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Thread: Putin finally announces Presidency "run"

  1. #1
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Putin finally announces Presidency "run"

    I put the marks around "run", because this ain't gonna be a real election anyway, just a show, where he is predetermined to win, as usual:


    Russia's Vladimir Putin has said he will seek another term as president in next year's election.

    He made the announcement in a speech to workers at a car factory in the Volga city of Nizhny Novgorod.

    "I will put forward my candidacy for the post of president of the Russian federation," he said.

    Mr Putin has been in power since 2000, either as president or prime minister. If he wins the March election he will be eligible to serve until 2024.

    Russian TV journalist Ksenia Sobchak has already said she will stand in the election but opinion polls suggest Mr Putin will win easily.

    Russia's main opposition leader, Alexei Navalny, has been formally barred from standing because he was found guilty of embezzlement - a charge he claims was politically motivated.

    Mr Putin is popular with many Russians, who see him as a strong leader who has restored Russia's global standing with a decisive military intervention in the Syrian civil war and Russia's annexation of Crimea from Ukraine.

    But his critics accuse him of facilitating corruption and illegally annexing Crimea, which has led to international condemnation.
    Russia election: Putin to run again for president - BBC News


    Vladimir Putin on Wednesday announced he is running for the Russian presidency in upcoming elections, seeking a fourth term next year that would extend his rule to 2024.

    Putin, who has dominated politics since first becoming president in 2000, is practically guaranteed to win. A September poll by the independent Levada Center put his approval ratings at 83 percent.

    Next year's elections on March 18 are timed to coincide with the anniversary of Russia's annexation of Crimea from Ukraine — an event which largely consolidated Putin's popularity at home.

    "I will put forward my candidacy for the position of president of the Russian Federation," the Interfax news agency cited Putin as saying during an event in honor of the 85th anniversary of the Gorky car factory GAZ, in Nizhny Novgorod.

    "There's probably no better occasion or place to make this announcement."

    Earlier on Wednesday, Putin was asked by a presenter at an event in Moscow celebrating volunteer work whether he would seek re-election in March.

    “My question to you is: If I take such a decision then will you and people like you support this decision?” the Russian leader replied.

    The audience then erupted in cheers to which Putin said: “This decision will be taken soon and when I make it, I’ll keep in mind this conversation and your response.”



    The announcement came as many Russians were trying to come to terms with an International Olympic Committee ruling banning Russia from the upcoming Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, over allegations of a state-sponsored doping program. Putin has dismissed the accusations of doping as a U.S. attempt to interfere in Russian elections.

    "In response to our supposed interference in their elections, they want to cause problems in the Russian presidential election," he said.

    Putin will face little opposition in the upcoming vote. Communist Party leader Gennady Zyuganov — who has yet to confirm his candidacy — and Liberal Democratic Party (LDPR) leader Vladimir Zhirinovsky have contested and lost several presidential elections.

    Meanwhile, opposition leader Alexei Navalny has been barred from running because of a prior conviction for embezzlement, which his supporters say is politically motivated.

    The only notable newcomer to the electoral race so far has been former reality television star and opposition journalist Ksenia Sobchak, who has been dismissed by pundits as a “spoiler candidate,” whose candidacy is meant to split the opposition vote.
    Putin Announces 2018 Presidential Bid, Surprising No One

    Reactions from some notable Russians: This Is How Russia Is Reacting to Putin's Reelection Bid

    He did also talk about the Olympics:

    Russia will not boycott the upcoming Olympic Games in South Korea, President Vladimir Putin said Wednesday during a visit to the Gorky car plant where he also announced his run for the presidency in March 2018.

    His statement comes a day after the International Olympic Committee (IOC) announced that Russia was banned from participating in the 2018 Winter Games in Pyeongchang due to “systematic manipulation of the anti-doping rules and system.” Russian athletes vetted by an IOC panel will be allowed to compete under a neutral flag.

    Some Russian officials and athletes have called for a boycott of the Games in response.

    "Without a doubt, will not announce any obstacles, we won’t stop our Olympians from taking part, if someone wants to take part in a personal capacity,” Putin was cited as saying by the Interfax news agency.

    Amid criticism that Russia’s leadership has failed to acknowledge any responsibility in the doping scandal, Putin appeared to make a half-apology before hinting that the sanctions are politically motivated.

    "First, it must be said outright, that we are in part to blame for this ourselves because we provided a reason for this,” he said. "And second, I believe that this reason was used in not an entirely honest way, to put it mildly," said Putin.

    "Most of the accusations are based on facts that are not proven at all and are to a significant degree unfounded," Putin added.

    The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) ruled last month that Russia’s anti-doping body had failed to meet international standards for the third year in a row.
    Putin Says Russia Won’t Boycott Olympics, Admits Partial Blame

    Most regular Russians think the IOC decision is politically motivated, though some (well, two of them lol) also agree that it is just: What do Regular Russians Think of the IOC’s Olympic Doping Ban?

