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Thread: Dear God...

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    Meh... Majority over there wouldn't agree with you, honestly lol On her being all that hot, I mean. She is called "Horse Face" on Russian forums all the time...



    Well, I am from there originally, so that's why I am interested in the happenings over there, personally.



    Some of these guys really ought to learn to retire at the right moment and go gracefully into old age...
    Agree.

    There's Ahnold, Stallone, Eastwood went past his prime, I did hear Liam Neeson say he was getting out of those roles...

    Chuck Norris, Jackie Chan just came out with a new one, they need to know when to say when.

    It's hard for those guys to admit they can't pull it off anymore.
    Thanks from The Man

  2. #22
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    Russian celebrity and presidential hopeful Ksenia Sobchak’s comments on the status of the annexed Crimean peninsula have reinvigorated a debate in Russian political circles.

    Sobchak last week announced she would run for president in March 2018 elections, which are expected to give Vladimir Putin a fourth term. Sobchak's critics have dismissed her as a "spoiler candidate," included in the campaign for entertainment value.

    During her first press conference since announcing, Sobchak said that “according to international law, Crimea belongs to Ukraine. Period."

    Russia annexed the Black Sea peninsula from Ukraine in March 2014, to widespread international condemnation.

    “We violated our word, we violated the 1994 Budapest Memorandum. We promised and we did not fulfill that promise,” Sobchak said.

    In liberal circles, her comment was received with skepticism. Commentators pointed to earlier posts from Sobchak in which she appeared to support the annexation.

    “All of my friends are against Crimea,” she said on Twitter in March 2014. “I'm alone and proud in believing it was a brilliant political maneuver.”

    In pro-Kremlin circles, however, her recent remarks stirred controversy for a different reason. Russia’s jurisdiction over Crimea “is in no way up for discussion with anyone,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters on Wednesday.

    “This is an incorrect statement in substance and in form,” Peskov was cited as saying by the state-run TASS news agency.

    Crimea’s former Prosecutor General and current State Duma Deputy Natalia Poklonskaya also jumped on the bandwagon.

    "[Sobchak’s words] can only be uttered by a person who can’t see beyond their clubbing circuit and the creative minority,” Poklonskaya told the state-run RIA Novosti news agency on Tuesday. “Surely there is no one by now who doesn’t know that Crimea and Sevastopol are part of Russia?”

    “Literally no world power, not even Belarus, has recognized Crimea’s incorporation into Russia,” Sobchak quipped in response in an Instagram post. “Not even Russia’s [state lender] Sberbank recognizes Crimea as part of Russia."

    In his usual exaggerated style, Liberal Democratic Party (LDPR) leader Vladimir Zhirinovsky described Sobchak’s statement as a crime.

    “She should be jailed for five years,” the RIA Novosti news agency cited Zhirinovsky as telling reporters on Wednesday. “It is nonsense, savagery, and no one will shut her mouth.”

    Asked by reporters whether Sobchak could be held criminally liable for the remarks, Peskov declined to comment.
    Ksenia Sobchak, Who Wants to Be President, Reignites Crimea Controversy

    FWIW, Sobchak is wrong about Belarus, Belarus supported Russia at the UN vote on the status of Crimea


    Although it's true they have played some games with that, on occasion:

    Afghanistan, Cuba, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Kyrgyzstan, Nicaragua, Sudan, Syria, and Zimbabwe have recognised the result of the 2014 referendum in Crimea.[352]

    The position of Belarus is vague: it includes statements made by Alexander Lukashenko that "Ukraine should remain an integral, indivisible, non-aligned state" and "As for Crimea, I do not like it when the integrity and independence of a country are broken", on the one hand, and "Today Crimea is part of the Russian Federation. No matter whether you recognize it or not, the fact remains." and "Whether Crimea will be recognised as a region of the Russian Federation de-jure does not really matter", on the other hand.[353]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annexa...ional_response

    lol Regardless, where it matters, such as at the UN, Lukashenko toes the Russian line

  3. #23
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Weirdo dressed up as a unicorn, of all things, tries to approach Ksenia at campaign event; gets literally thrown out by security

    lol

    This is funny too:

    Ksenia Sobchak, who announced earlier this month that she will run for Russian president next year, might change her name to “Against All,” sources tell the television station Dozhd.

