Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
Thanks Tree7Thanks

Thread: Sanctions-schmanctions

  1. #1
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    33,310
    Thanks
    19023

    From
    Toronto

    Talking Sanctions-schmanctions


    A general view shows a power plant under construction in Sevastopol, Crimea, July 5, 2017. REUTERS/Anton Zverev

    Russia has delivered electricity turbines made by Germany's Siemens to Crimea, a region subject to European Union sanctions barring EU firms from supplying it with energy technology, three sources with knowledge of the delivery told Reuters.

    Reuters was unable to determine if Siemens knew of or condoned the equipment transfer, but the move exposes the German company to potential accusations of indirect sanctions-busting and of not taking sufficient safeguards to ensure its equipment does not end up on territory most countries view as illegally annexed, say legal experts.

    "Siemens has not delivered turbines to Crimea and complies with all export control restrictions," said Wolfram Trost, a spokesman for Siemens in Munich, when asked to confirm the turbine transfer to Crimea.

    Citing client confidentiality, he did not answer written questions asking whether Siemens was aware that the turbines had been shipped to Crimea and whether it would now be activating or servicing them.

    Russia needs the turbines for two Crimean power plants the Kremlin wants to get up and running to fulfill a promise, made by President Vladimir Putin, to ensure a stable power supply for the region's residents after it was annexed by Moscow from Ukraine in 2014.

    Delivery of the turbines, intended for the two new power stations under construction, had been delayed for over a year because the firms involved feared violating EU sanctions, people involved in the project have told Reuters.

    Russia's Energy Ministry, which oversees the Crimea power plants project, declined to comment. It referred questions to Technopromexport, the Russian state-owned firm which is building the plants. Technopromexport declined to comment.

    One source close to the project, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the topic, told Reuters that two of the turbines had been delivered from Russia by sea to Crimea.

    He said they were destined for use in a power plant in the Crimean city of Sevastopol. He said the turbines were unloaded at Sevastopol port, and that preparatory work was underway at the power plant site to install and commission the turbines.

    The turbines were SGT5-2000E gas turbines, he said, a type manufactured only by Siemens and its subsidiaries.

    RUSSIA OR CRIMEA?

    An official in Crimea's energy sector who is familiar with the power plants project, and an employee with a company involved in the project, also said the turbines were Siemens turbines, and that they had been delivered to Crimea.

    EU sanctions bar European individuals and companies from providing energy technology to Crimea or from taking any actions designed to circumvent those rules due to the bloc's view that the peninsula was illegally stolen from Ukraine.

    Legal experts say there are no court precedents to say whether Siemens could be held responsible if a third party brought the turbines to Crimea.

    When asked about the matter, the European Commission has declined to comment on the Siemens case in the past, saying it is up to EU member states to enforce sanctions rules on their companies.

    When asked about the issue on Wednesday, a spokesman for German's Ministry for Economic Affairs said he had no immediate comment.

    The individual close to the project and the official in the Crimea energy sector told Reuters the turbines delivered to the port in Sevastopol had come from Taman, located in southern Russia, some 10 miles (16 km) from Crimea.

    Siemens told reporters in March that a Russian joint venture in which it has a majority stake supplied turbines for use in a power plant that was planned for construction in Taman.

    The joint venture, Gas Turbine Technologies LLC, made the turbines that were sent to Taman at its factory in the Russian city of St Petersburg.

    Siemens has a 65 percent share in the joint venture, and Russian company Power Machines has a 35 percent stake.

    The sanctions barring the supply of energy technology to Crimea do not apply to the Taman project because it is located on internationally recognized Russian territory.

    The turbines for the Taman plant were bought by Technopromexport - the same company building the two Crimea plants - because, it previously said, it would be building the plant in Taman.

    Sources close to the Crimean project have previously told Reuters that one of the options under consideration was to use the Taman turbines in Crimea.

    Asked about that possibility last year, Siemens said it was supplying the turbines only for use in Taman, and not in Crimea.

    It said at the time it had "no reason" to believe the turbines would be diverted to Crimea, and said it respected and would abide by the sanctions regime.