    Over 20 Russian athletes are appealing lifetime bans from the Olympics: More Than 20 Russian Olympians Appeal Lifetime Bans

    But this is all unimportant bs. If, or, rather, WHEN, he returns to the Kremlin after the election, I think Putin's number one challenge will be not the Olympics, or Syria, or even Ukraine; but how to deal with his own subordinate governors, as the regions are increasingly challenging Moscow, fighting for more autonomy in local decision making, and a bigger share of their taxes and profits from their resources: Russia’s Regions Strike Back: Provincial Leaders Want More From Moscow (Op-ed)

    In the case of Tatarstan, as mentioned there, they are also pushing the language issue, and same goes on in neighboring Bashkortostan. But that's just the regional leaders exploiting ethnic and cultural divisions to create popular support for themselves. The main thing, as always, is MONEY. Tatarstan, and Bashkortostan too, want to keep more of their oil revenues, basically. They are not alone, many regions are tired of Moscow getting rich, by constantly taking from and leeching off all of them. It's been going on for awhile, and has ribbed off on ordinary folks too, you would find, and I mean among the Slavic, ethnic Russian regions too, when regular people from Moscow come there, in many places they are treated with resentment, sometimes - outright hostility. In many regions, people live in poverty, while all their taxes go to Moscow. And Muscovites, they believe, all live in luxury, on THEIR dime... It is a mistaken stereotype. There are certainly poor people, and poor neighborhoods, in Moscow too. But, on the other hand, even the worst hood in Moscow IS much better off than most industrial towns in Siberia and such. I mean, those are places, I've seen news videos from there, many of those places, they don;t even have fucking street lights. Its completely dark out at night, and few people dare go out, because of horrible crime. Awful places. And Moscow does nothing to help, so, of course they blame Moscow... And Muscovites also don't help, by snobbily looking down upon all who were not born in the city, referring to them derisively as "limita" (meaning, basically, human trash from outside the city limits).

    Basically, once he returns, Putin will have two big choices:

    1. Placate the regions, which would include redistributing more wealth and resources towards them.

    or.

    2. Go to war with the governors, kick them back in line, through brute force.

    The FSB has no problem arresting a sitting governor, as they have already demonstrated on numerous occasions

    Pretty much any governor in Russia today has something in his past, near or far, for which he deserves to be arrested. Nobody here as clean, anybody in high level politics is corrupt. The system actually essentially weeds out people who are too honest and honorable. They don't want such people. They want dirty ones, who, if necessary, can be arrested on a moment's notice, that's why FSB keeps "kompromat" on everyone in powerful positions in every region.

    The problem is, this is not coming from the governors. Yes, they are exploiting it for own political and financial gain. But, ultimately, this is coming from regular people. If the final response from the capital is a crackdown, this will just create more resentment. Putin will lose more support among the provincials, and the rural folks. And he NEEDS this support. He is actually pretty weak in Moscow itself as is. Moscow is where there are the many educated and relatively liberal and progressive people, the students, the hipsters, the intelligentsia, who support the Opposition, Navalny, Kasparov, etc.


    Opposition candidates won many municipal council seats in Moscow just in September: Opposition Candidates Win More Than 270 Seats in Moscow Municipal Elections

    In 2013, Navalny scored a whopping 27% of the vote in the Moscow Mayor Election, even in spite of the obvious rigging in favor of Putin's man, Sergey Sobyanin: Alexei Navalny Scores High Result in Moscow Mayor Elections - SPIEGEL ONLINE

    I have heard it said that if that election was NOT rigged, Navalny would be Mayor of Moscow today...

    The working classes in the provinces are his traditional support base


    Yet, already, Navalny for example, is able to go to provincial cities, like Murmansk, and raise large crowds of mostly young people

    He talks about exactly what they want to hear: the corruption in Moscow, the officials there hogging all their tax money for themselves and spending it on luxurious villas and yachts and jets and diamonds for their girlfriends...

    Basically, if Putin does not address, popular discontent will rise in the provinces. And that will be much harder for him to put down, than some university kids in Moscow... I hope he is paying attention.

  2. #2
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    Trump will be so happy!
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  3. #3
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly5 View Post
    Trump will be so happy!
    I am sure he will lol

  4. #4
    Flibbertigibbet Wonderer's Avatar
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    Ahahahahahahaha. "Run." Nice one, Vlad!
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  5. #5
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Opinion polls show Vladimir Putin is already a shoo-in to win a fourth presidential term. But a ban on Russia taking part in the Winter Olympics is likely to make support for him even stronger, by uniting voters around his message: The world is against us.

    Putin, who has dominated Russia's political landscape for the last 17 years, declared Wednesday that he will run in March's presidential election.

