Australians aren't happy with their choices for leader but they have to vote anyway

Mar 2012
54,653
36,289
New Hampshire
#1
Australia doesn't really like either its Prime Minister, Scott Morrison, or Opposition Labor leader Bill Shorten. In surveys of who would make a better leader, a full quarter of Australians can't even pick between the two.

But with Australia one of the few countries in the world to have compulsory voting, they have to cast their ballot for someone on Saturday, which experts are saying could lead to a record third-party vote.

More than anything else, amid a merry-go-round of prime ministers and a lack of leadership, Australians are just fed up with both major parties, former Liberal Party leader John Hewson told CNN. "Basically both parties are self-absorbed, scoring points on each other, inside the party or between parties, so basically all the big issues have just been left adrift," he said.

In a survey after the 2016 election, the Australian National University found the country's dissatisfaction with democracy was at an all-time high. Of almost 3,000 voters interviewed, 40% said they were unhappy with Australia's democracy, 56% said the government was run for a few big interests and a record 74% said people in government just "look after themselves."

At the last election in 2016, more Australians cast ballots for a third-party candidate than at any time since the end of World War II. In the country's upper house, the Senate, one in three votes was for neither the Labor party or the Liberal National coalition.

Australia election 2019: Voters aren't really happy with either of their choices for leader, but they have to vote anyway - CNN
 
Likes: The Man
Jul 2015
32,194
23,357
Florida
#4
Australia doesn't really like either its Prime Minister, Scott Morrison, or Opposition Labor leader Bill Shorten. In surveys of who would make a better leader, a full quarter of Australians can't even pick between the two.

But with Australia one of the few countries in the world to have compulsory voting, they have to cast their ballot for someone on Saturday, which experts are saying could lead to a record third-party vote.

More than anything else, amid a merry-go-round of prime ministers and a lack of leadership, Australians are just fed up with both major parties, former Liberal Party leader John Hewson told CNN. "Basically both parties are self-absorbed, scoring points on each other, inside the party or between parties, so basically all the big issues have just been left adrift," he said.

In a survey after the 2016 election, the Australian National University found the country's dissatisfaction with democracy was at an all-time high. Of almost 3,000 voters interviewed, 40% said they were unhappy with Australia's democracy, 56% said the government was run for a few big interests and a record 74% said people in government just "look after themselves."

At the last election in 2016, more Australians cast ballots for a third-party candidate than at any time since the end of World War II. In the country's upper house, the Senate, one in three votes was for neither the Labor party or the Liberal National coalition.

Australia election 2019: Voters aren't really happy with either of their choices for leader, but they have to vote anyway - CNN
They will equally SHARE FAULT or CREDIT in the end, won't they?
 
May 2012
66,392
12,853
By the wall
#6
Maybe or its possible a surprise third party win. Doubtful but they claim the polls show 40% might vote third party.
In their parliamentary system wouldn't that give the third party the majority though?

Remember that they don't have a winner takes all system there if my memory serves me correct.
 
Nov 2016
6,528
5,998
USA
#8
Argentina has mandatory voting as well. During the 60s, when the military junta decided to hold elections, they did not allow the still popular Peronistas to run for office. As a protest, the Peronistas urged voters to “¡Vote en blanco!” (Cast a blank ballot).

Not that it mattered, but a lot of blank ballots were cast.
 
May 2012
66,392
12,853
By the wall
#9
Yea I guess so. But it wouldnt come from the two supposed major parties.
Well the thing with parliamentary systems, and their downfalls, are all the backroom deals that are made.

Even with a majority a third party would still need the support of one of the major parties to pass legislation, it's just the way it works.

So then you have favors being exchanged for votes and the corruption really begins...., "ok you guys vote for this and we will vote for that", type of thing.

It works fine in Europe because there are so many sects living in close quarters with one another but its been a miserable failure in Australia because they don't have the same geopolitical thing going on.

Its also why it would fail here.

Australia is more like America in that the people that live there eventually come to identify as Australian, not some hyphenated term. In Europe people tend to keep their identities from wherever they originated so the politics are all over the place.

In Australia, like America, there are really only two sides to an issue.

Our founders got it right, they got it wrong.

You can just look at their political history to see how bad their system is for them.
 
Aug 2018
1,992
3,160
Vancouver
#10
Well the thing with parliamentary systems, and their downfalls, are all the backroom deals that are made.

Even with a majority a third party would still need the support of one of the major parties to pass legislation, it's just the way it works.

So then you have favors being exchanged for votes and the corruption really begins...., "ok you guys vote for this and we will vote for that", type of thing.

It works fine in Europe because there are so many sects living in close quarters with one another but its been a miserable failure in Australia because they don't have the same geopolitical thing going on.

Its also why it would fail here.

Australia is more like America in that the people that live there eventually come to identify as Australian, not some hyphenated term. In Europe people tend to keep their identities from wherever they originated so the politics are all over the place.

In Australia, like America, there are really only two sides to an issue.

Our founders got it right, they got it wrong.

You can just look at their political history to see how bad their system is for them.
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