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Thread: On This Day in History

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    Unbound Helena's Avatar
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    On This Day in History

    I figure it might be "neat" to have a thread dedicated to the historical events that happened on the day our calendars show as we slowly progress to meet our Maker. Please feel free to add anniversaries of events that you know of or find out and that you think are worth a mention or, even better, a conversation.

    August 28 gives me these:

    In 1609, Henry Hudson discovered what later became known as Delaware Bay.

    In 1809, the French army accepted the British Navy's surrender in the Battle of Grand Port.

    In 1833, the Slavery Abolition Act received the Royal Assent and effectively abolished slavery in most (emphasis on most) of the British Empire.

    In 1845, the first issue of Scientific American was published.

    In 1859, a geomagnetic storm occured that caused aurora borealis to shine so brightly that it was visible over parts of Europe, America and Japan.

    In 1898, Caleb Bradham invented the soft carbonated drink that later became known as Pepsi Cola.

    In 1917, ten suffragettes were arrested for picketing the White House.

    In 1937, Toyota Motors became an independent company.

    In 1953, Japan's first TV show was broadcasted.

    In 1957, American senator Strom Thurmond began a filibuster to prevent the Senate from voting on Civil Rights Act. This turned out to be the longest filibuster ever conducted by a single senator, seeing as he spoke for 24 hours and 18 minutes. Wow, is that even humanly possible? There must have been breaks (I assume??), but still.

    In 1963, Martin Luther King gave his "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

    In 1979, an IRA bomb exploded at the Grand Place in Brussels, a terrorist act carried out possibly in cooperation with the Palestinian Liberation Organization. Thankfully it seems that no one was killed, but 16 people were injured, 4 of those being members of a British military band. Somewhat related, and interesting article:
    How terrorists acquire technology and training: lessons from the IRA

    In 1990, Iraq declared Kuwait its province.

    In 1991, Mikhail Gorbachev resigned as Secretary General of the Soviet Communist Party. Related: Ukraine declares independence from the USSR.

    In 1996, Charles and Diana divorce. OK, I know this isn't REAL history, but it's one of the few events I remember.

    At least three important writers were born on August 28: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749), Leo Tolstoy (1828), and Sheridan Le Fanu (1814), the guy who helped vampires invade literature before Bram Stoker came along.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helena View Post
    In 1953, Japan's first TV show was broadcasted.
    Well, I had to follow this one up and find out whether the first ever show involved tentacle porn or people having to shove their heads into tanks full of scorpions. Apparently neither, but your timetable's not quite accurate. The first show which wasn't just a test of equipment seems to have been sent out in 1940. You might not count it as a proper TV show, seeing as nobody had a TV yet, but it was watchable at a couple of broadcasting studios. The programme, apparently, was "a domestic drama depicting the ordinary life of a family of three: a young unmarried woman, her older brother, and their mother." Sounds thrilling.

    Things got stopped for the war, but then regular TV broadcasting began in 1953, but in February, not August. NHK (the Japan Broadcasting Corporation) began regular broadcasts on February 1st. On August 28th broadcasts began by Japan's first commercial Tv studio, NTV.

    I still can't find the first programmes from the fifties, and thus am opting for tentacle porn.

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    Unbound Helena's Avatar
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    You're right, I should have said "Japan's first commercial broadcast." This is underscored by the fact that the programme also included the first TV ad:

    Commercial television in Japan dates from August 28, 1953 when Nihon TV first broadcast. That day also marks the advent of the first Japanese CM. It was a "Noon Time Announcement" for the present-day Seiko company. It was aired, film backwards, no sound, for a mere three seconds before it was pulled off.
    ("CM" meaning "commercial message")

    KJ #46 - Media in Asia - Sei Keiko on Japanese CMs

    I can't find what the show was about either, only that they aired a baseball game live on the next day. So tentacle porn is probably a pretty good guess for the day before.

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    August 29:

    I know no one cares about this, but it's an important date in Czech history: in 1526, the Ottoman Turks led by Suleiman the Magnificent (now that's what I call a name) defeated and killed Louis II, the last Jagellonian king of Bohemia and Hungary, in the Battle of Mohács.

    In 1756, Frederick the Great invaded Saxony and the Seven Years' War begun.

