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Thread: Russia #1 source of ISIS fighters

  1. #1
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Russia #1 source of ISIS fighters

    Russia has become the top exporter of fighters who join the ranks of ISIS, according to a new report.

    The assessment from D.C.-based security intelligence consultancy Soufan Group has revised the count of ISIS militants from Tunisia from 6,000 in 2015 to the current number of 2,920. By comparison, Russian nationals who have joined the ranks of the terror group have jumped from 2,400 in 2015 to a current number of approximately 3,417.

    Russian security officials long have been worried about the threat that returning Russian nationals could pose. ISIS even has an affiliate in the country’s North Caucasus region. The extremist group has killed over a dozen security forces in Chechnya in recent years.

    Past ISIS terror plots in both Moscow and St. Petersburg have been foiled by Russian intelligence officers, and their Air Force has been conducting an airstrike campaign against the terror group in Syria.

    Soufan’s report also points out that the overall number of ISIS fighters from foreign lands has increased since its last count in 2015.

    Since the end of 2015, “gateway” countries like Turkey have made greater efforts to stem the flow of jihadis to Iraq and Syria. As a result, “the flow of fighters came to a virtual standstill as the Islamic State began to lose its territory in both Syria and Iraq.”

    A majority of those who traveled to both countries either have been killed, surrendered themselves to enemy forces or have returned home, which has presented security challenges across the West.

    Capping off the top five in the Soufan Group’s report is Saudi Arabia, which increased from 2,500 fighters in 2015 to 3,244. Jordan now has approximately 3,000. Tunisia and France has about 1,910.

    It’s likely that the numbers will not increase from current levels due to the heavy military presence and increased security around Iraq and Syria.

    Some fighters have returned to their native countries. Russia has had 400 return and both Saudi Arabia and Tunisia have seen about 800 return. Nearly half of the 800 British nationals who left the United Kingdom to fight alongside ISIS since have returned.
    Russia 'exports' more ISIS fighters than any other country, report finds | Fox News

    Also read: Thousands of Russians joined Islamic State and brought their children. Now relatives are trying to bring them home - LA Times

    The republic of Dagestan, mentioned in the second linked article, is the number one problem area in Northern Caucasus, and has for years now been the center of underground jihadi activity and the source of many notable terrorist attacks in Russia, such as: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decemb...ograd_bombings

    However, the authorities, both regional and federal, have, by now, succeeded in strangling much of the insurgency there.

    Most of their top leaders have been killed



    Local police maintain a heavily armed presence on the streets



    While FSB special forces continue to often lock down selected communities under "Counterterrorist Operation (KTO) Regime" to sweep for insurgents



    Every month, if not week, the National Antiterrorism Committee website reports about alleged terrorists being identified and liquidated in Dagestan. Very, very rarely are these guys ever taken alive, unless they have some truly valuable intel or something. Human rights organizations accuse the security forces of brutality and killing people based on mere suspicion of involvement in extremism, even, allegedly, planting weapons on bodies of those accused of offering armed resistance (typical explanation for not taking them alive), but who were not even actually armed, according to the human rights folks.

    Regardless, however, this approach does work, this environment is obviously not conducive to organising a successful insurgency. Again, their leaders have been killed, and overall numbers - decimated.

    There have been persistent rumors, connected to the thing with Syria and Iraq: that some insurgency leaders in Dagestan and elsewhere in Northern Caucasus have struck deals with the FSB (who also control Russia's border security, btw, through their Border Defense Forces), for essentially a secession of hostilities, in turn for a safe passage out of the country for any of their people who wanted to go to the Middle East. The FSB essentially let them out, to Syria, where they are now the military's (and no longer their) problem; and to Iraq, for the US, I guess, to deal with... lol Smartass bastards...

    There are still troubles coming out of Dagestan...

    In August, a young man originally from Dagestan stabbed and injured a number of people in the northern Russian city of Surgut, before he was killed by the police; ISIS claimed responsibility: Russia attack: Isis claims responsibility for stabbing rampage in Siberian city of Surgut | The Independent

    And then, you also have the Central Asians. Along with mainly Caucasian Russian citizens, the guys from the ex-Soviet -stans make up the bulk of Russian-speaking ISIS members (there are also guys from Ukraine, but much fewer in number than either of those two groups).

    ISIS' late "minister of war", the Georgian-Chechen Omar al Shishani, was replaced by another ex-Soviet, a former elite officer from Tajikistan, Gulmurod Khalimov

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulmurod_Khalimov

    Millions of people from Tajikistan and elsewhere in Central Asia travel to Russia every year to work in construction

    as well as cleaning, maintenance, agriculture, and in the street markets.

    Inevitably, dangerous radicals end up hidden among them.

    The apparent suicide bomber on the St. Petersburg Metro was from Kyrgyzstan, for example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2017_S..._Metro_bombing

    One must point out that this was the first and, far as I am aware, only successful terrorist attack in Russia involving a Central Asian.

    Nonetheless, thousands of Central Asians have indeed joined ISIS or al Qaeda in Syria. And most, interestingly, came from Russia, not their original home countries.

    This is a point that has been raised numerous times by Central Asian leaders at meetings of military and security commanders of the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO), which unites a number of post-Soviet states

    "Do not blame us", they say, "We do not send you radicals. Our people get radicalized AFTER coming to Moscow or St. Petersburg..."

    Of course, Khalimov's defection was a big blow to that line: Tajikistan special forces chief Gulmurod Khalimov 'joins IS' - BBC News

    The problem is on BOTH sides of the border. All the republics need to work together to deal with it.

    In Moscow specifically, the biggest issue is - too few mosques. Three, four million Muslims living in the city these days, yet only about five mosques to accommodate them.

    Particularly the poor migrant laborers from Central Asia are forced to pray outside, in the streets

    And it has fueled the spread of illegal, underground mosques and prayer rooms, which often preach extremist ideology.

    Muslim spiritual and community leaders keep asking the authorities for permission to build more legitimate mosques. But, whenever talk of a project starts, non-Muslim populace protests vehemently. They demand to preserve the white, Slavic, Orthodox Christian character of the city, and that means they don't want minarets or such in their neighborhoods...

    It's an ongoing issue that won't go anywhere any time soon.

    And the racism from the Slavs (which often manifests in violent hate crimes especially against the Central Asians, who are singled out for "stealing jobs", as well as being Asian Muslims) also likely helps fuel own radicalisation in those communities...

    It's all a big mess over there. Even if ISIS is totally defeated and wiped out in Syria and Iraq, and all the ex-Soviets in their ranks are killed, the issues back home will persist...
    Last edited by The Man; 27th October 2017 at 07:33 AM.

  2. #2
    Mad Genius For Hire Puzzling Evidence's Avatar
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    Wow. Who knew. Thanks, this is some important stuff right here. Hope they can reign this in.
    Thanks from The Man

  3. #3
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    @The Man....can you put a spoiler on the corpse pic? Thanks!!
    Thanks from The Man

  4. #4
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puzzling Evidence View Post
    Wow. Who knew. Thanks, this is some important stuff right here. Hope they can reign this in.
    Me too...

    Quote Originally Posted by HCProf View Post
    @The Man....can you put a spoiler on the corpse pic? Thanks!!
    Done.

  5. #5
    Moderator HCProf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    Me too...



    Done.
    Thanks!! I would have done it myself, but have not mastered that function yet.

  6. #6
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCProf View Post
    Thanks!! I would have done it myself, but have not mastered that function yet.
    No problem

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