Another Ukrainian athlete defects to Russia

The Man

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Eleonora Romanova, a (ethnic Russian, clearly, from the name) Ukrainian gymnast went to visit her parents in the East, then pops up with them, in Moscow, reportedly applying for Russian citizenship:




ELEONORA ROMANOVA COULD COMPETE FOR RUSSIA
FEBRUARY 21, 2016

Ukrainian gymnast, Eleonora Romanova could change her citizenship and compete under Russian flag, as Regnum.ru confirms. Elya didn’t compete with team Ukraine in the beggining of the season. We couldn’t see her at L.A. Lights, Miss Valentine or Ukrainian Championships. Some other rumours say that Romanova is injured. According to this website, Eleonora could soon compete representing Russia.

This weekend the first stage of Ukranian Championships were held in Uzhgorod. Anna Rizatdinova won gold medal while Viktoriya Mazur was second and, Anastasiya Mulmina third.

Ukrainian RG Federation spoke about this situation: “To sum up : Eleonora Romanova was staying with her parents in Krasnodon (region of Lugansk) after New Year and the coaches of the National team have been shocked to find out of her presence in Russia. Currently, neither the gymnast nor her parents have reached out to Ukrainian RG Federation and never informed the Federation of the wish to change citizenship. However, we are aware that she was seen in Moscow. Eleonora Romanova has been financed in full by the government of Ukraine and sponsorship during all the years of her stay in National team. Normally the preparation of an athlete of such a high level costs approximately 2-5 mln. USD.”

Ukrainian RG also said in their website: “Ukrainian Gymnastics Federation of Ukraine respects the rights of any person , including the athlete’s right to freedom of expression in accordance with the sports law . However, if you make this decision contributed to certain circumstances , which do not comply with the principles of the Olympic Code , then, of course , Ukrainian Gymnastics Federation for its part will undertake certain legal actions in full compliance with the principles of international sports law.”
Eleonora Romanova could compete for Russia | Rhythmic Gymnastics Info

lmao Ukrainian media are going crazy about this, some are even saying that Russian special agencies conspired with the 17 year old Romanova's parents to essentially abduct her across the border: ???????? ? ?????????? ?? ???????? ?????????? ????????? - ?????????????? ?????? Znaj.ua :D

Bloody idiots... Why not just accept that, after months, if not years of Russophobic propaganda (it started pretty much in 1991, after USSR fell apart), ethnic Russian athletes, and thos ewho feel linguistically and culturally and historically closer to Russia and Russians, don't want to compete for your shithole banana republic? No need for the KGB to get involved, they leave by themselves.

Ukraine lost many great athletes with Crimea, and others - from Donbass, including, now, Romanova.

Ukraine lost other celebrities too, for example the singers Ani Lorak and Taisiya Povaliy

who, while retain their Ukrainian citizenships for now, are spending most of their time in Russia.

Lorak performing in Moscow at Russian version of the Grammies, late last year
[video=youtube;XSzO8f1G_2Q]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSzO8f1G_2Q[/video]

Ukrainians see those women as traitors now, Russians love them more than ever; meanwhile I, personally, think they just made a business choice: Russian-language music market is waaaaaaaay bigger than Ukrainian-language one lol :smiley-shrug:

Politics and sports and show biz do mix over there.
 

Rorschach

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I heard that the entire Ukranian Cross Country team ran to Russia......

Seriously, though...IS Ukraine currently considered a "country," or, is it more like Syria, these days?
 
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The Man

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I heard that the entire Ukranian Cross Country team ran to Russia......

Seriously, though...IS Ukraine currently considered a "country," or, is it more like Syria, these days?
And half the fencing team, including the captain; and some of the best stars of the women's biathlon team... among many others. And I recently read an interview with one Ukrainian athlete now in Moscow who says, after the Rio Olympics, there will be an even greater exodus, hundreds of people are ready to leave, in all sorts of disciplines...

Syria? No, it's not THAT bad there, yet, at least.

More like Mexico, with various nationalist gangs instead of drug cartels, and also the separatist militias in the South East...
 

