Anyone Have Any Luck With A Chiropractor?

Jan 2019
772
266
Tempe, AZ
#1
Personally, I consider them "quacks" like acupuncturists and "Wholeistic" medicine doctors (yes, I spelled it correctly, as supposedly they practice "whole body" medicine, NOT "hole body" medicine! :D
 
Jan 2019
772
266
Tempe, AZ
#6
Some of the CLAIMS of Chiropractic are indeed Quackery. But some can actually relieve lower back pain.
I hope so. It took me over A MONTH to get an appt. with an orthopedic doctor/surgeon. I called a chiropractor, and they wanted me to come in same day! (today). I said I can't come in today (had started drinking at noon as happy hour begins then when one is retired!), so I have appt. tomorrow morning. :D
 

Djinn

Council Hall
Dec 2007
51,597
38,366
Pennsylvania, USA
#7
I'm leery of chiropractors. Not due to any personal experience, but by how they're managed. If a GP physician recommends that patients perform arm exercises to help treat asthma or cancer, it's a safe bet that the American Medical Association will yank his license promptly. However, if a chiropractor claims that he can treat chronic skin rashes through "spinal alignment," it's not likely to be questioned. Yes, I know that not all chiropractors make dubious claims. But I find it disconcerting that the American Chiropractic Association doesn't crack down on those who do. This puts the validity of the entire field into question.

And if that's not enough, the whole field of study is based on "vertebral subluxations," which (like "auras" and "souls") are undetectable via empirical means, and have no basis in medical science.
 
Jan 2019
772
266
Tempe, AZ
#8
I'm leery of chiropractors. Not due to any personal experience, but by how they're managed. If a GP physician recommends that patients perform arm exercises to help treat asthma or cancer, it's a safe bet that the American Medical Association will yank his license promptly. However, if a chiropractor claims that he can treat chronic skin rashes through "spinal alignment," it's not likely to be questioned. Yes, I know that not all chiropractors make dubious claims. But I find it disconcerting that the American Chiropractic Association doesn't crack down on those who do. This puts the validity of the entire field into question.

And if that's not enough, the whole field of study is based on "vertebral subluxations," which (like "auras" and "souls") are undetectable via empirical means, and have no basis in medical science.
I will definitely report if appt. helps, or is a total waste of time!
 
Nov 2015
7,110
2,360
UK
#10
An osteopath is concerned with muscles, joints etc.. and I was advised to avoid them.

A good chiropractor won't touch the vertebrae where there's a disc problem. The chiropractor will make sure the others are aligned correctly to generally help the back. After he/she clicks them into place, you feel grand. Next day sore/stiff. The day after that, spot on.

A disc doesn't slip out and you can't push a disc back in. A disc is like a jam donut, fibres on the outside, soft gel in the middle. As the fibres become damaged, it allows the gel to bulge the fibrous wall out, resulting it in touching/kinking a nerve. You will experience pain in various parts of your leg(s) depending on which nerve is kinked.

How do I know? Experience.

If you can, like me, avoid surgery. Just be careful and soldier on. Everyone I know who's had surgery are back in several years later. The only trouble is, if your back injury means your bladder empties against your will, you will be in for an op. The disc comes out and the bones fused together.

There are good and bad chiropractors, go by word of mouth.