    Sobchak reportedly hopes to use the name change to add an “Against All” option to ballots. One of Dozhd’s sources says she plans to take the hyphenated name: “Ksenia Sobchak – Against All.” Other sources claim Sobchak wants to change her entire name to “Against All.”

    Ksenia Chudinova, the spokesperson for Sobchak’s presidential campaign, told Dozhd that she was aware of no such plans, but described the idea as “super.”

    Whatever Sobchak does, her current name is what will appear on next year’s ballots, if she’s registered as a candidate. According to amendments made to federal legislation last year, any changes made to a candidate’s name within a year of any election will have no bearing on how that candidate’s name is displayed on ballots.

    Sobchak announced her intention to run for president on October 18. She’s presenting herself as a protest candidate, describing a vote for her as a vote “against all.”

    In 2009, Ukrainian businessman Vasily Gumenyuk changed his surname to “Against All” and registered for Ukraine’s 2010 presidential election. He changed his name back after losing the race, winning just 0.16 percent of the vote.
    Ksenia Sobchak is reportedly considering changing her name to ‘Against All’ for next year's presidential race

    She promised, openly, to turn the election into one of her damn reality shows, and she is already doing that lmao

  4. #24
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    MOSCOW — Russian presidential hopeful Ksenia Sobchak urged President Vladimir Putin on Thursday to seek a full investigation of one of the country’s worst hostage crises, but stopped short of blaming him for the deadly raid that ended the standoff 15 years ago.

    Sobchak, a socialite and opposition-leaning TV star who announced her candidacy last week, laid flowers outside the theatre where Russian special forces ended a 57-hour siege by Chechen rebels on Oct. 26, 2002. She made comments portraying Putin as a bystander to the events.

    The siege was widely seen as one of the darkest moments of Putin’s presidency. Many Russians blamed Putin for the heavy death toll among the hostages when Russian special forces stormed the Dubrovka Theater.

    The 41 hostage-takers were killed, but so were at least 127 of the hostages who died from the effects of a narcotic gas that special forces pumped into the building to knock out the militants. Two more died from gunshot wounds.

    Relatives say many of the victims died because they were denied medical help and accuse the Russian government of covering up its role in the carnage. Authorities have consistently refused to disclose the contents of the gas, angering survivors and victims’ relatives.

    “I think that everyone who took part in this operation is responsible,” Sobchak told The Associated Press. “There are many questions, and I think that Vladimir Putin must urge the people who were in charge of the assault to conduct a full public investigation.”
    More: Russia's Sobchak doesn?t blame Putin for 2002 hostage crisis | National Post

    Meanwhile, she continues to mouth off about Crimea:

    YEKATERINBURG/SIMFEROPOL, October 27. /TASS/. Russian TV host Ksenia Sobchak, who just recently declared her presidential ambitions, said that she would not conduct her election campaign in Crimea.

    "I will not electioneer in Crimea, because I believe that it was illegally attached to Russia. As a citizen and politician I see no chance for myself to go to Crimea, for electioneering or for other purpose, except for investigative journalism, which I am going to pause for a while," Sobchak said at a meeting with residents in Yekaterinburg.

    Speaking at a news conference on October 24 Sobchak said that "from the standpoint of international law" Crimea belonged to Ukraine and that by incorporating it Russia violated the Budapest Memorandum of 1994. Some politicians criticized Sobchak for her statement. Liberal Democratic Party leader Vladimir Zhirinovsky urged criminal proceedings against her.
    The speaker of Crimea’s parliament (State Council) Vladimir Konstantinov on Friday criticized Sobchak for her statement about the peninsula’s status.