    (Additional reporting by Andrew Osborn in Moscow, by Gernot Heller and Michelle Martin in Berlin and by Alissa de Carbonnel in Brussels; Writing by Christian Lowe; Editing by Mike Collett-White)
    Exclusive: Siemens turbines delivered to Crimea despite sanctions - sources

    haha Exactly as I figured would happen...

    Taman is just across the Krech Straight from Crimea.

    There is also the port city of Novorossiysk, in Southern Russia, also not far from Crimea, and which has reportedly now become a huge hub for bringing all kinds of sanctioned and banned stuff in and out of Crimea: Crimea: Circumventing Trade Sanctions via Novorossiysk | EurasiaNet.org

    The sanctions ain't gonna do shit
    Thanks from Blues63

  2. #2
    Veteran Member
    Joined
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    19,624
    Thanks
    5410

    From
    midwest
    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    Exclusive: Siemens turbines delivered to Crimea despite sanctions - sources

    haha Exactly as I figured would happen...

    Taman is just across the Krech Straight from Crimea.

    There is also the port city of Novorossiysk, in Southern Russia, also not far from Crimea, and which has reportedly now become a huge hub for bringing all kinds of sanctioned and banned stuff in and out of Crimea: Crimea: Circumventing Trade Sanctions via Novorossiysk | EurasiaNet.org

    The sanctions ain't gonna do shit
    They usually don't.

    They hurt the average citizens, but not the gubmints that they are supposed to influence.

    Not their leaders, either.

    Does Putin or Lil Kim look like they have changed anything because of the sanctions?
    Thanks from The Man

  3. #3
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    33,310
    Thanks
    19023

    From
    Toronto
    (Reuters) - Technopromexport, a Russian state-owned firm which is building power plants in Crimea, said on Thursday it had bought four electricity turbines for the project on the secondary market.

    Reuters reported on Wednesday, citing sources, that Russia had delivered turbines made by Germany's Siemens to Crimea, a region subject to European Union sanctions barring EU firms from supplying it with energy technology.

    Technopromexport did not say on Thursday who the turbines it had bought on the secondary market were made by or who it bought them from. It said the turbines had been modernized by specialized Russian factories and engineering companies.

    Technopromexport added it had earlier failed to reach an agreement to buy turbines made by Iranian company MAPNA.

    Building the power plants in Crimea is a prestige project for Russia, since President Vladimir Putin promised to ensure a stable power supply for the region's residents after it was annexed by Moscow from Ukraine in 2014.

    A spokesman for Siemens in Munich earlier told Reuters that Siemens had not delivered turbines to Crimea.

    The spokesman did not answer written questions asking whether Siemens was aware that Siemens turbines had been shipped to Crimea and whether it would now be activating or servicing them.

    (Reporting by Gleb Stolyarov and Anastasia Lyrchikova; Writing by Alexander Winning)
    Russian firm says bought turbines for Crimea on secondary market | Reuters

  4. #4
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    33,310
    Thanks
    19023

    From
    Toronto

    A general view shows a power plant under construction in Sevastopol, Crimea July 4, 2017. REUTERS/Anton Zverev

    By Anton Zverev, Anastasia Lyrchikova and Gleb Stolyarov | MOSCOW

    A firm part-owned by Germany's Siemens has been hired to help install electricity turbines in Crimea, a region subject to European Union sanctions barring EU firms from supplying it with energy technology, three sources close to the project told Reuters.

    Reuters exclusively reported earlier this week, citing sources with knowledge of the delivery, that Russia had delivered Siemens-made turbines to Crimea for use in two power plants under construction there.

    Siemens has denied it supplied any turbines to Crimea. In a statement issued on Friday, it said that if one of its customers had, in violation of the sales contract, re-routed any turbines to Crimea, the company "will not provide any deliveries or services for installation, commissioning support, or warranty."

    However, the three sources said that one of the firms involved in the installation and commissioning of the turbines in Crimea is Russian-registered ZAO Interautomatika. Siemens has a 45.7 percent stake in the firm, according to public records.

    According to its website, the systems that Interautomatika offers to clients "are based on the use of technology that is produced by Siemens, or under license from Siemens."

    On Siemens' Russian language website, Interautomatika is described as a "Solution Partner" to the German firm.