Rorschach

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And half the fencing team, including the captain; and some of the best stars of the women's biathlon team... among many others. And I recently read an interview with one Ukrainian athlete now in Moscow who says, after the Rio Olympics, there will be an even greater exodus, hundreds of people are ready to leave, in all sorts of disciplines...

Syria? No, it's not THAT bad there, yet, at least.

More like Mexico, with various nationalist gangs instead of drug cartels, and also the separatist militias in the South East...
Well, if they started dealing drugs, things might go better for them!

What drugs can be grown in the Ukraine?

Do they grow FOOD anymore? At one time, that nation was one of the breadbaskets for both Europe and Russia.....
 
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if I were a Samoan, who strives at football, and gets a chance to "defect" to the US.. I would do so too.. and the US would take me in with open arms (no illegal immigration discussion here).

So what's the newsworthy part of this ?
 

Rorschach

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if I were a Samoan, who strives at football, and gets a chance to "defect" to the US.. I would do so too.. and the US would take me in with open arms (no illegal immigration discussion here).

So what's the newsworthy part of this ?
I think the Newsworthy part, is that Ukrainians are leaving in droves. It especially seems that way with those who can more clearly identify as "ethnic Russians," but, others, as well.
 
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The Man

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Well, if they started dealing drugs, things might go better for them!

What drugs can be grown in the Ukraine?

Do they grow FOOD anymore? At one time, that nation was one of the breadbaskets for both Europe and Russia.....
It is sad... Really stark example of what outside meddling can do to a country...

if I were a Samoan, who strives at football, and gets a chance to "defect" to the US.. I would do so too.. and the US would take me in with open arms (no illegal immigration discussion here).

So what's the newsworthy part of this ?
The newsworthy part, to me, is the clear demonstration of just how complicated the situation is there.

Our media have this narrative about the events over there, this awful "aggressor", "invader", "occupier" Russia and the "victim" Ukraine. And yet, look at all the Ukrainians who run to the same "aggressor" and "occupier" for safety or economic reasons, about 800,000 refugees from Donbass; as well as all these famous people.

I have also personally seen, on a Facebook group for Russian immigrants in Canada many folks with Ukrainian names, originally from places in Ukraine, who express:

a. support and solidarity to the people in Donbass, the separatists;
b. friendship and brotherhood to the Russians and some even apologies for the actions of the Poroshenko regime in Kiev, asking that this not be seen as a reflection on their whole nation;
c. contempt and outright hatred for said regime.

In that group alone, I saw hundreds of such people.

And yet, our press continue to stubbornly try to portray this conflict in Donbass as a war between Russians and Ukrainians... Our journalists have no understanding of that part of the world, its historic and cultural complexities, in my opinion. Same like they "report" on the Middle East, or Asia, or Latin America, without really understanding what actually goes on in those places. Typical Western Eurocentric journalism...
 

The Man

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This is interesting, about Ukraine:

Why Russia Stopped at Crimea

FEB 22, 2016 12:20 PM EST

By Leonid Bershidsky


President Vladimir Putin has boasted that Russia took over Crimea "without a single shot being fired." There's even a propaganda movie that presents the operation as the result of brilliant Kremlin planning and seamless execution. A document published on Monday shed new light on why the annexation was bloodless -- and on the limits of Putin's aggressiveness.

The news site Pravda.com.ua has published the transcript of a meeting of Ukraine's National Security and Defense Council that took place Feb. 28, 2014. The previous day, Russian troops without identifying insignia helped pro-Moscow activists take over Crimea's parliament and government. The following day, the Russian parliament authorized Putin to start military operations in Ukraine.

The meeting's attendees, officials swept into power by Ukraine's "Revolution of Dignity," vainly sought to prevent the loss of Crimea to Russia, but effectively decided to give up the peninsula, believing the alternative would be worse.

Oleksandr Turchynov, the acting president and parliament speaker, raised the possibility of fighting back. Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk -- who still is in office, unlike many others who came to power directly after the February 2014 revolution -- opposed a counteroffensive.

