A Question About the GA Governor's Race

Sep 2014
4,212
1,215
South FL
#15
It is apparent that some shenanigans went on in relation to Kemp and the governor's race. Can the US Congress investigate that?
The answer is unequivocally yes. Congress' main function of course is to pass legislation and naturally pursuant to that they can actually look into things and investigate them. With respect to elections the XV Amendment in Section 2 expressly vests authority in Congress with the 'power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.'
 
Likes: Babba

Rasselas

Former Staff
Feb 2010
66,653
41,924
valid location
#19
The answer is unequivocally yes. Congress' main function of course is to pass legislation and naturally pursuant to that they can actually look into things and investigate them. With respect to elections the XV Amendment in Section 2 expressly vests authority in Congress with the 'power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.'
The SCOTUS set the bar for this pretty high when it gutted the CRA. There's nothing in Amendment XV that prevents a state government from preventing someone from voting because they are likely to vote the wrong way. Can a political party in power use that power to suppress or discount the votes of people who likely support the other party? That's what the gerrymandering question is all about, and SCOTUS has never denied any party the ability to disable the voting power of their political opponents.
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
57,411
45,048
CA
#20
Does sound like the Georgia voting system/infrastructure is pretty antiquated. Needs updated if possible. (Available money is often the issue in those cases.)

Believed it is quite common that candidates defer from resigning their current offices until/unless they actually win the office they are attempting to acquire.

Polling stations get closed (or opened) for a variety of reasons. Expense and practicality typically the motivation. Although nefarious allegations are popular/common. Am suspecting there are documented basis' for why the actions were taken. Probably good to at least read those before the "investigation" is unleashed.




..
Kemp has a LONG history with those voting machines


Labelling elections as critical infrastructure, Kemp declared, opened the door for the federal government to “subvert the Constitution to achieve the goal of federalizing elections under the guise of security.” Georgia is one of only five states that uses voting machines that create no paper record, and thus cannot be audited, and the Center for American Progress has given it a D grade for election security. But, when D.H.S. offered cybersecurity assistance, Kemp spoke out against it. (Georgia has since accepted some help from D.H.S.) “It seems like now it’s just the D.C. media and the bureaucrats, because of the D.N.C. getting hacked—they now think our whole system is on the verge of disaster because some Russian’s going to tap into the voting system,” Kemp said at the time. “And that’s just not—I mean, anything is possible, but it is not probable at all, the way our systems are set up.”

And yet, as it turned out, that was exactly the way the system in Georgia was set up. We know this because, a few days before Kemp blasted the D.H.S. and dismissed the D.N.C. hack, a young security researcher in Georgia named Logan Lamb began poking around the Web site of Kennesaw State University’s Center for Election Systems, looking for vulnerabilities. The Center was under contract with the Georgia secretary of state’s office—Kemp’s office—to program and test all the voting machines in the state, train state election workers, and distribute the state’s electronic voter-registration database to the counties. With the entire state election system housed in one place, the Center was a high-value, potentially vulnerable target. Lamb, who worked for an Internet-security company called Bastille, wanted to find out how vulnerable.

On the Center’s Web site, Lamb quickly discovered a trove of unsecured files—fifteen gigabytes’ worth. Among the files were lists of passwords that would allow election workers to sign into a central server on Election Day, and the systems that prepared ballots and tabulated votes. He also found software for the state’s “poll books,” electronic databases that are often used to verify people’s eligibility to vote, as well as a security hole through which he could download the entire database of the state’s 6.7 million registered voters. The files had been publicly exposed for so long that they were cached on Google. He also saw that the Center had failed to fix a well-known glitch in its content-management system through which hackers could take control of the site. A patch for this issue had been publicly available for two years.

Trump, Election Hacking, and the Georgia Governor’s Race
 

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