Ahmed's Clock - False, Convenient Tale of Racism

Dec 2014
17,091
6,139
The Milky Way
#1
How Ahmed's clock became a false, convenient tale of racism | New York Post


...

The police overreacted. Yet the device did look like something Ethan Hunt would lob out of a helicopter at the last minute in “Mission: Impossible.” As National Review’s Charles Cooke pointed out on Twitter, the scary-looking tangle of wires “looks a lot more like a bomb than a pop tart looks like a gun.”

Josh Welch, a white Maryland kid with ADHD who was 7 years old when he was kicked out of school for chewing a Pop-Tart into the shape of a pistol and pretending to shoot other students with it, must be puzzled.

Where’s his White House invitation? Where’s his chance to start networking at Facebook? His parents were forced to hire a lawyer and spent a year and a half just trying to get the suspension erased from the kid’s record. They were repeatedly refused.

“I stand with Ahmed, too. But I also stand with Alex Stone,” noted Reason writer Robby Soave. Alex Stone, a 16-year-old white kid from Summerville, SC, wrote a short story in which he imagined using a gun to kill a dinosaur. For this his locker was searched and he was arrested, handcuffed, charged with “disorderly conduct” and suspended from school for three days.

Obviously the White House and Mark Zuckerberg couldn’t be bothered to comment, but you’d think that, at the very least, Stephen King would have sent out a tweet expressing outrage that imagination was being punished.

...

“It never would have happened to a white kid”? It happens to white kids all. The. Time.

The main difference between the Ahmed Mohamed case and the others is that the mainstream media and the leftist point of view it presents just can’t let go of Ahmed. Ahmed is too useful to their narrative to be a one-day story.

...


 
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Jul 2013
40,386
26,478
On a happy trail
#2
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Singularity

Former Staff
Oct 2009
33,058
27,427
Kansas
#4
Racism is beside the point for me to this one.

Police were called when they didn't have to be; the kid followed instructions from one teacher and another teacher chose to freak out.

When the police arrived, they violated the law by refusing to allow the parents to be informed and by interrogating a minor without guardian or counsel.

The first factor is questionable, with fault possibly assigned in part of all parties. The second is unacceptable.
 
Likes: 5 people

Rasselas

Former Staff
Feb 2010
71,055
47,930
USA
#5
It's a clock! It's a fucking clock!

The only question is this: If the kid had been a WASP, like my kid, would anyone have freaked out? Or if one person did, would anyone take that teacher seriously?

Answer: doubt it. Why? Because kids bring stuff like this to school with them all the time and people don't freak out.
 
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Sep 2011
24,999
17,444
aMEEErica
#7
It's a clock! It's a fucking clock!

The only question is this: If the kid had been a WASP, like my kid, would anyone have freaked out? Or if one person did, would anyone take that teacher seriously?

Answer: doubt it. Why? Because kids bring stuff like this to school with them all the time and people don't freak out.
And how the hell would you know?

Was it put together with library paste?

That could have very well been a bomb and you would never know it until it blew up in your face.

Thx :)
 
Likes: 1 person

Singularity

Former Staff
Oct 2009
33,058
27,427
Kansas
#8
It's a clock! It's a fucking clock!

The only question is this: If the kid had been a WASP, like my kid, would anyone have freaked out? Or if one person did, would anyone take that teacher seriously?

Answer: doubt it. Why? Because kids bring stuff like this to school with them all the time and people don't freak out.
In all reasonable judgment, a series of basic questions should have been asked:

Was the teacher who called police the first school staffer to see the device? If not, who did? What did that person tell Ahmed to do? Just keep it in his bag? OK. That's it.
 
Likes: 1 person

Djinn

Council Hall
Dec 2007
51,646
38,450
Pennsylvania, USA
#9
And the underneath of my kitchen sink looks a lot more like a bomb than any of those examples. OMG I just noticed that a wire is even grounded to one of the pipes!!!!!!!

The kid is not responsible for the idiocy of adults in positions of authority just because it can be proven that other adults are also idiots.
I'm sure there are lots of things in our homes that could be mistaken for explosives. Don't bring them to school. Or, if you must bring it to school, do it properly. Tell teachers in advance; possibly get a note from a school official. My son brought in a rather powerful electrostatic generator for a science fair project. The school's reaction? Nothing out of the ordinary. Why? They knew that it was the day of the science fair, and they knew my son was planning to bring in a powerful electrostatic generator.

If he had brought it in on some random day, I do not know whether it would have been confused for an explosive, but it's a safe bet that school officials would not have been pleased with him.
 
Likes: 2 people
Dec 2014
17,091
6,139
The Milky Way
#10
It's a clock! It's a fucking clock!

The only question is this: If the kid had been a WASP, like my kid, would anyone have freaked out? Or if one person did, would anyone take that teacher seriously?

Answer: doubt it. Why? Because kids bring stuff like this to school with them all the time and people don't freak out.

Someone obviously failed to read the OP. How embarrassing for you, and playing the race card too. Here, let me help you out:

Josh Welch, a white Maryland kid with ADHD who was 7 years old when he was kicked out of school for chewing a Pop-Tart into the shape of a pistol and pretending to shoot other students with it, must be puzzled.

Where’s his White House invitation? Where’s his chance to start networking at Facebook? His parents were forced to hire a lawyer and spent a year and a half just trying to get the suspension erased from the kid’s record. They were repeatedly refused.

“I stand with Ahmed, too. But I also stand with Alex Stone,” noted Reason writer Robby Soave. Alex Stone, 16-year-old white kid from Summerville, SC wrote a short story in which he imagined using a gun to kill a dinosaur. For this his locker was searched and he was arrested, handcuffed, charged with “disorderly conduct” and suspended from school for three days.
 
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Likes: 2 people

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