catch my drift).

    In 1797, three members of the French Directory, supported by the military, staged the Coup of 18 Fructidor. The French Revolutionary Calendar is the best. the calendar of the French Revolution | France

    In 1870, Emperor Napoleon III of France was deposed and the Third Republic was declared.

    In 1886, after almost thirty years of fighting, Apache leader Geronimo and his remaining warrriors surrendered to General Nelson Miles in Arizona.

    In 1888, George Eastman registered the Kodak trademark and received a patent for his camera that used roll film.

    In 1944, the British army liberated the Belgian city of Antwerp.

    In 1949, the Peekskill Riots erupted after a Paul Robeson concert in Peekskill, New York.

    In 1951, the first live transcontinental television broadcast took place in San Francisco, from the Japanese Peace Treaty Conference.

    In 1972, Mark Spitz became the first athlete to win seven medals at a single Olympic Games.

    In 1998, Google was founded by Larry Page and Sergey Brin.

    In 2010, a 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck the South Island of New Zealand, causing widespread damage and several power outages.

    Some notable people born on September 4: Francois-René de Chateaubriand (1768), Antonin Artaud (1896), Ivan Illich (1926), and Igor Cavalera, the drummer from Sepultura (1970).

    Some notable people who died on September 4: Edvard Grieg (1907), Albert Schweitzer (1965), and Georges Simenon (1989).

  3. #13
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    Born on September 4th:

    1968 - John William Dimaggio. You might not have heard of him, but I'm sure you'd recognise his voice:


  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helena View Post
    Seems to be a fun place to visit. Lots of things to see for a town that according to Wikipedia only has a population of around 220.





    Why, they even have a nice phallic structure there!





    September 4:

    In 1774, during the second voyage of Captain James Cook, New Caledonia was first sighted by Europeans.

    In 1781, 44 Spanish settlers founded El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora La Reina de los Ángeles de Porciúncula (The Village of Our Lady, the Queen of the Angels of Porziuncola), nowadays known as the place where dreams turn into nightmares (David Lynch) (well, I think he was referring to Hollywood, but you catch my drift).

    In 1797, three members of the French Directory, supported by the military, staged the Coup of 18 Fructidor. The French Revolutionary Calendar is the best. the calendar of the French Revolution | France

    In 1870, Emperor Napoleon III of France was deposed and the Third Republic was declared.

    In 1886, after almost thirty years of fighting, Apache leader Geronimo and his remaining warrriors surrendered to General Nelson Miles in Arizona.

    In 1888, George Eastman registered the Kodak trademark and received a patent for his camera that used roll film.

    In 1944, the British army liberated the Belgian city of Antwerp.

    In 1949, the Peekskill Riots erupted after a Paul Robeson concert in Peekskill, New York.

    In 1951, the first live transcontinental television broadcast took place in San Francisco, from the Japanese Peace Treaty Conference.

    In 1972, Mark Spitz became the first athlete to win seven medals at a single Olympic Games.

    In 1998, Google was founded by Larry Page and Sergey Brin.

    In 2010, a 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck the South Island of New Zealand, causing widespread damage and several power outages.

    Some notable people born on September 4: Francois-René de Chateaubriand (1768), Antonin Artaud (1896), Ivan Illich (1926), and Igor Cavalera, the drummer from Sepultura (1970).

    Some notable people who died on September 4: Edvard Grieg (1907), Albert Schweitzer (1965), and Georges Simenon (1989).
    I didn't know about the phallic structure. It's certainly a plus.

  5. #15
    Unbound Helena's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babba View Post
    I didn't know about the phallic structure. It's certainly a plus.


    September 5:

    In 1666, the Great Fire of London ends. Apparently it only killed six people, which is remarkable considering it destroyed around 10,000 buildings.

    In 1698, Tsar Peter I of Russia, in an effort to "westernise" his upper classes, imposed a tax on beards for all men except the clergy and peasantry. This might very well be the coolest historical event remembered in this thread so far.

    In 1725, Louis XV of France married Maria Leszczyńska.

    In 1774, the first American Continental Congress assembled in Philadelphia.

    In 1836, Sam Houston was elected the first president of the Republic of Texas.

    In 1839, the United Kingdom declared the First Opium War on the Qing Dynasty of China.

    In 1862, James Glaisher and Henry Tracey Coxwell broke the world record for altitude whilst collecting meteorologist data in their balloon. They attained the height or approximately 11,887 m (39,000 ft). According to Wiki, Glaisher "became insensible," and Coxwell, "unable to use his frostbitten hands, opened the gas-valve with his teeth, and made an extremely rapid but safe descent."

    In 1877, Sioux chief Crazy Horse was bayoneted by a US soldier after resisting confinement in a guardhouse at Fort Robinson, Nebraska.

    In 1882, the first United States Labor Day parade was held in New York City.

    In 1905, the Treaty of Portsmouth ended the war between Russia and Japan.

    In 1941, the entire territory of Estonia was occupied by Nazi Germany.

