Amazon rolls out robots that pack orders and replace jobs

Oct 2014
32,779
5,969
C-A-N-A-D-A-Eh
#61
You're opening statement taps into what I was trying to articulate. I think we're on the same page.

I think kids today have more of a baseline education in tech even w/out advanced degrees so they'll be okay. But yeah, at this rate of automation it won't just be 50y/o coal miners who will be screwed by this economy sooner than later.

Trump's on it tho. America will be Great any day now. We're almost tired of winning.
I dunno how that'll help you in Canada, but maybe once Don is done here he can sidle up there and work his magic.
Do you dig Trade Wars?
Actually, I'm more pissed off about how Trudeau handled the trade wars... When his predecessor faced the same, he was sending diplomats to the White House weekly to push for Canadian exemptions.

But your comment ties to what I was saying about why university rates are on the decline. One thing that will be the longest to replace are trades, even if they get to where they can 3D print entire houses with amenities installed, would still require trades people at some point.
 
Sep 2011
24,999
17,444
aMEEErica
#62
I mostly agree with you, but you are missing the point I'm trying to make.

More like, take a company like Ford. If they reduce their employment costs 90% through automation, to where the costs of the vehicle drops down to little more than the material, energy and maintenance of the equipment, if the costs don't reflect that, with only 10% of the people who will maintain that from the disposable income, that can create issues.

You're right that new jobs will be created too, but the person whose capacity of productive work is flipping burgers, they won't have the mental capacity to produce in a high tech mainly automated economy.
And you are missing the point Henry Ford realized: "Who is going to buy these cars, the idle rich?"

At first the automobile was just a plaything, an "oddity" for the rich...

But, when Henry Ford made his car "affordable" (and also "practical") to the masses it transformed this country more than anything since has.

And again, I disagree, the "burger flippers" of today are the coders of tomorrow, don't underestimate those who are serving a menial, temporary job.

It takes both producers and consumers to make an economy run, a very delicate balance, disturb one side or the other and the whole thing falls apart by next Tuesday...

Thx :)
 
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May 2019
1,507
1,748
A Van Down by the River...
#63
Actually, I'm more pissed off about how Trudeau handled the trade wars... When his predecessor faced the same, he was sending diplomats to the White House weekly to push for Canadian exemptions.

But your comment ties to what I was saying about why university rates are on the decline. One thing that will be the longest to replace are trades, even if they get to where they can 3D print entire houses with amenities installed, would still require trades people at some point.
Hey, y'all are a National Security risk, plus you dun burnt down our ding-dang House! Trump Talks Tough w/ Trudeau

I have a PollyAnnish view on most things, so I tend to think folk are resilient and creative, esp if they see what's ahead. Like you, I worry about those who didn't get an iPhone at birth tho. (At least I think we're strummin' the same guitar here...)
 
Likes: Thx1138
Oct 2014
32,779
5,969
C-A-N-A-D-A-Eh
#64
And you are missing the point Henry Ford realized: "Who is going to buy these cars, the idle rich?"

At first the automobile was just a plaything, an "oddity" for the rich...

But, when Henry Ford made his car "affordable" (and also "practical") to the masses it transformed this country more than anything since has.

And again, I disagree, the "burger flippers" of today are the coders of tomorrow, don't underestimate those who are serving a menial, temporary job.

It takes both producers and consumers to make an economy run, a very delicate balance, disturb one side or the other and the whole thing falls apart by next Tuesday...

Thx :)
It does, but now because of inflation and manipulation, these companies will be able to sustain themselves through speculation. The dollar value of the middle class and lower is a rounding error to the wealthy. There's the risk of a breakaway civilization.

And while yes, most people who go in to menial jobs do that for the experience to get something better, there are a segment of people who lack he intelligence to perform tasks much more complex than that. That is a problem that can't be fixed with education, IQ is primarily genetic.
 
Oct 2014
32,779
5,969
C-A-N-A-D-A-Eh
#65
Hey, y'all are a National Security risk, plus you dun burnt down our ding-dang House! Trump Talks Tough w/ Trudeau

I have a PollyAnnish view on most things, so I tend to think folk are resilient and creative, esp if they see what's ahead. Like you, I worry about those who didn't get an iPhone at birth tho. (At least I think we're strummin' the same guitar here...)
I like to joke about that story when the cockiness gets a bit much.

The interesting thing, while there's the trade war, there are still a great number of companies who buy materials from the US (or whoever has the best) builds stuff and sells it at a healthy markup. As the economy favours that kind of business, the overall economic improvement grows in our favour more than the cost of tariffs... But it's still the frustration that the other guy, who I also disliked for other reasons was willing to put up a fight.

I'm not worried, when phase 2 of Trumps agenda is complete, there will be a great benefit to Canada as well, and worst case, Trudeau is rife with scandal going into an election.

Long term things are trending for the better, it's the transition period that can be shaky.
 
Likes: DairyHeiress
Dec 2014
16,745
6,009
The Milky Way
#66
As I have been saying for years, the robotics revolution means we need to zero out immigration A never-ending flood of legal and illegals from the turd-world is not needed. Except to vote for the Dims that is.
 
Feb 2011
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The formerly great golden state
#67
I read an article about this a while back. It did say there was rampant thievery by customers at self-checkouts and with surprisingly low guilt (maybe b/c they're doing unpaid labor!).

However in this case at Walmart there's a monitor at the exit to audit your receipt-- like they do at Costco.

They do. I went to WalMart, did a self check out, put my purchases in a black cloth bag since they don't provide free bags any more. The monitor looked at the outside of my bag and drew a line through my receipt. That was it. I could have had a diamond necklace... well, it was Wal Mart, maybe a cz necklace, in there and she would not have known. At Costco, everything is in plain view.
 
Likes: DairyHeiress
May 2019
1,507
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A Van Down by the River...
#68
They do. I went to WalMart, did a self check out, put my purchases in a black cloth bag since they don't provide free bags any more. The monitor looked at the outside of my bag and drew a line through my receipt. That was it. I could have had a diamond necklace... well, it was Wal Mart, maybe a cz necklace, in there and she would not have known. At Costco, everything is in plain view.
Yeah, I kept my items in the cart. I bag at the car, so maybe it is not highly scrutinized.

Now I wish I had saved that article. In it they listed the sneaky ways customers had to beat the scanner.
I wouldn't go for the fine jewels at Walmart, but a couple cans of Hearts of Palm or spendy chocolates would be a decent take for me.
I have a guilty conscience tho, so I would probably give myself up.