    With ties between the Kremlin and the West at their lowest point for years, the International Olympic Committee's decision to bar Russia from the 2018 Pyeongchang Games over doping is seen in Moscow as a humiliating and politically tinged act.

    Konstantin Kosachyov, head of the upper house of parliament's foreign affairs committee, was among the first to cast the move as part of a dark Western plot against his country, which sees sport as a barometer of geopolitical clout.

    "There can be no doubt that this is part of the West's overall policy of holding Russia back," Kosachyov wrote on social media. "They are targeting our national honor ... our reputation ... and our interests. They (the West) bought out the traitors ... and orchestrated media hysteria."

    The IOC ruling is also seen by many in Russia as a personal affront to Putin, who was re-elected president in 2012 after spending four years as prime minister because the constitution barred him from a third consecutive term as head of state.

    The sport-loving leader cast his hosting of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, at which the IOC says there was "unprecedented systematic manipulation" of the anti-doping system, as a symbol of Russia's success under his rule.

    But Putin has often extracted political benefit from crises, and turned international setbacks into domestic triumphs, by accusing the West of gunning for Russia and using this to inspire Russians to unite.

    "Outside pressure on Russia, understood as politically-motivated and orchestrated from the U.S., leads to more national cohesion," Dmitri Trenin, director of the Carnegie Moscow Center, said on Wednesday.

    "Various sanctions are being turned into instruments of nation-building."

    Putin's popularity, supported by state television, is already high. Opinion polls regularly give him an approval rating of around 80 percent.

    But casting the IOC ban as a dastardly Western plot to hurt Russia, something he did when Russian athletes were banned from last year's Summer Olympics in Rio over doping, could help him mobilize the electorate.

    Public anger over the IOC move could help Putin overcome signs of voter apathy and ensure a high turnout which, in the tightly controlled limits of the Russian political system, is seen as conferring legitimacy.

    There were early signs that fury over the IOC's decision was duly stirring patriotic fervor.

    "Russia is a superpower," Alexander Kudrashov, a member of the Russian Military Historical Society, told Reuters on Moscow's Red Square after the IOC ruling.

    Without Russia, he said, the Olympics would not be valid. He linked the decision to a Western anti-Russian campaign which many Russians believe took hold after Russia annexed the Crimea peninsula from Ukraine in 2014.

    "Choosing between the people in Crimea, who wept when the Russian flag was run up and who were doomed to genocide, and sportspeople taking first place on the podium, I choose the people who couldn't defend themselves," Kudrashov said.
    Much more: Russia's Olympic ban strengthens Putin's reelection hand

    Yep... He is a survivor, I'll give him that. He can masterfully turn, as the article says, setbacks abroad into awesome propaganda at home. And the Russians' own innate crazy nationalism and fanatic pride only help him with this.

    Shit... Another six years. That's gonna be, all in all, 25 years of his rule, counting 1999 when he was Prime Minister and Yeltsin was practically a vegetable by then and he was already making all the decisions... Stalin himself ruled for 29 years (since 1924, when Lenin died and he assumed full power, till his death in 1953). Putin may surpass even him...

  6. #6
    Established Member Blues63's Avatar
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    He just switches from President to Prime Minister in order to remain a dictator under the constitution.
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  7. #7
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blues63 View Post
    He just switches from President to Prime Minister in order to remain a dictator under the constitution.
    Yep. And, before he went to PM and gave the Presidency to Medvedev, he actually made a decree, basically transferring most of the powers of the Presidency to the Prime Minister's office. And then, when he went back to President, he just transferred him back. Crazy...
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  8. #8
    Thought Provocateur NightSwimmer's Avatar
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    I assume that his poll numbers are YUGE!
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  9. #9
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NightSwimmer View Post
    I assume that his poll numbers are YUGE!
    Yep... Many young people, again, support Navalny

    Actually, it's mostly young people who support him.

    Problem is, few of the young vote over there


    Same as here in Canada, actually, I have often found myself the only person under, like, 40, at polling stations... It's a shame...

  10. #10
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Gorby endorses Putin:

    The last Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev commented on Putin's announcement on Wednesday, focusing on Putin's prolonged popularity.

    "If the people believe it is possible and necessary for the current president to put forward his candidacy once again, that means this should happen," he told Interfax.

    "The situation in our country is still complicated, there are many important issues to solve," he added. "And this option of Vladimir Putin going for another term is fully permissible."

    At the same time, the veteran leader said it was important to make sure that governments were replaceable. "However, nobody has negated this principle yet," Gorbachev concluded.
    Russia's Vladimir Putin says he will run for president again in 2018



    Fun fact: back in 1994, the disgraced ex-President of USSR came to newly re-renamed St. Petersburg, and the governor there, Anatoly Sobchak, Putin's mentor and protege, didn't bother to even meet with him. Who did he send in his place? Why, his loyal assistant




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