    In 1944, Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg formed the Benelux.

    In 1960, Muhammad Ali (then Cassius Clay) was awarded the gold medal for his first place in the light heavyweight boxing competition at the Olympic Games in Rome.

    In 1969, US Army Lt. William Calley was charged with six specifications of premeditated murder for the death of 109 Vietnamese civilians in My Lai.

    In 1972, a Palestinian terrorist group called "Black September" attacked and took hostage 11 Israel athletes at the Olympic Games in Munich. 2 died in the attack and 9 died the following day.

    In 1975, Lynette Fromme attempts to assassinate US President Gerald Ford in Sacramento.

    In 1977, Hanns Martin Schleyer, former Nazi officer, then President of both Confederation of German Employers' Associations (BDA) and Federation of German Industries (BDI), was kidnapped in Cologne, West Germany, by the Red Army Faction and later murdered. Wow, it seems that the 1970s were a decade full of terror, doesn't it?

    In 1977, Voyager 1 was launched after a brief delay.

    In 1980, the St. Gotthard Tunnel opened in Switzerland as the world's longest highway tunnel at 16.224 km (10.14 miles).

    In 2011, Jacques Chirac stood trial in Paris for embezzlement charges.

    Some of the notable people born on September 5: Louis XIV of France (1638), Giacomo Meyerbeer (1791), Jack Daniel, founder of Jack Daniel's (1846), Jesse James (1849), Arthur Koestler (1905), John Cage (1912), George Lazenby (1939), Raquel Welch (1940), Werner Herzog (1942), Freddie Mercury (1946), and Liam Lynch (1970; happy birthday to the President of the United States of Whatever!).

    Some of the notable people who died on September 5: Catherine Parr, sixth and last wife of Henry VIII of England (1548), Crazy Horse (1877, we've covered that), Charles Péguy (1914), Mother Theresa (1997).

  6. #16
    Cat-tastic Babba's Avatar
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    In 1862, James Glaisher and Henry Tracey Coxwell broke the world record for altitude whilst collecting meteorologist data in their balloon. They attained the height or approximately 11,887 m (39,000 ft). According to Wiki, Glaisher "became insensible," and Coxwell, "unable to use his frostbitten hands, opened the gas-valve with his teeth, and made an extremely rapid but safe descent."
    I'll bet he did become insensible! It's a wonder they survived!

  7. #17
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    Baloons were also used for observation during the Civil War

    Here's a, very old, pic: Professor Lowe's military balloon near Gaines Mill, Virginia

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babba View Post
    I'll bet he did become insensible! It's a wonder they survived!
    Seriously.

    Publius, that is a fabulous picture. Reminds me of the Golden Age of Ballooning:



    September 12:

    Sept 12, 490 BC is the "conventionally accepted" (Wikipedia) date for the Battle of Marathon. The Athenians and their Plataean allies defeated the first Persian invasion force of Greece. The legend of the Greek messenger Pheidippides running to Athens with news of the victory became the inspiration for this athletic event that was (re-)introduced at the 1896 Athens Olympics and originally run between Marathon and Athens.

    In 1683, the combined armies of the Holy Roman Empire and the Kingdom of Poland defeated the Ottoman Empire in the Battle of Vienna. Prior to that, the city had been besieged by the Turkish army for two months. Rumor has it that thanks to the siege, we in Central Europe (insignificant part of Eastern Europe for Americans) nowadays bake rohlíks, the iconic pastry the shape of which is supposed to have been inspired by the crescent on Turkish flags.



    Most rohlíks are more or less straight these days, though. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

    In 1848, Switzerland became a federation.

    In 1919, Adolf Hitler joined the German Workers Party.

    In 1933, Leo Szilárd, allegedly waiting for a red light on Southampton Row in Bloomsbury, London, conceived the idea of a nuclear chain reaction. In the words of Richard Rhodes, author of "The Making of the Atomic Bomb":

    "In London, where Southampton Row passes Russell Square, across from the British Museum in Bloomsbury, Leo Szilárd waited irritably one gray Depression morning for the stoplight to change. A trace of rain had fallen during the night; Tuesday, September 12, 1933, dawned cool, humid and dull. Drizzling rain would begin again in early afternoon. When Szilárd told the story later he never mentioned his destination that morning. He may have had none; he often walked to think. In any case another destination intervened. The stoplight changed to green. Szilárd stepped off the curb. As he crossed the street time cracked open before him and he saw a way to the future, death into the world and all our woes, the shape of things to come."

    Leó Szilárd - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    In 1940, cave paintings in Lascaux were discovered by four teenage boys and their dog named Robot. Those paintings, mostly images of large animals, are estimated to be 17,300 years old.

    In 1953, US Representative John Fitzgerald Kennedy marries Jacqueline Lee Bouvier in Newport.

    In 1958, Jack Kilby demonstrated the first integrated electronic circuit, now known as microchip.

