As Patients Struggle With Bills, Hospital Sues Thousands for unpaid bills

Mar 2012
57,873
39,432
New Hampshire
#61
Nurses are the first out the door when hospitals cut back on their budgets. The nursing shortage is when I entered nursing. It was awful. 20:1 patient/nurse ratios. The hospitals had an idea that they could train nursing assistants to do a big part of the job....and they trained them. The problem was regulation by State for procedures they could perform. For example, IV's. We trained the lab to start a line for nurses to push a med. All that happened, two people did one job and the State Board fought against it. It did not work out and when the hospitals started hiring nurses again, the nurses had moved on to other areas, such as pharmaceutical sales and education and the hospitals had to start from scratch again.

When I worked as a Director of Nursing for a Jewish hospital...I was hired after they laid off 700 nurses system wide. That hospital almost worked me to death. I clocked more hours on salary than the hourly nurses covering shifts. We had just started 12 hour shifts and I pulled several 24 hour shifts back to back when I could not cover the shift safely. It was either work a double shift or close the unit due to staffing. I was averaging about 4.00 a hour. I would not cut salaries on people who have direct patient care responsibilities....it is the patient who suffers for that decision.
Yea I dont like those that attack caregivers. One of our friends from college is now a surgical nurse and makes a lot of money. But she says a lot her old friends thinks she is greedy because she is in healthcare and makes that kind of money while people cant afford healthcare. She tries to explain its a rough job and not her fault, but she does say especially nowadays its a thankless job as people scoff at anyone making a good living in healthcare. Stupid.
 
Likes: Ian Jeffrey
Jan 2008
71,993
30,003
Florida
#62
Nurses are the first out the door when hospitals cut back on their budgets. The nursing shortage is when I entered nursing. It was awful. 20:1 patient/nurse ratios. The hospitals had an idea that they could train nursing assistants to do a big part of the job....and they trained them. The problem was regulation by State for procedures they could perform. For example, IV's. We trained the lab to start a line for nurses to push a med. All that happened, two people did one job and the State Board fought against it. It did not work out and when the hospitals started hiring nurses again, the nurses had moved on to other areas, such as pharmaceutical sales and education and the hospitals had to start from scratch again.

When I worked as a Director of Nursing for a Jewish hospital...I was hired after they laid off 700 nurses system wide. That hospital almost worked me to death. I clocked more hours on salary than the hourly nurses covering shifts. We had just started 12 hour shifts and I pulled several 24 hour shifts back to back when I could not cover the shift safely. It was either work a double shift or close the unit due to staffing. I was averaging about 4.00 a hour. I would not cut salaries on people who have direct patient care responsibilities....it is the patient who suffers for that decision.
I'll bet you were discouraged from reporting the actual hours you worked. AMIRIGHT? (we never could in the DEA)
We got paid for 50 hrs/wk (Premium Pay) but actually worked much more than that......but could never report it or management would be all over you.
 
Mar 2013
76,576
45,763
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#64
I'll bet you were discouraged from reporting the actual hours you worked. AMIRIGHT? (we never could in the DEA)
We got paid for 50 hrs/wk (Premium Pay) but actually worked much more than that......but could never report it or management would be all over you.
I do not imagine that would go over well in the courts.
 

HCProf

Council Hall
Sep 2014
28,781
18,200
USA
#65
We are closing hospitals left and right as well. People are getting nervous. Nobody wants to have an hour or two ambulance ride to get to the ER when they are having a heart attack.
We have closed a few hospitals around here as well due to reimbursement and uninsured care. A patient will never survive a 1-2 hour ambulance ride while having a heart attack. Around here and in rural areas, those patients are life flighted by helicopter.....only to received a monster of a bill later on.

The only people who are filing bankruptcy and struggling under medical bills are the middle class. The wealthy can just write a check and the poor owes nothing, regardless of the amount. Combine this with uninsured care...such as undocumented immigrants and the cost is just piled on the backs of the middle class to cover the expenses.
 
Likes: bajisima

HCProf

Council Hall
Sep 2014
28,781
18,200
USA
#68
Correct; I'm saying that doctors and lawyers do not stand out as having particularly high student loan debt.
The only people I know who have over 100K in students loans are doctors, lawyers and people who have earned their PhD's. To me, 100K in student loan debt big time stands out. If we want to preserve our physicians, we need to provide loan relief for them. They certainly pay enough in personal income tax over their careers to offset the relief.
 
Likes: HayJenn
Jan 2008
71,993
30,003
Florida
#69
I do not imagine that would go over well in the courts.
The courts never got involved.
It would have meant raising taxes to pay us a fair wage. (no judge wanted to open that can of worms)

Most of us worked 60-70 hours a week and got paid for 50. (LEO's are expected to bust our asses and keep our mouths shut)
Often those extra hours were the most dangerous ones!
 
Last edited: