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Thread: On This Day in History

  1. #41
    Nuisance Factor Yeti 8 Jungle Swing Champion, YetiSports 4 - Albatross Overload Champion, YetiSports7 - Snowboard FreeRide Champion, Alu`s Revenge Champion boontito's Avatar
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    This Day In History:

    2011: "What? The turkey is all gone?" -Boontito

    2008: "Seriously? There's no more turkey?" -Boontito

    2006: "C'mon, who ate all the turkey?!?!?" -Boontito

    2003: "This is ridiculous! The turkey's all gone already!" -Boontito

    1998: "There's still duck left? That's okay. I already made myself a peanut butter sandwich." -Boontito

  2. #42
    Unbound Helena's Avatar
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    December 17:

    In 1538, Pope Paul III excommunicated Henry VIII of England.

    In 1718, Britain declared war on Spain.

    In 1777, France formally recognized the United States of America.

    In 1819, Simon Bolívar declared the independence of the Republic of Gran Colombia.

    In 1862, General Ulysses S. Grant issued General Order No. 11, expelling Jews from Tennessee, Mississippi, and Kentucky.

    In 1903, the Wright Brothers made their first powered and heavier-than-air flight in North Carolina.

    In 1938, Otto Hahn discovered the nuclear fission of the heavy element uranium, the basis of nuclear energy, and the Atomic Age begun.

    In 1989, the first full-length episode of the Simpsons, "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire," was aired in the USA.

    Some of the notable birthdays: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770; this is actually his baptism date, apparently his birthday is unknown), Émile Roux, the physician and scientist who discovered the anti-diptheria serum (1853), Ford Madow Ford (1873), Erskine Caldwell (1903), Nobel laureate (radiocarbonate dating) Willard Libby (1908), John Kennedy Toole, author of The Confederacy of Dunces (1937), and Josef Lada (1887), the Czech answer to Norman Rockwell before Rockwell:





    Some notable deaths: Simon Bolívar (1830), Kaspar Hauser (1833), Désirée Clary (1860), Leopold II of Belgium (1909); all these people had simply amazing life stories, the kind that would look "too much" in movies. Also, Dorothy L. Sayers (1957), Marguerite Yourcenar (1987), Captain Beefheart (2010), and Kim Jong-il (2011).

  3. #43
    Cat-tastic Babba's Avatar
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    This morning my husband mentioned that about Grant kicking all of the Jews out of Tennessee, Mississippi, and Kentucky. I'd never heard that before.

    I'd also never heard of your Czech Norman Rockwell. His work is very folksy.

  4. #44
    Unbound Helena's Avatar
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    Until yesterday, I never heard about the "No Jews in Kentucky" etc. order, either.

    Josef Lada may very well be the most widely popular Czech artist. He also helped immortalize the Good Soldier Schweik, as @res knows.

    As one art critic once said, the paintings of Josef Lada accompany Czechs from cradle to grave. He is as well known for his illustrations of fairy tales and children’s readers as he is for his landscapes, which each Christmas are printed thousands of times over on the front of the nation’s Christmas cards. Lada was also the artist who gave the grinning, rotund Good Soldier Švejk his form.
    Radio Prague - Josef Lada ? landscape painter and ?vejk illustrator

    Today it's been a year since Václav Havel died.

  5. #45
    Cat-tastic Babba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helena View Post
    Until yesterday, I never heard about the "No Jews in Kentucky" etc. order, either.

    Josef Lada may very well be the most widely popular Czech artist. He also helped immortalize the Good Soldier Schweik, as @res knows.



    Radio Prague - Josef Lada ? landscape painter and ?vejk illustrator

    Today it's been a year since Václav Havel died.
    Thanks for the link to Lada's life and art. I really like his stuff. It's another window into Czech culture.

    Havel seems to be a big part of Czech culture, also. I think I remember that you actually say you saw him, in person, just before he died.

  6. #46
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    It was excessive in scope of course, not artfully drafred at all. It was aimed at black market cotton traders who Grant perceived to be Jewish, of course the verbatim order would've ethnically cleansed his military department, but in a certain sense was directed at traders coming south (the first carpet baggers)

  7. #47
    Unbound Helena's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babba View Post
    Thanks for the link to Lada's life and art. I really like his stuff. It's another window into Czech culture.

    Havel seems to be a big part of Czech culture, also. I think I remember that you actually say you saw him, in person, just before he died.
    Thank you, that's very sweet of you to remember that. Yes, I did see him from up close (the closeness was sort of unexpected, he passed me in a narrow hallway) at a conference two months before his death, and I was shocked by how horribly ill he looked. He was never a big guy, but he turned impossibly fragile during those last months, and his face was SO haggard it was scary. He seemed to be in a great mood, though. And based on what I've heard and read, his death was actually a very peaceful one, and mentally he remained in top form till the very last moments.

    There were numerous gatherings, conferences and other events to commemorate the anniversary of his death, not just here but also in Poland, Italy, Brussels and possibly elsewhere. This however was probably the most unique initiative:

    Admirers Press 'Short Trousers' To Honor Vaclav Havel

    But just so I don't turn this into a Czech nationalist thread, today is also the day when Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" went on sale (1843) and the day the last Rolls Royce Silver Ghost was sold in London (1927).

  8. #48
    Cat-tastic Babba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helena View Post
    Thank you, that's very sweet of you to remember that. Yes, I did see him from up close (the closeness was sort of unexpected, he passed me in a narrow hallway) at a conference two months before his death, and I was shocked by how horribly ill he looked. He was never a big guy, but he turned impossibly fragile during those last months, and his face was SO haggard it was scary. He seemed to be in a great mood, though. And based on what I've heard and read, his death was actually a very peaceful one, and mentally he remained in top form till the very last moments.

    There were numerous gatherings, conferences and other events to commemorate the anniversary of his death, not just here but also in Poland, Italy, Brussels and possibly elsewhere. This however was probably the most unique initiative:

    Admirers Press 'Short Trousers' To Honor Vaclav Havel

    But just so I don't turn this into a Czech nationalist thread, today is also the day when Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" went on sale (1843) and the day the last Rolls Royce Silver Ghost was sold in London (1927).
    Lol. That's a cute story about his pants. Not the part about his being in prison, of course.

  9. #49
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    The guy who coined the word "robot" would celebrate his 123rd birthday today.

    Karel ?apek - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Karel Čapek introduced and made popular the frequently used international word robot, which first appeared in his play R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots) in 1920. While it is frequently thought that he was the originator of the word, he wrote a short letter in reference to an article in the Oxford English Dictionary etymology in which he named his brother, painter and writer Josef Čapek, as its actual inventor.[7] In an article in the Czech journal Lidové noviny in 1933, he also explained that he had originally wanted to call the creatures laboři (from Latin labor, work). However, he did not like the word, seeing it as too artificial, and sought advice from his brother Josef, who suggested "roboti" (robots in English).

    The word robot comes from the word robota, meaning literally serf labor, and, figuratively, "drudgery" or "hard work" in modern Czech (in Slovak, Russian, Polish, archaic Czech and other Slavic languages a similar word means simply "work").
    That's far from his only or biggest contribution, though. He's one of the very few Czech writers I love, and I highly recommend "War With The Newts" at least.

    War with the Newts (Válka s mloky in the original Czech), also translated as War with the Salamanders, is a 1936 satirical science fiction novel by Czech author Karel Čapek. It concerns the discovery in the Pacific of a sea-dwelling race, an intelligent breed of newts, who are initially enslaved and exploited. They acquire human knowledge and rebel, leading to a global war for supremacy.
    War with the Newts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I love almost everything he wrote, though.
    Thanks from Decarow

  10. #50
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    It's been a year since the Costa Concordia disaster.

    Costa Concordia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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