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Thread: UN demands Russia leave Transnistria

  1. #21
    Radical Centrist BigLeRoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    Tatars we're transplants in Crimea also. Their home is Central Asia someplace. Original Crimeans are Greeks. Who, BTW, are still there, and are asking Russia to rename the place now: Renaming Crimea

    lol
    Original Crimeans?!? Well, the Greeks certainly colonized Crimea, and brought their wonderful civilization there with them, but there were already people there! So the Greeks were not the ORIGINAL inhabitants!!


    In fact, the original inhabitants might well have been Neanderthals. Those are the earliest remains we have from the Crimea. The Crimea may have even been one of the last holdouts of the Neanderthals.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Crimea

    From the link: Archaeological evidence of human settlement in Crimea dates back to the Middle Paleolithic. Neanderthal remains found at Kiyik-Koba Cave have been dated to about 80,000 BP.[1] Late Neanderthal occupations have also been found at Starosele (c. 46,000 BP) and Buran Kaya III (c. 30,000 BP).[2]

    Archaeologists have found some of the earliest anatomically modern human remains in Europe in the Buran-Kaya caves in the Crimean Mountains (east of Simferopol). The fossils are about 32,000 years old, with the artifacts linked to the Gravettian culture.[3][4] During the Last Glacial Maximum, along with the northern coast of the Black Sea in general, Crimea was an important refuge from which north-central Europe was re-populated after the end of the Ice Age. The East European Plain during this time was generally occupied by periglacial loess-steppe environments, although the climate was slightly warmer during several brief interstadials and began to warm significantly after the beginning of the Late Glacial Maximum. Human site occupation density was relatively high in the Crimean region and increased as early as ca. 16,000 years before the present.[5]

    Proponents of the Black Sea deluge hypothesis believe Crimea did not become a peninsula until relatively recently, with the rising of the Black Sea level in the 6th millennium BC.

    The beginning of the Neolithic in Crimea is not associated with agriculture, but instead with the beginning of pottery production, changes in flint tool-making technologies, and local domestication of pigs. The earliest evidence of domesticated wheat in the Crimean peninsula is from the Chalcolithic Ardych-Burun site, dating to the middle of the 4th millennium BC[6]

    By the 3rd millennium BC, Crimea had been reached by the Yamna or "pit grave" culture, assumed to correspond to a late phase of Proto-Indo-European culture in the Kurgan hypothesis.

    Tauri and Scythians

    In the early Iron Age, Crimea was settled by two groups: the Tauri (or Scythotauri) in southern Crimea, and the East Iranian-speaking Scythians north of the Crimean Mountains.

    The origins of the Tauri, from which the classical name of Crimea as Taurica arose, are unclear. They are possibly a remnant of the Cimmerians displaced by the Scythians. Alternative theories relate them to the Abkhaz and Adyghe peoples, which at that time resided much farther west than today.

    The Greeks, who eventually established colonies in Crimea during the Archaic Period, regarded the Tauri as a savage, warlike people. Even after centuries of Greek and Roman settlement, the Tauri were not pacified and continued to engage in piracy on the Black Sea.[7] By the 2nd century BC they had become subject-allies of the Scythian king Scilurus.
    Last edited by BigLeRoy; 23rd June 2018 at 05:46 PM.
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  2. #22
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigLeRoy View Post
    Romania seems to be quite a bit better off than Moldova. This site gives a real GDP per capita for Romania of $9519.88:

    https://tradingeconomics.com/romania/gdp-per-capita

    The same site gives a real GDP per capita for Moldova of ONLY $1900.20, which is poorer than several sub-Saharan African countries!
    What I meant is, Romania is the poorest, still, among actual European, EU countries, although Greece or Bulgaria could probably complete with them in that. Or Albania, probably.

    Moldova is among the poorest even among the (much poorer on average than Europe) ex-Soviet countries.

  3. #23
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigLeRoy View Post
    Original Crimeans?!? Well, the Greeks certainly colonized Crimea, and brought their wonderful civilization there with them, but there were already people there! So the Greeks were not the ORIGINAL inhabitants!!


    In fact, the original inhabitants might well have been Neanderthals. Those are the earliest remains we have from the Crimea. The Crimea may have even been one of the last holdouts of the Neanderthals.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Crimea

    From the link: Archaeological evidence of human settlement in Crimea dates back to the Middle Paleolithic. Neanderthal remains found at Kiyik-Koba Cave have been dated to about 80,000 BP.[1] Late Neanderthal occupations have also been found at Starosele (c. 46,000 BP) and Buran Kaya III (c. 30,000 BP).[2]

    Archaeologists have found some of the earliest anatomically modern human remains in Europe in the Buran-Kaya caves in the Crimean Mountains (east of Simferopol). The fossils are about 32,000 years old, with the artifacts linked to the Gravettian culture.[3][4] During the Last Glacial Maximum, along with the northern coast of the Black Sea in general, Crimea was an important refuge from which north-central Europe was re-populated after the end of the Ice Age. The East European Plain during this time was generally occupied by periglacial loess-steppe environments, although the climate was slightly warmer during several brief interstadials and began to warm significantly after the beginning of the Late Glacial Maximum. Human site occupation density was relatively high in the Crimean region and increased as early as ca. 16,000 years before the present.[5]

    Proponents of the Black Sea deluge hypothesis believe Crimea did not become a peninsula until relatively recently, with the rising of the Black Sea level in the 6th millennium BC.

    The beginning of the Neolithic in Crimea is not associated with agriculture, but instead with the beginning of pottery production, changes in flint tool-making technologies, and local domestication of pigs. The earliest evidence of domesticated wheat in the Crimean peninsula is from the Chalcolithic Ardych-Burun site, dating to the middle of the 4th millennium BC[6]

    By the 3rd millennium BC, Crimea had been reached by the Yamna or "pit grave" culture, assumed to correspond to a late phase of Proto-Indo-European culture in the Kurgan hypothesis.