    "It is a very bad idea to try to capitalize and build one’s election platform on Crimea without proper knowledge of the subject," Konstantinov told the media in Simferopol.

    He also remarked that after Sobchak’s statement most Crimeans lost interest in her as a likely presidential hopeful. "The Crimeans will not support such a candidate, an overwhelming majority [will not support]," he said.
    TASS: Russian Politics & Diplomacy - Russian presidential contender Sobchak says she will not electioneer in Crimea

    She also says a new referendum ought to be held there: Sobchak refused to campaign in the Crimea, proposing to hold a new referendum

    Not that any of this will actually happen. But, again, many observers note, Ksenia is the only one over there who would and has, so far, get away with saying such things, in Russia. Being Putin's Goddaughter has its privileges

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spookycolt View Post
    She's hot, I'd vote for her.
    Nobody is counting no more.
    Thanks from The Man

  6. #26
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    lol So, she has now pissed off millions of Communists, by calling for Lenin's corpse to be removed from the Red Square Mausoleum and finally buried, which, btw, I agree with, along with 58% of Russians, vs. 31% against: Burying Lenin

    But, the Commie Party leadership is now enraged at her, naturally lol

    Gennady Zyuganov, the Communist leader, had a very angry speech about her today


    Insulting the still number two party in the country... Maybe not the brightest idea. If, that is, you ARE actually looking to win this thing, and are not just indeed a stooge to draw away liberal Opposition votes

    Meanwhile, Ivan Urgant, Russian TV's leading comic, made fun of her today in his parody show


  7. #27
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    Russian President Vladimir Putin is currently poised to win a fourth term in the Kremlin if he runs in next year’s election, according to the results of a recent nationwide poll.

    Mr. Putin hasn’t formally thrown his hat into the 2018 race, but the independent Levada Center’s polling published Friday suggests he’s a shoo-in if and when he kick-starts his re-election campaign.

    Of 1,600 adults surveyed, 53 percent said they’d vote for Russia’s current head of state if the presidential election was held this weekend, according to pollsters.
    Roughly 11 percent of respondents said they wouldn’t cast ballots, the Levada Center said. Among those who would vote, however, 66 percent said they’d pick Mr. Putin, The Moscow Times reported.

    None of the other potential presidential hopefuls named by respondents polled past the single digits.
    Putin re-election supported by majority of Russians: Poll

    So... yeah. Miss Sobchak won't be much of a threat, whether she is a stooge or not...

  8. #28
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    Seeing a Stalin t-shirt for sale, former reality television host and presidential candidate Ksenia Sobchak commented on her Instagram account with 5.3 million followers, that Stalin was "unambiguously a bloody executor and criminal."

    "Stalin destroyed the Russian world, we have not managed to restore [it]" and "did everything to throw the country back 100 years," Sobchak wrote.
    News from Russia: What You Missed Over the Weekend

    Oh, boy... First, she trashes Lenin. Now - goes after the Communists' other big hero. Really making herself a big enemy there lol

  9. #29
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    Since the start of his first presidential term in 2000, Mr Putin has built what is known as “managed democracy” — a system that mimics parties, institutions and elections with the Kremlin pulling the strings. Indeed, many in Moscow suspect that Ms Sobchak is running under licence from the president.

    But this year, things look much more complicated. Mr Putin is widely expected to run and win again. But since the constitution allows no more than two consecutive terms and he is already 65, he is likely to start his final six-year term next year. That has fueled speculation that this election will be the start of a transfer of power.

    Moreover, Mr Navalny is seriously disrupting whatever preparations Mr Putin has in the works. The opposition politician has been campaigning for most of this year. Mr Putin, when he eventually announces his candidacy by the official deadline in early December, will be joining a race where the timing and topics have been set by someone else.

    Ms Sobchak makes things even less predictable. Recognisable to 95 per cent of the Russian public and with more than 5m followers on Instagram and more than 1.6m on Twitter, she has suggested she is in a unique position to challenge the president. “There are only two people in this country with that kind of recognition: me and Putin,” she said.