    Asked about the involvement of Interautomatika in the Crimea power plants project, a Siemens spokesman said in a statement provided to Reuters: "Siemens stands by its earlier position that no gas-turbine warranty, installation and commissioning support services will be provided."

    "We are investigating the involvement of Interautomatika in the commissioning of gas turbines and any other services and if proven true, we will take all necessary and available steps to terminate any activities as soon as possible."

    Technopromexport, the Russian state-owned firm which is building the two power plants, declined to answer questions about the issue. Interautomatika did not immediately respond to Reuters questions.

    Reuters has not been able to determine if Siemens knew of or approved of the delivery of the turbines, or the role of Interautomatika in the power plant projects.

    The turbines, and the role of Interautomatika, expose the Germany company to potential accusations of insufficient safeguards to ensure its equipment does not end up on territory most countries view as illegally annexed, some legal experts say.

    In its statement on Friday, Siemens said it had no credible evidence about actual deliveries of its turbines to Crimea but had set up a task force to clarify the facts. It said it had taken all possible legal measures and would take operational steps to prevent the equipment from being used unlawfully.

    PRESTIGE PROJECT

    The Kremlin wants to get the two Crimean power plants up and running to fulfill a promise, made by President Vladimir Putin, to ensure a stable power supply for the region's residents after it was annexed by Moscow from Ukraine in 2014.

    The Siemens-made turbines are a vital component because they are the only ones that fit into the foundations already laid for the power plants, and Russian firms are not able to manufacture comparable equipment on their own.

    Technopromexport, the main contractor on the project, said on Thursday that it bought the turbines on the secondary market. It did not disclose the seller or the manufacturer of the turbines. It said they had been modernized by specialized Russian factories and engineering companies which it did not name.

    Delivering the turbines to the site of the power stations is only the start of a complex process to get them running. They are highly sophisticated pieces of equipment packed with electronics and running off specialist software.

    They therefore require specialist engineers to install and commission them.

    One of the three sources, who all spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue, said a contract had been signed under which Interautomatika, together with other Russian firms, would provide commissioning services for the turbines in Crimea.

    The source did not say when the contract with Interautomatika was signed, or who awarded the contract.

    Reuters was not able to find documents on the award of such a contract.

    EU sanctions bar European individuals and companies from providing energy technology to Crimea or from taking any actions designed to circumvent those rules due to the bloc's view that the peninsula was illegally stolen from Ukraine.

    Legal experts say there are no court precedents to say whether Siemens could be held responsible if a third party supplied the technology to Crimea.

    The European Commission did not respond to a request for comment on the delivery of the turbines. An EU source with knowledge of the issue said the EU has little ability to ensure compliance, leaving much of that to national governments.

    When asked about the delivery of the turbines on Wednesday, a spokesman for German's Ministry for Economic Affairs said he had no immediate comment.

    The other Interautomatika shareholders apart from Siemens are Technopromexport, with 17 percent, and VTI, a Russian power sector research institute, with 37 percent, according to the company's website.

    (Additional reporting by Svetlana Reiter and Andrew Osborn in Moscow and Alissa de Carbonnel in Brussels; Writing by Christian Lowe; Editing by Nick Tattersall)
    Exclusive: Firm part-owned by Siemens hired to help install turbines in Crimea - sources | Reuters

    Meanwhile, also, here is the bridge, also coming up steadily (the highway section was 70% complete, and railway - 30%, just over a month ago)



    Those arches are fucking huge, here with some workers on top, for perspective


    Biggest project in modern Russian history, right there...

  5. #5
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    33,310
    Thanks
    19023

    From
    Toronto
    Germany's Siemens AG says at least two gas turbines delivered to Russia were re-routed to Crimea, in violation both of European sanctions and a contract with the company.

    Siemens told the dpa news agency Monday the Russian customer, who was not identified, had confirmed multiple times in writing that the turbines would not go to Ukraine's Crimean peninsula, which was annexed by Russia in 2014.

    The company says "this action is a clear breach of the delivery contract with Siemens" and that it's setting up a task force to re-examine all of its Russian contracts.