    In 1959, the USSR launched Lunik or Luna 2, the first spacecraft to reach the surface of the Moon. (This happened on the next day, September 13.)

    In 1974, Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia, 'Messiah' of the Rastafari movement, was deposed following a military coup by the Derg that ended his reign of 58 years.

    In 1979, Indonesia was hit with an earthquake measuring 8.1 on the Richter scale.

    In 1980, the third of the four post-war military coups occurred in Turkey.

    In 1988, Hurricane Gilbert devastated Jamaica.

    In 1992, NASA launched Space Shuttle Endeavour, marking the 50th shuttle mission. On board were Mae Carol Jemison, the first African-American woman in space, Mamoru Mohri, the first Japanese citizen to fly in a US spaceship, and Mark Lee and Jan Davis, the first married couple in space.

    In 1994, Abimael Guzmán, leader of the Shining Path, was captured by Peruvian special forces. The rest of Shining Path's leadership fell shortly thereafter.

    In 2003, the UN lifted sanctions against Libya after that country agreed to accept responsibility and recompense the families of victims in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103.

    In 2007, Joseph Estrada, former president of the Philippines, was convicted of the crime of plunder. He thus became the first Philippine president who was impeached (in 2000) and then convicted. He was sentenced to "reclusión perpetua" but pardoned and released on October 26, 2007. He'd spent seven years in detention in total. In May 2012, Estrada announced his intention to run for Mayor of Manila in the 2013 elections.

    Some of the interesting people born on September 12: Ferdinand Brokoff (1688), the guy who made (for example) many of the statues on the Charles Bridge ( Charles Bridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ), H. L. Mencken (1880), Maurice Chevalier (1888), Irene Joliot-Curie (1897), Juscelino Kubitschek de Oliveira (1902), the Brazilian president who "built" the city of Brasília and who is often considered "the father of modern Brazil," Jesse Owens (1913), Stanisław Lem (1921), and a Swedish singer NAMED September (1984; September (singer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ).

    Some of the interesting people who died on September 12: Jean-Philippe Rameau (1764), Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher (1819), Steve Biko, South African anti-apartheid activist who was killed in police custody (1977), Anthony "Norman Bates" Perkins (1922), Russian astronaut Boris Yegorov (1994), Johnny Cash (2003), David Foster Wallace (2008), and Claude Chabrol (2010).

  9. #19
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    September 13:

    In 335, Emperor Constantine the Great consecrated the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem.

    In 1501, Michelangelo begun work on the statue of David.

    In 1541, after three years of exile, John Calvin returned to Geneva where he later reformed the church under a body of doctrine known as Calvinism.

    In 1584, the Escorial Palace, the residence of kings of Spain, was finished.
    El Escorial - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    In 1609, Henry Hudson reached the river that would later be named after him, the Hudson River.

    In 1788, New York City became the temporary capital of the United States. On the same day, the Philadelphia Convention sets the date for the first presidential election in the US (my guy won!).

    In 1791, King Louis XVI of France accepted the new constitution.

    In 1898, Hannibal Goodwin patented celluloid photographic film.

    In 1922, the temperature at 'Aziziya, Libya reached a world record, 57.8 C (136 F).

    In 1923, following a military coup, Miguel Primo de Rivera took over and set up a dictatorship in Spain.

    In 1953, Nikita Khrushchev was appointed Secretary General of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

    In 1956, IBM introduced the RAMAC 305, the first computer disk storage unit.

    In 1968, Albania left the Warsaw Pact.

    In 1971, Chairman Mao's second in command and successor Marshal Lin Biao fled the country via plane after the failure of alleged coup against Mao. The plane crashed in Mongolia, killing all aboard.

    In 1989, Desmond Tutu led the largest anti-apartheid march in South Africa.

    In 1993, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin shook hands with PLO chairman Yasser Arafat at the White House after signing the Oslo Accords that granted limited autonomy to Palestine.

    Some notable people born on September 13: Cesare Borgia (1475), Jan Brueghel the Younger (1601), Clara Schumann (1819), Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach (1830), General John J. Pershing (1860), J. B. Priestley (1894), Roald Dahl (1916), Stella McCartney (1971).

    Some notable people who died on September 13: Roman Emperor Titus (81), Michel de Montaigne (1592), Italo Svevo (1928), Lin Biao (1971, obviously, see above), Tupac Shakur (1996).
    Last edited by Helena; 13th September 2012 at 02:50 PM. Reason: OMG I killed Tupac a year earlier..

  10. #20
    Cat-tastic Babba's Avatar
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    In 335, Emperor Constantine the Great consecrated the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem.
    That's a reminder of how long all this stuff has been going on. Sigh.

    In 1922, the temperature at 'Aziziya, Libya reached a world record, 57.8 C (136 F).
    See! It got really hot back then! Global warming is a hoax!

    In 1956, IBM introduced the RAMAC 305, the first computer disk storage unit.
    Kewl.

    In 1989, Desmond Tutu led the largest anti-apartheid march in South Africa.
    Very, very cool.

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