    Using her fame to stir things up is exactly what Ms Sobchak’s campaign has in mind.

    “Of course her candidacy is useful to the Kremlin now, to show that there is pluralism, to pretend that these are real elections,” says Marina Litvinovich, a political consultant who once worked for the Kremlin but has since become a sharp critic of Mr Putin. “But she is a media nuclear weapon. If they are really backing her, they are playing a very, very risky game. People who hear her say these things will start thinking: ‘Oh, so this is allowed?’”

    Alexei Sitnikov, founder of one of Russia’s first political consultancies and someone who takes pride in never having advised Mr Putin in a campaign, sees the Sobchak camp’s main goal to be mobilizing and emboldening the many Russians who are upset with political repression and a lacklustre economy but have stayed silent out of resignation.

    Having worked with Ukrainian politicians Viktor Yushchenko and Yulia Timoshenko during the 2004 Orange Revolution, Mr Sitnikov says he will apply his experience in organising popular movements and helping opposition groups prevail against strong-arm regimes.

    “Let’s be honest, we all know that Putin will win this election,” he says. “But this is to get ready for next time. We are not working to get Ksenia elected, we are working to show those in power that there are many of us. And we are working to convince the people themselves that there are many of them.”

    Most political analysts dismiss the ambitions of Ms Sobchak’s advisers to make her the torch bearer of a popular movement. Many question whether the celebrity is ready to confront Mr Putin. The two have a deep-rooted personal relationship. Mr Putin helped spirit her father Anatoly, the former mayor of St Petersburg and a political patron to Mr Putin, out of the country for emergency medical treatment in 1997 when Mr Sobchak was under criminal investigation.

    Ordinary Russians clearly have their doubts about Ms Sobchak. According to independent pollster Levada, fewer than 1 per cent would vote for her, less than for Mr Navalny. After announcing her candidacy, she became Russia’s least trusted politician, jumping ahead of prime minister Dmitry Medvedev, Mr Navalny, the nationalist veteran Vladimir Zhirinovsky and Communist party chief Gennady Zyuganov.

    However, Russian election experts say it is far too early to judge Ms Sobchak’s role in the presidential election. If her run is seen as too risky, the authorities can keep her from the ballot by stopping her from getting the 300,000 signatures an independent requires to register as a candidate.

    Alternatively, the Kremlin’s political strategists could aim to contrast Mr Putin, the strong, reliable leader needed to defend Russia against a hostile west with a liberal and pro-western Ms Sobchak.
    TV star stirs up Russian politics with run against Putin

  10. #30
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    MOSCOW, November 1. /TASS/. Nearly two-thirds of Russians (64%) hold a negative opinion of Ksenia Sobchak, who recently announced her plans to run for president in the 2018 election, a survey carried out by the All-Russia Public Opinion Research Center showed on Wednesday.

    Ksenia Sobchak, Russian socialite and TV host, announced her plans to throw her hat into the ring for the Russian presidency on October 18. She is the daughter of the late Anatoly Sobchak, St. Petersburg’s first democratically elected mayor, who was once a political mentor to Putin. The presidential election in Russia will take place on March 18, 2018. Sobchak said earlier that her candidacy should be considered as an "against all", or an anti-establishment option.

    Almost 70% of those surveyed see no political prospects for her in the country, and just 6% believe she has good future prospects as a politician, the pollster reported. Some 8% of Russians would vote for Sobchak, and potential support for her is higher among Muscovites and St. Petersburg residents (16%).

    "The attitude to Sobchak is predominantly negative. During the most recent opinion poll, 64% of the respondents, who are familiar with her, felt this way, while the number of positive responses came to 20%," the nation’s leading polling agency said.

    According to the survey, almost every Russian citizen (or 98%) knows about Ksenia Sobchak, and most of them are aware of her presidential ambitions.

    More than half of Russians (57%) believe Sobchak’s presidential bid is merely a publicity stunt. Only 15% of respondents see political motives behind her announcement to run for president, and just 4% said she really seeks to occupy the post.

    "Although over the past years, Ksenia Sobchak has somehow retreated into the shadows, the information effect from her surprising candidacy submission for the Russian president was rather significant. This confirms her reputation as a skilled public speaker and offers chances to perform well on the political arena," All-Russia Public Opinion Research Center Director General Valery Fedorov said.

    The nationwide poll was conducted on October 21-22 based on phone interviews with 1,200 Russian adults. The margin of error does not exceed 3.5% at the 95% confidence level.
    TASS: Society & Culture - More than half of Russians believe Sobchak's presidential run 'just a publicity stunt'

    Meanwhile:

    MOSCOW, November 1. /TASS/. Remarks by TV personality and socialite Ksenia Sobchak that Crimea is Ukrainian soil were seen by residents of the Black Sea peninsula as an affront to their vote cast at the 2014 referendum to become part of Russia, State Duma (lower house of parliament) MP from Crimea and Deputy Chairman of the Nationality Affairs Committee, Ruslan Balbek, said on Wednesday.

    Sobchak earlier stated she plans to toss her hat into the ring for the 2018 presidential election in Russia. She noted that she considers Crimea Ukrainian territory and will not conduct her election campaign there.

    "I can say that this is an affront to Crimea’s residents, because they see the free choice they had made at the historic referendum in Crimea as a delicate issue," Balbek said during a TV link-up organized by the Millet public TV and radio company and the Russian Foreign Ministry. "We communicate with various civil society institutions, NGOs, including religious and national ones. The indignation was indeed tremendous, which means that there is an understanding that this was an affront to Crimeans’ choice to be part of Russia."

    He added that Sobchak’s refusal to come to Crimea indicates that she is aware of people’s response to that.

    For his part, Crimea's Envoy to the Russian President, Georgy Muradov, added that Sobchak’s refusal to electioneer in Crimea was the right step, adding that "she won’t be supported by anyone," but rather she’ll just get ‘bad vibes’ from the entire people of Crimea."
    TASS: Russian Politics & Diplomacy - Lawmaker blasts Sobchak's Crimea statement as 'affront' to peninsula's voters

    Balbek was once a Crimean Tatar dissident in Ukraine, one of the few Tatar figures who was always pro-Russian, and fought against the pro-Kiev Mejlis, organised demonstrations against Dzhemilev and the others

    been arrested for it by the Ukrainians in 2011, even spent time in jail


    After the Russian takeover, first became Deputy Prime Minister of Crimea

    and now - one of Crimea's representatives in the Duma in Moscow


    No question, what Sobchak said pissed him off. I can understand it perfectly. He took it personally...

    Btw, the other new female candidate, Katya Gordon (Second female candidate against Putin?), was just as clear on this point as Sobchak: Gordon called Crimea part of Russia

    "...and anything said otherwise is idle chatter." is how she put it about Sobchak lol Love that lady...

    The Kremlin, btw, has no problem with her participating either, apparently: TASS: Russian Politics & Diplomacy - Kremlin comments on Russian journalist's intention to run for president

    Anyway, already the Commies don;t like Sobchak: TASS: Russian Politics & Diplomacy - Russian Communist leader blasts Sobchak's 'farcical' presidential bid as 'cheap show'

    Zhirinovsky thinks she ought to be thrown in prison for what she said about Crimea: TASS: Russian Politics & Diplomacy - Firebrand MP slams Sobchak's Crimea remark, demanding jail time for socialite

    As you see above, many, if not most, regular folks aren't exactly thrilled about her either. And the election has not even begun yet... But, we shall see what happens.

    Anyway, more:
    Russian TV star challenging Putin for presidency says 'there will be lots of blood' if country changes too fast | The Independent
    What’s wrong with Ksenia Sobchak’s campaign to be Russian president

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