    The European Union allows the export of power generation equipment to Russia, but not to Russian-occupied Crimea.

    Munich prosecutors say they're considering whether to investigate if Siemens violated sanctions regulations with the delivery last summer.
    Germany's Siemens says Russia sent turbines to Crimea - ABC News

    Also: Siemens says at least two turbine sets moved to Crimea | Reuters

    (Reuters) - Germany's Siemens has taken legal action to prevent the installation of its electricity turbines in Crimea, a region subject to EU sanctions for energy technology, a company source with knowledge of the situation told Reuters on Monday.

    President Vladimir Putin promised to establish a stable power supply for Crimea after annexing the region in 2014. The EU imposed the sanctions on Russia because it considered that the peninsula was taken illegally from Ukraine.

    Industrial group Siemens says it built the turbines for a project on Russia's Taman peninsula but Reuters reported last week that Russia had delivered them on to Crimea.

    Siemens says any rerouting of the turbines to Crimea would constitute a breach of contractual agreements, and has put in place a task force to investigate the facts on the ground.

    "All steps have been set in motion to prevent the building, the installation and the operation of the Siemens gas turbines in Crimea," said the source, who did not want to be named because the matter is still under investigation.

    The Kremlin said on Monday the turbines being installed in Crimea were made in Russia from Russian components.

    Siemens says the turbines were made at Siemens Gas Turbine Technologies LLC, which is based in St Petersburg. It is 65 percent owned by Siemens AG and uses Siemens technology.

    The Siemens source said the company had taken steps including legal action to prevent components necessary for the commissioning of the turbines from being delivered to Crimea.

    Three sources close to the matter told Reuters last week that Russia's ZAO Interautomatika had been hired to help install the turbines in Crimea.
    Siemens to press charges after turbines moved from Russia to Crimea | Reuters

    They will do what, exactly? Sue a Russian company no doubt linked to the government, working on a project important to the Kremlin, in a Russian court? lol Good luck with that...

    No doubt they are just making these noises to ptetend they can do something, trying to salvage their reputation in the West lmao Hey, this is what happens when you do business with Russians, they do what they need and want and don't give a shit about your wishes and needs or your laws. That's why normal people simply DON'T do business there hehe

    Meanwhile, first asphalt is being poured on the Kerch Bridge:






    New season for student volunteers has just started there too, new Student Construction Brigades from universities across Russia are arriving, once again, to help build the Bridge


    They perform basic physical labor, under supervision, of course


    The girls, like this young lady from Moscow State University, do mainly office work


    Some really smart ones are even doing some sort of high tech design shit on computers


    And in your spare time, you can hang out on the beach


    Maybe meet a local chick, Crimean girls are smoking hot, God knows


    Heck of a job, if you can get it, all in all, even if unpaid (they get points for experience there, which would help their grades at uni and also in finding actual paid employment in their field later on.
    Thanks from Thx1138

  6. #6
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    33,310
    Thanks
    19023

    From
    Toronto
    FRANKFURT — One of Germany’s biggest companies said Monday that it had become an unwitting pawn in a scheme to evade sanctions against Russia and break a de facto blockade of electricity to the annexed territory Crimea.

    The company, Siemens, a giant engineering and electronics conglomerate based in Munich, said a Russian customer had illegally shipped two power plant turbines to Crimea instead of their intended destination in southern Russia. The diversion of the turbines flouted what Siemens said was an agreement not to violate sanctions imposed by the international community after Russia annexed the territory from Ukraine in 2014.

    The incident threatens to strain relations between the countries, just days after Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany hosted a contentious meeting of world leaders in Hamburg, attended by President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia. The Russian customer, Technopromexport, has close ties to the Kremlin.

    The incident also demonstrates how energy has become a weapon in Russia’s continuing struggle with Ukraine, Crimea’s main source of electricity until the conflict interrupted supplies. Moscow had apparently become so desperate to solve an acute power shortage that it was willing to risk inflaming tensions with Germany.

    “Russia-E.U. relations are already not in a good place, not least because there seems to be no pathway for E.U. sanctions easing at this point,” said Mujtaba Rahman, managing director for Europe at Eurasia Group, a political consultancy. “In this light, this is going to be seen as something of a provocative act by Russia and will further deteriorate relations between Berlin and Moscow.”

