ANOTHER university stops students from handing out Constitution

May 2012
68,891
13,765
By the wall
#1
I can't wait to see our liberal friends justify this one away.



Two students are suing the University of Hawaii for violating their First Amendment rights after administrator prevented them from distributing copies of the U.S. Constitution — demonstrating a frightening lack of knowledge about the very legal document they were attempting to censor.

Students Merritt Burch and Anthony Vizzone, members of the Young Americans for Liberty chapter at UH-Hilo, were prevented from handing out copies of the Constitution at a recruitment event in January. A week later, they were again informed by a censorship-minded administrator that their First Amendment-protected activities were in violation of school policy.

The students were told that they could only distribute literature from within UH-Hilo’s “free speech zone,” a small, muddy, frequently-flooded area on the edge of campus.

Administrators further clarified their level of respect for students’ free speech rights, making comments like, “This isn’t really the ’60s anymore,” and “people can’t really protest like that anymore,” according to the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education.

The First Amendment has not been modified since the 1960s, however, and robustly protects the rights of students at public universities to hold non-disruptive protests, speak their mind and distribute literature.

Administrators also maintained that university policy took precedent over Constitutional rights, according to the complaint.

ANOTHER university stops students from handing out Constitution | The Daily Caller
 
Likes: 2 people
May 2012
68,891
13,765
By the wall
#3
Find an unbiased source for this story.
Type in University of Hawaii constitution lawsuit and you will get a plethora of them.

I verified the story before I posted it so if you don't like this source there are any number of different ones you can pick to read the same facts.
 
Jun 2013
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Here
#4
Their reason for handing out the Constitution? Is it otherwise inaccessible to university students or are they trying to push a political agenda of some sorts? Is limiting where they are able to distribute the copies of the Constitution, denying them 1st Amendment rights? I remember a huge variety of "handouts" on all subject matters being available for those that chose to pick up a copy. The choice was up to the student to accept what was being offered by other students. Not sure of all the details here and whether the handing out of material, be it the Constitution or the communist manifesto, might involve more than simply making it available for students to accept. If there is a "hard sell" to "take one" with a political message involved, it would seem reasonable for universities to limit such activities to specific areas or consider that the way some "hand out" things is more like harassment to accept than choice to accept.

I imagine if there were students handing out copies of the Qur'an or the communist manifesto, the first people to complain about it would be those whining about those supporting the handing out of the Constitution..
 
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Likes: 1 person
May 2012
68,891
13,765
By the wall
#5
Their reason for handing out the Constitution? Is it otherwise inaccessible to university students or are they trying to push a political agenda of some sorts? Is limiting where they are able to distribute the copies of the Constitution, denying them 1st Amendment rights? I remember a huge variety of "handouts" on all subject matters being available for those that chose to pick up a copy. The choice was up to the student to accept what was being offered by other students. Not sure of all the details here and whether the handing out of material, be it the Constitution or the communist manifesto, might involve more than simply making it available for students to accept. If there is a "hard sell" to "take one" with a political message involved, it would seem reasonable for universities to limit such activities to specific areas or consider that the way some "hand out" things is more like harassment to accept than choice to accept.

I imagine if there were students handing out copies of the Qur'an or the communist manifesto, the first people to complain about it would be those whining about those supporting the handing out of the Constitution..
Its a first amendment issue and why its going to court.

Here is a more definitive explanation of the actual case.


(Reuters) -
Two students are suing a Hawaii university after they say they were told in January they could not pass out copies of the Constitution to fellow students, in a lawsuit accusing the school of violating their First Amendment rights to free speech.

In a complaint against the University of Hawaii at Hilo, the students' lawyers said the school "unconstitutionally restricts access to open areas on campus by requiring students to seek permission to speak at least seven business days in advance."

The complaint, filed on Thursday, added that the areas where students could engage in "spontaneous expressive activities" was limited to a small fraction of the school's 115-acre campus.

"Part of the paradox is the idea that on a state campus, the exercise of constitutional rights can be confined to a zone, to one-quarter of 1 percent of the campus," said Attorney Bob Corn-Revere, who represents students Merritt Burch and Anthony Vizzone.

The First Amendment of the Constitution protects the rights of freedom of speech and freedom of assembly.

The school said in a statement it had initiated a review of its policies and the manner in which they are enforced in the wake of the controversy, adding that it was committed to free expression and the open exchange of ideas.

"This case involves the application of specific policies ... that were implemented to protect those values while preserving the educational environment for all students," the university said. "The policies were developed in a manner completely independent of any specific viewpoint, perspective or content."

The school gave no further details on the policies.
Students sue Hawaii university over freedom of speech | Reuters
 
May 2012
68,891
13,765
By the wall
#7
University of Hawaii Sued For Stopping Students From Handing Out Constitution - YouTube story of Hawaii & constitution

Weird reference to 60's protestors while referring to constitution. Maybe to university intellectuals, the constitution is some fringe wack job concept.
Well most of my poly sci professors say that they don't believe its anything more than an historical document that has been trumped by actual laws upheld by the courts. They point to the fact that the different Supreme Courts often rule in completely opposite ways on the same issue depending on societal values so the Constitution is basically worthless today.

I did have one professor though that said he gave up a six figure income (he owned a car dealership) to come teach us about the document hanging on the wall, the Constitution, and that he believed so strongly in it that he felt is was worth it.

He was quite passionate.

He was the only exception though.
 
Jan 2007
37,848
8,709
#8
A couple more generations and people will be clueless about the constitution. Maybe it's well on it's way already.
Growth and learning happen after school is finished. Civic class when I was in school was a faint attempt.
 
Jun 2013
18,382
16,171
Here
#9
Its a first amendment issue and why its going to court.

Here is a more definitive explanation of the actual case.


(Reuters) -

Students sue Hawaii university over freedom of speech | Reuters
As with religion, does limitation as to where "free speech" takes place physically, as long as it is not totally banned, mean the right is taken away? Is there something mysterious and rare about access to the Constitution? Is it a widely available piece of "speech" or rare and suppressed and otherwise unavailable and inaccessible?

Does the University of Hawaii have no rights to "free speech" as well, with regard to any objections it may have to where it takes place and whether it, or distribution of any other material could be disruptive? In other words, can reasonable limitations be placed on "rights" without taking the right away? Would the U of H be able to make such a defense? Does someone have the "right" under the first Amendment, to knock on your door at 3AM to exercise their right of "free speech"?
 
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Likes: 1 person
Sep 2013
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5,887
Oklahoma
#10
Type in University of Hawaii constitution lawsuit and you will get a plethora of them.

I verified the story before I posted it so if you don't like this source there are any number of different ones you can pick to read the same facts.
“It’s not about your rights in this case, it’s about the University policy that you can’t approach people,”

So now show me where they DIDN'T stop a similar case but different ideology that you would be able to extrapolate bias, otherwise shut up.
 

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