    Tauri and Scythians

    In the early Iron Age, Crimea was settled by two groups: the Tauri (or Scythotauri) in southern Crimea, and the East Iranian-speaking Scythians north of the Crimean Mountains.

    The origins of the Tauri, from which the classical name of Crimea as Taurica arose, are unclear. They are possibly a remnant of the Cimmerians displaced by the Scythians. Alternative theories relate them to the Abkhaz and Adyghe peoples, which at that time resided much farther west than today.

    The Greeks, who eventually established colonies in Crimea during the Archaic Period, regarded the Tauri as a savage, warlike people. Even after centuries of Greek and Roman settlement, the Tauri were not pacified and continued to engage in piracy on the Black Sea.[7] By the 2nd century BC they had become subject-allies of the Scythian king Scilurus.
    Yes, the Scythians were there also, sure.

    But, that civilization is long gone, albeit they have certainly left lots of beautiful artifacts all over Russia, from Crimea all the way to areas in Siberia!

    The Greeks are the oldest ethnic group in Crimea who STILL exist there, let's put it this way
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  4. #24
    Radical Centrist BigLeRoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    What I meant is, Romania is the poorest, still, among actual European, EU countries, although Greece or Bulgaria could probably complete with them in that. Or Albania, probably.

    Moldova is among the poorest even among the (much poorer on average than Europe) ex-Soviet countries.
    Moldova is not in the European Union, but they are certainly in Europe! I looked up almost all the GDP per capita numbers for the countries in the Balkans. You may find this of interest. Greece is actually, by far, the best off of all those nations. They rank as follows:

    1. Greece: $22736

    2. Romania: $10080 (corrected number from my first post)

    3. Bulgaria: $7929

    4. Montenegro: $7455

    5. Serbia: $5852

    6. North Macedonia (new name!): $5223

    7. Albania: $4712

    8. Kosovo: $3890

    9. Moldova: $2063 (corrected number from first post).

    So, Kosovo is the poorest other than Moldova. Not really surprising.
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  5. #25
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigLeRoy View Post
    Moldova is not in the European Union, but they are certainly in Europe! I looked up almost all the GDP per capita numbers for the countries in the Balkans. You may find this of interest. Greece is actually, by far, the best off of all those nations. They rank as follows:

    1. Greece: $22736

    2. Romania: $10080 (corrected number from my first post)

    3. Bulgaria: $7929

    4. Montenegro: $7455

    5. Serbia: $5852

    6. North Macedonia (new name!): $5223

    7. Albania: $4712

    8. Kosovo: $3890

    9. Moldova: $2063 (corrected number from first post).

    So, Kosovo is the poorest other than Moldova. Not really surprising.
    lol Yeah, I forgot Kosovo... Now THERE is the biggest shithole in the Balkans... I went to school, here in Canada, with two guys, a Serb and an Albanian, both originally from around there (and yes, believe it or not, somehow I was able to be friends with both of them lmao). Both said it was a shithole even before the whole conflict there...
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  6. #26
    Radical Centrist BigLeRoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigLeRoy View Post
    Moldova is not in the European Union, but they are certainly in Europe! I looked up almost all the GDP per capita numbers for the countries in the Balkans. You may find this of interest. Greece is actually, by far, the best off of all those nations. They rank as follows:

    1. Greece: $22736

    2. Romania: $10080 (corrected number from my first post)

    3. Bulgaria: $7929

    4. Montenegro: $7455

    5. Serbia: $5852

    6. North Macedonia (new name!): $5223

    7. Albania: $4712

    8. Kosovo: $3890

    9. Moldova: $2063 (corrected number from first post).

    So, Kosovo is the poorest other than Moldova. Not really surprising.
    Here's a few I forgot to look up on the first pass:

    Slovenia: $24357, a bit better off than Greece, Slovenia was always the most prosperous part of the former Yugoslavia, the most prosperous part of the entire Balkan region, really, fully integrated into the Central European economy (Austria, Hungary, and northern Italy, especially).

    Croatia: $14372, would rank ahead of Romania but well behind Greece.

    Bosnia: $5306, one of the poorer nations but not at the bottom.
    Thanks from The Man

  7. #27
    Nuisance Factor Yeti 8 Jungle Swing Champion, YetiSports 4 - Albatross Overload Champion, YetiSports7 - Snowboard FreeRide Champion, Alu`s Revenge Champion boontito's Avatar
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    The motion was passed on June 22 by a vote of 64-15, with 83 abstentions.
    More countries abstained (83) than voted (79). Gee, thanks for showing up, guys.

    Moldova, Georgia, Canada, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Ukraine, and Estonia drafted the resolution.
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  8. #28
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    BTW, the Macedonians have already accepted the new name??? I thought their President was threatening to veto it, and people were also protesting against it on the streets as well?

  9. #29
    The Un-Holy One The Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boontito View Post
    More countries abstained (83) than voted (79). Gee, thanks for showing up, guys.



    Canada keeps getting involved there. Foolishly, IMHO. This is not our region and not our fight.

  10. #30
    Radical Centrist BigLeRoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Man View Post
    lol Yeah, I forgot Kosovo... Now THERE is the biggest shithole in the Balkans... I went to school, here in Canada, with two guys, a Serb and an Albanian, both originally from around there (and yes, believe it or not, somehow I was able to be friends with both of them lmao). Both said it was a shithole even before the whole conflict there...
    Heh, careful. You're starting to sound like Donald Trump.
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