Atlanta Hwy Bridge Collapses In Flames

Rorschach

Former Staff
Aug 2012
53,875
20,202
america
Surprisingly....FIRE, at high temperatures can melt steel, and degrade concrete.

I want to know what caused the fire, and, why it could not be put out. (I do not know, but, that sounds like a fuel tanker....)

Even NEW bridges will have limits under such stresses, although they will, by definition of being "new," be better engineered, perhaps with stronger, but lighter materials. (And, perhaps some secondary structural safety features...)
 
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Rorschach

Former Staff
Aug 2012
53,875
20,202
america
If it was fatigue, all the connected roads and bridges are about the same age, same materials, probably same engineer.

I am a little stunned they aren't doing inspections all over that area.
Fatigue MAY have played a small role in the bridge failure, but, for the most part, it was FIRE.
 
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Rorschach

Former Staff
Aug 2012
53,875
20,202
america
And neither one is a combustible material. So, was this bridge bombed?
A material does not have to be "combustible" to fail under intense heat.

--Steel begins to loose it's strength, even as it begins to twist and de-form, under intense heat.

--Concrete loses its water content (VERY important, believe it or not), even as it's "aggregate" begins to expand. This can literally turn Concrete back into dust. (INTERESTING, but, unrelated factoid: Do you know that Bridge Concrete, which is some of the strongest, has literally MILLIONS of micro fractures and cracks in it's structure? They are so small, we do not see them, and the aggregate acts as a reinforcement that holds it all together. Concrete is an incredibly interesting material, and there are lots of things about it, that the common person does not realize....)
 
Feb 2010
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between Moon and NYC
A material does not have to be "combustible" to fail under intense heat.

--Steel begins to loose it's strength, even as it begins to twist and de-form, under intense heat.


--Concrete loses its water content (VERY important, believe it or not), even as it's "aggregate" begins to expand. This can literally turn Concrete back into dust. (INTERESTING, but, unrelated factoid: Do you know that Bridge Concrete, which is some of the strongest, has literally MILLIONS of micro fractures and cracks in it's structure? They are so small, we do not see them, and the aggregate acts as a reinforcement that holds it all together. Concrete is an incredibly interesting material, and there are lots of things about it, that the common person does not realize....)

The twin towers were a pretty good example...
 

Rorschach

Former Staff
Aug 2012
53,875
20,202
america
The twin towers were a pretty good example...
Exactly.

They were actually Fireproofed to last ONE hour (OLD Codes, I can assure you!).

The Fireproofing had been damaged over the years, but.....they both lasted for about...one hour.

(The designers did not imagine a modern jet, full of jet fuel intentionally flying into either tower. The Fireproofing actually performed quite well, under such intense heat....)
 
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