    The dispute will also do nothing to encourage foreign investment or repair Russia’s reputation as a place where contracts are often ignored, property is subject to arbitrary seizure and there is little legal recourse.

    Siemens has been one of Russia’s most reliable foreign investors. It has done business in Russia since the rule of the czars and usually avoids saying anything to offend the government.

    But abandoning any pretense of diplomacy, Siemens said it would begin criminal and civil proceedings in Russia against those responsible for what it called the fraudulent export of the turbines. The unusually sharp statement on Monday followed news reports about the violations, from what the company called “reliable sources.”

    Siemens also said it had been lied to by its Russian customer. Technopromexport had repeatedly reassured Siemens that the turbines would not be sent to Crimea, Siemens said.

    The Kremlin’s spokesman, Dmitry S. Peskov, said Monday that the turbines had been made in Russia from Russian parts and were not subject to sanctions restrictions. According to Siemens, the turbines were made in Russia with a Russian partner but by contract subject to the sanctions.

    “This development constitutes a clear breach of Siemens’s delivery contracts, which clearly forbid our customer from making deliveries to Crimea,” Siemens said.

    While hurt by sanctions, Russia has been in a prolonged economic slump mostly because of low oil prices. Crimea is different. The peninsula, isolated and contested, is under a stricter regime, and electricity in particular has been politicized.

    In 2015, Ukrainian nationalists blew up electrical pylons, and rolling blackouts ensued, embarrassing the Russian government by illustrating its dependence on Ukraine to keep everything, including trolley buses and hospitals, running.

    Russia quickly unspooled an undersea cable, but it met only part of the region’s demands. Ukraine then tried to write its claims to sovereignty into a new electrical supply contract, again rubbing in Russia’s inability to power up Crimea.

    The attempt to smuggle in sanctioned generators is the most aggressive Russian move to solve the electrical shortage.

    Rumbling, inefficient diesel generators keep lights on. But they have already cost Kremlin-linked companies a fortune in fuel, adding to the overall cost of integrating the region under sanctions.

    For multinational companies like Siemens, the thicket of restrictions in Russia can be difficult to navigate. Russian local partners have a strong incentive to win favor by skirting the rules while the parent companies have an equally strong incentive to avoid punishing fines.

    And in Russia’s murky legal system, compliance is never certain.
    More: Germany’s Siemens Says Russian Partner Violated Crimea Sanctions

    Also: Siemens to press charges after turbines moved from Russia to Crimea

    They'll pursue legal action in Russia??? Against a Kremlin-backed company??? How fucking naive are these fucking Germans... Jesus...

  7. #7
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    33,310
    Thanks
    19023

    From
    Toronto
    Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak says construction of two power plants in Crimea will go ahead.

    He was asked for comment about the project after Germany's Siemens' said in a statement on Monday that at least two of its gas turbines had been moved "against its will" from Russia to Crimea - a region subject to sanctions barring EU firms providing it with energy technology.

    Novak did not mention the German company by name but said: "The project will be implemented in any case".

    Speaking to reporters on the sidelines of a conference in Istanbul, he added that the Crimea region needed the power plants and the first stations could be launched in the first quarter of 2018
    Crimea power project to go ahead: Russia

    Yep, they don't give a shit what Siemens thinks or says, just as I figured. Just learn a lesson form it, this is a normal risk of doing business with/in Russia

  8. #8
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    33,310
    Thanks
    19023

    From
    Toronto
    (Reuters) - German engineering firm Siemens (SIEGn.DE) has filed lawsuits against a Russian state firm to which it sold turbines, while a Russian Siemens joint venture was only named in court documents for technical reasons, a Siemens spokesman said.

    Court documents seen by Reuters listed state firm Technopromexport (TPE) as a defendant, along with Siemens Gas Turbine Technologies LLC (SGTT), a St Petersburg-based turbine-making joint venture in which Siemens has a majority stake.

    TPE is the firm that originally bought the turbines, saying it intended to install them in a power station in Taman, southern Russia.

    It is also building two power stations in Crimea for which the Siemens-made turbines are intended, according to three sources close to the project. EU firms are forbidden by sanctions from selling energy technology to Crimea.

    The Siemens spokesman said: "All claims in substance go against TPE. However, since we sued as Siemens AG and not as SGTT (who is party to the Taman contract) our Russian legal experts came to the conclusion that technically we also needed to name SGTT."

    The lawsuits were filed on Tuesday in the Moscow city arbitration court, according to the documents seen by Reuters. The documents did not include any details on the reason for the lawsuits.

    (Reporting by Oksana Kobzeva, Gleb Stolyarov, Anastasia Lyrchikova and Georgina Prodhan; Writing by Christian Lowe and Georgina Prodhan; Editing by Dmitry Solovyov and Victoria Bryan)
    Siemens says Crimea turbines claims only against TPE | Reuters

    This, again, won't accomplish anything, since no judge in Russia would ever rule against the wishes and interests of the Kremlin, and that's just a fact. IMHO, they (Siemens) are just showing to their people in the EU that they did not consent to this thing and are not to blame for it

    Not a bad strategy, far as that goes.

  9. #9
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    33,310
    Thanks
    19023

    From
    Toronto
    Germany's ambassador to Moscow said that Russia will have seriously hurt its prospects for investment if it is confirmed that the Siemens-made turbines have been delivered to Crimea, the Interfax news agency reported.

    Siemens had said on Monday it would press criminal charges over the moving of its turbines from Russia to Crimea, and would seek to have them returned to Taman, their original destination.

    "Siemens insists categorically on full compliance with all export control restrictions for itself and also at its partners and customers. In addition, Siemens is evaluating what additional actions are possible," it said.

    An EU spokesman said that implementation and enforcement of the EU sanctions was a matter for the bloc's member states.

    "The (European) Commission is in touch with the German competent authorities on this particular case,” he said.

    The German Committee on Eastern European Economic Relations, which represents German industry in the area, defended Siemens.

    “The sanctions restrictions were strictly followed by the German side,” the committee’s head, Michael Harms, told Reuters. “No German company can afford to be suspected of evading the requirements of the sanctions. Siemens is doing everything to make sure that the restrictions are respected.”

    Siemens made about 1.2 billion euros ($1.4 billion) in sales in Russia last year, roughly 2 percent of its total revenue. It is active there primarily in energy and transportation and has said it indirectly employs 48,000 people in the country.

    Chief Executive Joe Kaeser met President Vladimir Putin several times in his first year after becoming CEO in 2013, and attracted wide criticism for a visit just after Russia's 2014 annexation of Crimea.

    At the time, he reaffirmed his commitment to Russia, where Siemens has been present for almost 170 years and has invested about a billion euros ($1.14 billion) in the past decade, saying the relationship would not be sidetracked by "short-term turbulence".
    Siemens sues Russian state firm over turbines imbroglio

  10. #10
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
    Joined
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    33,310
    Thanks
    19023

    From
    Toronto
    The Siemens gas turbines in Crimea will now most likely be installed in the power plant with some additional Russian components without any guarantee from the German manufacturer. "Normally, Siemens guarantees its own expertise in installation and maintenance, but we will not do it this time," says the company. When asked if the turbines would work anyway, it said that this is like contemplating the future of a car if you have nothing but a motor.
    Siemens sees itself as a victim in the Crimean affair | Business | DW | 11.07.2017

    Oh, well. This is Russia. "No guarantees" is their whole way of life

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Sanctions on Israel?
    By bajisima in forum World Politics
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 10th December 2014, 07:12 PM
  2. What if sanctions backfire?
    By CherryPanda in forum Europe & Russia
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 17th September 2014, 01:10 PM
  3. Sanctions on the US?
    By Dr Sampson Simpson in forum World Politics
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 4th August 2014, 06:02 PM
  4. New Sanctions on Iran
    By Seraphima in forum Asia & Middle East
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22nd November 2011, 03:05 PM
  5. Iran: Sanctions or SCO?
    By Sinopec in forum Warfare
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 5th July 2010, 06:56 AM

Search tags for this page

Click on a term to search for related topics.

Tags for this Thread


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed