As Patients Struggle With Bills, Hospital Sues Thousands for unpaid bills

Mar 2012
58,084
39,656
New Hampshire
#51
What does this country need more of....doctors or insurance execs?
Thats just it, going after doctors, nurses and researchers salaries is not smart. We have a dire shortage of them. Few want to spend 8-12 years in school and then do rotating shifts up all night to become one. They literally see humans at their most desperate and sick. We shouldnt hold monies from them. But insurers who sit at a desk and may not have even went to grad school? Yes.
 

Djinn

Council Hall
Dec 2007
51,681
38,491
Pennsylvania, USA
#53
The problem is that today's doctors have tons of student loans that cannot be paid back on the salary they would get here.
If you google “which professions carry the most student loan debt,” you’ll see that doctors (and lawyers) don’t particularly stand out compared to other professions.
 

HCProf

Council Hall
Sep 2014
28,917
18,377
USA
#54
The problem is that today's doctors have tons of student loans that cannot be paid back on the salary they would get here.
Plus we have a current shortage of primary care physicians and specialists. Another problem, our medical school entrance requirements are very strict and not many are able to get into medical school. The US is weak as far as STEM candidates.
 
Mar 2012
58,084
39,656
New Hampshire
#57
Plus we have a current shortage of primary care physicians and specialists. Another problem, our medical school entrance requirements are very strict and not many are able to get into medical school. The US is weak as far as STEM candidates.
We are closing hospitals left and right as well. People are getting nervous. Nobody wants to have an hour or two ambulance ride to get to the ER when they are having a heart attack.
 
Mar 2012
58,084
39,656
New Hampshire
#58
I don't know about that. I don't know too many people in my career who have over 100K in student loan debt.
I think the numbers get a bit skewed here as some doctors kids also become doctors and have no debt. My dentists' daughter just graduated from dental school and she is in the practice now. Dentist said she paid her dental school tuition and is helping her get started. She said a lot of new graduating dentists cant afford it and have to start out as those dentists in the shopping malls which have to give close to 50% to the franchise owner. She admitted even she couldnt be a dentist today if she had to start over.
 

Devil505

Former Staff
Jan 2008
72,151
30,217
Florida
#59
I'm sure the lawyers for both sides would meet and negotiate a settlement b4 the case went to trial...but absent that.....and assuming the debtor is not just a known deadbeat.......I'd be inclined to side with the debtor.
Hospital prices are absurd!
If the 2 sides couldn't reach a settlement, the judge would undoubtedly order them to try again......right then and there in a conference room.
Judges always prefer a settlement. (god help the more stubborn lawyer in my court!)
 

HCProf

Council Hall
Sep 2014
28,917
18,377
USA
#60
Thats just it, going after doctors, nurses and researchers salaries is not smart. We have a dire shortage of them. Few want to spend 8-12 years in school and then do rotating shifts up all night to become one. They literally see humans at their most desperate and sick. We shouldnt hold monies from them. But insurers who sit at a desk and may not have even went to grad school? Yes.
Nurses are the first out the door when hospitals cut back on their budgets. The nursing shortage is when I entered nursing. It was awful. 20:1 patient/nurse ratios. The hospitals had an idea that they could train nursing assistants to do a big part of the job....and they trained them. The problem was regulation by State for procedures they could perform. For example, IV's. We trained the lab to start a line for nurses to push a med. All that happened, two people did one job and the State Board fought against it. It did not work out and when the hospitals started hiring nurses again, the nurses had moved on to other areas, such as pharmaceutical sales and education and the hospitals had to start from scratch again.

When I worked as a Director of Nursing for a Jewish hospital...I was hired after they laid off 700 nurses system wide. That hospital almost worked me to death. I clocked more hours on salary than the hourly nurses covering shifts. We had just started 12 hour shifts and I pulled several 24 hour shifts back to back when I could not cover the shift safely. It was either work a double shift or close the unit due to staffing. I was averaging about 4.00 a hour. I would not cut salaries on people who have direct patient care responsibilities....it is the patient who suffers for that decision.