    In 1758, the first American Indian Reservation was established, at Indian Mills, New Jersey.

    In 1825, Portugal recognized the independence of Brazil.

    In 1831, Michael Faraday discovered electromagnetic induction.

    In 1842, the Treaty of Nanking was signed and the First Opium War ended.

    In 1885, Gottlieb Daimler patented the world's first internal combustion motorcycle, the Reitwagen.

    In 1898, the Goodyear tire company was founded.

    In 1910, the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910, also known as the Japan–Korea Annexation Treaty, became effective, officially starting the period of Japanese rule in Korea. @Dr.Gently bait.

    In 1911, Ishi, considered the last Native American to make contact with European Americans, emerged from the wilderness of northeastern California. It sounds like a fascinating and very sad story.
    Ishi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    In 1922, the first radio advertisement was broadcast on WEAF-AM in New York City.

    In 1944, Slovak National Uprising took place as 60,000 Slovak troops turned against the Nazis.

    In 1949, the USSR tested their first atomic bomb, known as First Lightning, in Kazakhstan.

    In 1966, the Beatles performed their last concert before paying fans at Candlestick Park in San Francisco.

    In 2003, Ayatollah Sayed Mohammed Baqir al-Hakim, the Shia Muslim leader in Iraq, was assassinated in a terrorist bombing, along with nearly 100 worshippers as they were leaving a mosque in Najaf.

    In 2005, Hurricane Katrina devastated much of the US Gulf Coast from Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle.

    Today is also the birthday of these people: John Locke (1632, @Cicero bait), Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809), Richard Attenborough (1923), Dinah Washington (1924), William Friedkin (1935), John McCain (1936), Bob Beamon (1946), and Michael Jackson (1958).

    These people died on August 29: Louis II, King of Hungary and Bohemia (durrrr, what did I say up there? ....1526), Atahualpa, Inca Emperor (1533), Brigham Young (1877), Manolete, possibly the most famous bullfighter of all time (1947: Manolete - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia), Ulysses S. Grant (1968), and Ingrid Bergman (1982)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Helena View Post
    Atahualpa, Inca Emperor (1533)
    Atahualpa's death deserves to be listed as an event by itself, since he was the last indepedent Incan emperor before the Spanish conquest. He died at the hands of the Spaniards, shortly after being baptised. Supposedly he agreed to the baptism in exchange for not being burnt to death, since in Incan religious belief he wouldn't make it to the afterlife if burnt - so I'm not sure this counts as a sincere conversion. They garotted him instead.

    Also on this day, in 1960, a bomb was set off in the office of Hazza' al-Majali, Jordanian Prime Minister, killing him and several other senior government figures.
    Last edited by caffeine; 29th August 2012 at 03:34 AM.

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    1974, 220 people arrested at a free pop festival at Windsor Great Park, the fans had camped overnight without permission, and some resisted the police's heavy-handed efforts to move them on. That festival died out, but Glastonbury went from strength to strength.
    Last edited by Dangermouse; 29th August 2012 at 04:37 AM.
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    In 1911, Ishi, considered the last Native American to make contact with European Americans, emerged from the wilderness of northeastern California. It sounds like a fascinating and very sad story.
    Ishi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    It is an interesting and sad story. I caught a TV show about this guy last weekend.

    Ishi, Man From the Wild : Video : Travel Channel

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    August 30:

    In 1835, the city of Melbourne was founded.

    Just a year later, the city of Houston was founded.

    In 1909, Charles Doolittle Walcott discovered the Burgess Shale in British Columbia.
    Burgess Shale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    In 1918, Fanny Kaplan shot and seriously injured V. I. Lenin.

    In 1945, British Armed Forces liberated Hong Kong from Japan.

    In 1963, the Hotline connecting the leaders of the USA and the USSR went into operation.

    In 1981, President Mohammad-Ali Rajai and Prime Minister Mohammad-Javad Bahonar of Iran were assassinated in a bombing committed by the People's Mujahedin of Iran.

    Among notable people born on August 30: Jacques-Louis David, the painter of the French Revolution (1748), Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (1797), Ernest Rutherford (1871), Huey Long (1893), Warren Buffet (1930), Robert Crumb (1943; @Davocrat bait), Alexander Lukashenko (1954), Alexander Litvinenko (1962), the KGB officer who died of poisoning (?) six years ago.

