Aerators In Chesapeake Bay Could Eliminate Dead Zones.

Mar 2015
29,711
15,226
Mad Prophet
#1
COLUMBIA, Md. (WJZ) — What if the dead zones that plague the Chesapeake Bay could be eliminated?

One local man thinks it could be done with a $2 million pilot program to put aerators in the bay.

Dan Sheer, founder of Hydrologics drives his boat up Rock Creek where aerators have been used since 1988. It’s a solution he thinks could help get rid of the dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay.

“They pump air of concentrated oxygen into the bottom of the bay where it dissolves into the water from the bubbles,” Sheer said.

He said dead zones are parts of the bay without oxygen, produced when algae blooms, fed by excessive nutrients and consume the dissolved oxygen that fish, crabs and shellfish need to live.

His idea is to lay 15 pipes across the deepest part of the Chesapeake at five-mile intervals from Maryland bay to the Potomac River with a series of openings in them to release streams of tiny air bubbles.

 

Tedminator

Former Staff
Jun 2010
27,206
19,542
South Florida
#3
His idea is to lay 15 pipes across the deepest part of the Chesapeake at five-mile intervals from Maryland bay to the Potomac River with a series of openings in them to release streams of tiny air bubbles.
whaat? would'nt that get clogged up with silt etc after awhile? :think:
 
Mar 2015
29,711
15,226
Mad Prophet
#4
whaat? would'nt that get clogged up with silt etc after awhile? :think:
We already have them in Rock creek. They seem to work fine.

Bubble, Bubble: A Community's Fix for Bad Smells Offers a Unique Research Opportunity


Zachary GotthardtJune 20, 2017
On a small tributary of the Patapsco River in Pasadena, Maryland, an avid community of fishermen and boaters frequent the waters daily during the spring and summer. This river, Rock Creek, is home to the Maryland Yacht club and sees a high volume of boat traffic. Due to its recreational and economic relevance, this waterway is central to the community of Pasadena. Although it appears to be an otherwise typical Chesapeake Bay community, Rock Creek is home to a fascinating story where science, natural resource management, and the local community come together. My thesis project takes place at that crossroads.
Approximately 80 percent of the Rock Creek watershed is residential area, and about half the homes in this area use septic systems for waste removal. Some of the tidal waters entering Rock Creek flow there via the Patapsco River from Baltimore, a city with a history of high water pollution. Water entering from the Patapsco River tends to stagnate, as water can sit in Rock Creek for a relatively long time (about 13 to 32 days) before being flushed out. Unfortunately, these features of the tributary lead to poor water quality. In the 1980s, community residents saw massive fish kills and became annoyed by the frequent smell of rotting eggs. Some residents claim that the concentration of hydrogen sulfide in air near the creek was so high that paint had begun to peel off houses.


The aerators of Rock Creek, Pasadena, Maryland, create a swirl of bubbles at the surface. When fully operational, the aerators pump over 15,000 liters of air per minute into the water. Photo credit: Nicole Lehming

Bubble, Bubble: A Community's Fix for Bad Smells Offers a Unique Research Opportunity
 
Jul 2019
1,606
1,468
Atlanta
#5
COLUMBIA, Md. (WJZ) — What if the dead zones that plague the Chesapeake Bay could be eliminated?

One local man thinks it could be done with a $2 million pilot program to put aerators in the bay.

Dan Sheer, founder of Hydrologics drives his boat up Rock Creek where aerators have been used since 1988. It’s a solution he thinks could help get rid of the dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay.

“They pump air of concentrated oxygen into the bottom of the bay where it dissolves into the water from the bubbles,” Sheer said.

He said dead zones are parts of the bay without oxygen, produced when algae blooms, fed by excessive nutrients and consume the dissolved oxygen that fish, crabs and shellfish need to live.

His idea is to lay 15 pipes across the deepest part of the Chesapeake at five-mile intervals from Maryland bay to the Potomac River with a series of openings in them to release streams of tiny air bubbles.

This is very cool. Aren't algae blooms caused by fertilizer run off?
 
Mar 2015
29,711
15,226
Mad Prophet
#7
This is very cool. Aren't algae blooms caused by fertilizer run off?
Good point. Yes, but because the algae sucks the oxygen out of the water. You can still oxygenate the water in spite of the algae.

These are the three basic forms of Algae blooms.
  • Planktonic
  • Filamentous
  • Macrophytes
There are four basic ways to remove algae blooms.
  1. Chemicals
  2. Aeration
  3. Mixing
  4. Ultrasound
2. Aeration

Aeration is used to increase the level of oxygen in the water. Aeration is an environmentally friendly technique to maintain and rejuvenate water bodies. To eliminate chemical use and create a healthy ecosystem, aeration systems can be used. It is important to maintain healthy levels of dissolved oxygen in your pond because the oxygen aids in the breakdown of decaying vegetation and other nutrients that find their way into the water.

This breakdown of the bottom silt is carried out by microorganisms where the water meets the soil. The decomposition is carried out by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Aerobic decomposition requires a continuous supply of oxygen and proceeds more rapidly as dissolved oxygen concentrations are near saturation levels. The primary result of aerobic bacteria decomposition is carbon dioxide. Anaerobic decomposition is slower than aerobic decomposition, and the end products are organic compounds such as alcohols and foul-smelling organic acids.
 
Likes: BigLeRoy
Jul 2019
1,606
1,468
Atlanta
#8
Good point. Yes, but because the algae sucks the oxygen out of the water. You can still oxygenate the water in spite of the algae.

These are the three basic forms of Algae blooms.
  • Planktonic
  • Filamentous
  • Macrophytes
There are four basic ways to remove algae blooms.
  1. Chemicals
  2. Aeration
  3. Mixing
  4. Ultrasound
2. Aeration

Aeration is used to increase the level of oxygen in the water. Aeration is an environmentally friendly technique to maintain and rejuvenate water bodies. To eliminate chemical use and create a healthy ecosystem, aeration systems can be used. It is important to maintain healthy levels of dissolved oxygen in your pond because the oxygen aids in the breakdown of decaying vegetation and other nutrients that find their way into the water.

This breakdown of the bottom silt is carried out by microorganisms where the water meets the soil. The decomposition is carried out by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Aerobic decomposition requires a continuous supply of oxygen and proceeds more rapidly as dissolved oxygen concentrations are near saturation levels. The primary result of aerobic bacteria decomposition is carbon dioxide. Anaerobic decomposition is slower than aerobic decomposition, and the end products are organic compounds such as alcohols and foul-smelling organic acids.
Yeah and the water exchange is those creeks and rivers is slow, isn't it?
 
Mar 2015
29,711
15,226
Mad Prophet
#9
Yeah and the water exchange is those creeks and rivers is slow, isn't it?
I'm not sure what you are asking. I can only speak for the Chesapeake, these main bodies of the river are typically slow-moving estuary and low salinity. They have low oxygen and high temperatures in the summertime. As well, we are now finding evidence of flesh-eating bacteria in our bay - incredibly disconcerting.

The good news is that higher oxygen = more money for crabbers, oyster trawlers, charter boat captains, revenue from tackle sales, etc.
 
Jul 2019
1,606
1,468
Atlanta
#10
I'm not sure what you are asking. I can only speak for the Chesapeake, these main bodies of the river are typically slow-moving estuary. They have low oxygen and high temperatures in the summertime. As well, we are now finding evidence of flesh-eating bacteria.
Oh God.. that too?
Water exchange is how long it takes for water move around the system. Like the Red Sea takes several weeks. And the Bay of Fundy is like a giant flush toilet.