"We're talking about declaring war on Russia," he said, according to the transcript. "Right after we do this, there will be a Russian statement 'On defending Russian citizens and Russian speakers who have ethnic ties with Russia.' That is the script the Russians have written, and we're playing to that script."

Yatsenyuk pointed out that the Finance Ministry's bank account was empty and that, according to the Defense Ministry, Ukraine had no military resources to defend Kiev if Russia invaded. Besides, Yatsenyuk said that there would be "an acute ethnic conflict" in Crimea and that the Ukrainian government would be blamed for failing to prevent it. He called for political negotiations through foreign intermediaries to grant Crimea more autonomy and in the meantime to try to rebuild the military.

Other attendees who spoke up against fighting back were acting National Bank Chairman Stepan Kubiv and former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, who had been freed from prison in the final days of the revolution. Tymoshenko argued that Putin wanted to play out the same scenario that unfolded during the 2008 Russian-Georgian war: Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili attacked pro-Russian forces that held the rebellious region of South Ossetia, but Russia intervened and steamrolled the Georgian army. She said of Putin:

He is just waiting for us to give him an opening. Remember how Saakashvili swallowed his bait and lost! We have no right to repeat his mistake. So I'm calling on you to think seven times before we take a single step. I have to tell you, if we had one chance in 100 to win, I would be the first to support an active response.
Turchynov then got a call from the Russian parliament speaker, Sergei Naryshkin. After talking to him, he reported back:

Naryshkin passed on Putin's threats. He said they were ready to make tough decisions on Ukraine for persecuting Russians and Russian-speaking people. Perhaps they mean to send troops not just to Crimea. He passed on Putin's words that if a single Russian dies, they will declare us war criminals and pursue us throughout the world.
Then, intelligence service chief Valentin Nalivaichenko reported that Russian troops were massing at Ukraine's borders. He said:

The Americans and the Germans are all asking us not to do anything active because Putin would use this to start a large-scale invasion.
The council took a vote: Only Turchynov was in favor of declaring a state of war. And that was that: Russia held a spurious referendum in Crimea and took it over. The Ukrainian government gave up without a fight because it was scared of losing the entire country.

It is inconceivable that Putin didn't know how weak Ukraine was. He had access to intelligence from the neighboring country. He could even talk directly to the deposed president, Viktor Yanukovych, who had just fled to Russia. Nothing prevented a Russian invasion. Moreover, Putin didn't need an additional pretext to step in: Russia had already declared the overthrow of Yanukovych an "anti-constitutional coup" -- which, technically, it was, though the ex-president's oppressive regime had little regard for the constitution. It could have gotten Yanukovych to sign the kind of request for assistance that serves as a basis for Russia's current military action in Syria.

Yet Putin didn't do any of that. He didn't want to invade the rest of Ukraine and deal with the momentous international consequences. He only wanted Crimea, the Russian navy base populated mainly by pro-Moscow Russian speakers. Yatsenyuk had no illusions about Crimeans when he talked about the possibility of an "ethnic conflict."

Later, when Russia backed a separatist uprising in eastern Ukraine -- providing military advisers, weapons and, eventually, troops -- Putin was just as careful to avoid a full-scale invasion, even though he could have crushed the Ukrainian military. In fact, even though Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko has boasted that his military is now "the strongest in Europe," Russia still has an overwhelming advantage in numbers, equipment and training.

Throughout the conflict, Putin has never been constrained by any threat of Ukrainian pushback. He doesn't want overt control of this or any neighboring country, just political and economic influence. In Ukraine, he wants to cripple the country enough that the West will be wary of taking it in, integrating it into European institutions. So far, that plan is working: Ukraine remains destitute and riven by internal strife.

Saakashvili, now governor of Odessa in Ukraine, has clearly learned his lesson: He is building a political force with a declared goal of cleansing Ukraine of corruption. That kind of resistance is potentially much more effective against Putin than fighting back militarily. Western politicians should note this and, instead of building up military defenses in eastern Europe, concentrate on helping Russia's neighbors build effective economies and governments.
Why Russia Stopped at Crimea - Bloomberg View