    Some notable people who died on August 30: Henri Barbusse (1935), Max Factor (1938), Guy Burgess, one of the Cambridge Five (1963; Cambridge Five - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ) Lindsay Anderson (1994).

    Apparently Cleopatra committed suicide on August 30, BC, but I can't help thinking those dates are sort of doubtful.
    Last edited by Helena; 30th August 2012 at 03:09 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Helena View Post
    Apparently Cleopatra committed suicide on August 30, BC, but I can't help thinking those dates are sort of doubtful.
    Even if we've got perfectly accurate sources for the date of things this old, I'm never quite sure what they mean. What calendar are they working in? Does it mean that someone has counted backwards using the current, Gregorian calendar, and worked out that it would have been August 30th, if people used the Gregorian calendar then? Or do they mean that it was 30th August using the Julian calendar of the time (technically 30th Sextillis, since this was 20 years before the month was renamed August in honour of the Emperor Augustus)? They'd be completely different days.
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    Quote Originally Posted by caffeine View Post
    Even if we've got perfectly accurate sources for the date of things this old, I'm never quite sure what they mean. What calendar are they working in? Does it mean that someone has counted backwards using the current, Gregorian calendar, and worked out that it would have been August 30th, if people used the Gregorian calendar then? Or do they mean that it was 30th August using the Julian calendar of the time (technically 30th Sextillis, since this was 20 years before the month was renamed August in honour of the Emperor Augustus)? They'd be completely different days.
    It is quite maddening when you think of it.

    September 3:

    In 301, Saint Marinus founded San Marino, today the world's oldest republic still in existence and one of the smallest nations in the world. I spent a day there when I was a kid, it's a very cool place.
    http://www.sanmarinosite.com/eng/index.php

    In 1189, Richard I of England, also known as Richard the Lionheart, was crowned at Westminster.

    In 1658, Richard Cromwell became Lord Protector of England.

    In 1666, the Great Fire of London burned down the Royal Exchange building.

    In 1777, during the Battle of Cooch's Bridge (seriously?), the Flag of the United States was flown in battle for the first time.

    In 1783, the American Revolutionary War ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris by the United States and the Kingdom of Great Britain.

    In 1803, John Dalton started using symbols to represent the atoms of different elements.

    In 1838, future abolitionist Frederick Douglass escaped from slavery.

    In 1901, the Australian National Flag was flown for the first time.

    In 1939, France, the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Australia declared war on Germany after the invasion of Poland, forming the Allies. Also, the United Kingdom and France begun a naval blockade of Germany that lasted until the end of the war. This also marks the beginning of the Battle of the Atlantic.

    In 1943, Allied invasion of Italy begun.

    In 1945, three-day celebration was held in China, following the Victory over Japan Day on September 2.

    In 1971, Qatar became an independent state.

    In 1994, Russia and China agreed to de-target their nuclear weapons against each other.

    In 2001, Belfast Protestant loyalists begun a picket of Holy Cross, a Catholic primary school for girls. For the next 11 weeks, riot police escorted the schoolchildren and their parents through hundreds of protesters, some of whom hurled missiles and abuse. Fierce rioting occurred.

    In 2004, the Beslan hostage crisis ended on its third day, with the deaths of at least 385 people, more than half of which were children.

    Some of the notable people born on September 3: Diana de Poitiers, longtime mistress of the King Henry II of France (1499; interesting lady who was 19 years older than the king), Ferdinand Porsche (1875), Alison Lurie (1926).

    Some of the notable people who died on September 3: Oliver Cromwell (sort of explains how his son became Lord Protector on the same day.... 1658), Ivan Turgenev (1883), Edvard Beneš, second President of Czechoslovakia (1948), Frank Capra (1991). On this very day, September 3, 2012, Sun Myung Moon, founder of the Unification Church, died at the age of 92.

    It is the Flag Day in Australia, the Independence Day in Qatar, the Feast of San Marino and the Republic, and the anniversary of the victory over Japan is celebrated in China and Taiwan. It is also the Merchant Navy (Rememberance) Day in Canada and the UK.

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