Back to Stalingrad?

Dec 2010
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[MENTION=5446]Kropotkin[/MENTION] Not trying to be nosy here but I wouldn't post pictures of myself on this site or most any political forum while identifying yourself as an advocate of communism. There has been a lot of right wing anti communist groups who collect that sort of information for rather nefarious reasons.
Ha I'm not particularly worried about that. Maybe I ended up on some watchlist of the KGB...I mean, FSB.

But Russian security seemed very lax. I inadvertently smuggled illegal narcotics into the Russian Federation, nobody ever even checked through my bags, it's not like the old Soviet days.

I don't think wearing an "CCCP" cap identified me as anything but a real-life troll of the Russian people. I wanted reactions from old Russians walking around seeing some young American walking around Russia wearing a "Soviet Union" baseball cap. It was an artistic endeavor.

In any event, my face is barely recognizable in that pic, and my haircut is quite different from the way it was during my Russian adventure.
 

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
47,908
35,504
Toronto

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
47,908
35,504
Toronto
[MENTION=5446]Kropotkin[/MENTION]

Russian security isn't "lax". That's just your white Western privilege :D White American guy, they look at you, tourist, or exchange student, maybe. Whatever. They don't care about you. Especially since, I'm guessing, you didn't show off that you're gay either, did you, didn't march around with a big old rainbow flag? If you did, it might have been a very different adventure for ya ;) Otherwise though, a white Westerner won't usually have any problems over there.

Try being a "dark" migrant from Caucasus or Central Asia. God help you if ever happen to go out with your passport in your pocket

lol
 
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Dec 2010
7,536
2,062
New York
[MENTION=5446]Kropotkin[/MENTION]

Russian security isn't "lax". That's just your white Western privilege :D White American guy, they look at you, tourist, or exchange student, maybe. Whatever. They don't care about you. Especially since, I'm guessing, you didn't show off that you're gay either, did you, didn't march around with a big old rainbow flag? If you did, it might have been a very different adventure for ya ;) Otherwise though, a white Westerner won't usually have any problems over there.

Try being a "dark" migrant from Caucasus or Central Asia. God help you if ever happen to go out with your passport in your pocket

lol
Well there definitely is white institutionalized privilege over there.

I remember going to visit Ostankino Tower, very tall television/radio tower that also offers a beautiful observation deck that gives amazing sights of Moscow.



However you had to go through security to get there since obviously its a landmark that is quite a target for terrorism. Russian cops staffed a checkpoint before you could enter the tower, or even get near the base of the tower. Security included presenting your passport for inspection. I was with a group of American students, all white of course. I was the only fool to forget my passport back at the dorm at RGGU. I was nervous thinking I wasn't to be allowed in when I approached the security guard at the checkpoint and all I could utter was "Ya zabiyl"....however the cop just shrugged his shoulders and waved me in and told me to go ahead.

Somehow I doubt the cops would have been so lax in letting me in without a passport if I were black or brown-skinned.

But I hardly ever even carried my passport with me out of fear it would get lost or stolen.

So it's good to be white in Russia...I'm not sure I would have felt safe even going to Russia if I weren't white.

Though even white foreigners, especially Americans, I don't think are particularly welcome in Russia. I remember trying to buy a bottle of wine at a supermarket in Russia. Apparently the purchase age is 18, although it is rarely enforced upon Russians. However even though I was 22 at the time she refused to sell it to me. I insisted "Mne dvadsat dva let" but she wouldn't sell to me, and the old babyshka in front of me just told the clerk "innostraniy...". Haha I don't think in an American supermarket, if someone with an accent tried to buy something, that the old lady in front of him would just call him a "foreigner" right in front of him. I'm not sure if the old babyshka was actually defending me and saying just let me buy the damn wine bottle because I'm an "innostraniy" or if she was just mocking a foreigner in Russia.

Actually I did dress in very bright flashy rainbowy colors and tight clothing....but actually that made me fit in with all the metrosexual Moscow men who would have been considered "gay" in most parts of the U.S. considering the way they dressed in tight pink shirts and carried purses! :p

But Russian airport security did seem kinda lax...I mean I don't think they could have told that the piece of luggage I was transporting that happened to contain illegal narcotics under Russian law belonged to a white person. It's not like the old Soviet days where they went through every compartment in your bags to look for subversive elements.
 
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The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
47,908
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Toronto
Well there definitely is white institutionalized privilege over there.

I remember going to visit Ostankino Tower, very tall television/radio tower that also offers a beautiful observation deck that gives amazing sights of Moscow.

However you had to go through security to get there since obviously its a landmark that is quite a target for terrorism. Russian cops staffed a checkpoint before you could enter the tower, or even get near the base of the tower. Security included presenting your passport for inspection. I was with a group of American students, all white of course. I was the only fool to forget my passport back at the dorm at RGGU. I was nervous thinking I wasn't to be allowed in when I approached the security guard at the checkpoint and all I could utter was "Ya zabiyl"....however the cop just shrugged his shoulders and waved me in and told me to go ahead.

Somehow I doubt the cops would have been so lax in letting me in without a passport if I were black or brown-skinned.

But I hardly ever even carried my passport with me out of fear it would get lost or stolen.

So it's good to be white in Russia...I'm not sure I would have felt safe even going to Russia if I weren't white.

Though even white foreigners, especially Americans, I don't think are particularly welcome in Russia. I remember trying to buy a bottle of wine at a supermarket in Russia. Apparently the purchase age is 18, although it is rarely enforced upon Russians. However even though I was 22 at the time she refused to sell it to me. I insisted "Mne dvadsat dva let" but she wouldn't sell to me, and the old babyshka in front of me just told the clerk "innostraniy...". Haha I don't think in an American supermarket, if someone with an accent tried to buy something, that the old lady in front of him would just call him a "foreigner" right in front of him. I'm not sure if the old babyshka was actually defending me and saying just let me buy the damn wine bottle because I'm an "innostraniy" or if she was just mocking a foreigner in Russia.

Actually I did dress in very bright flashy rainbowy colors and tight clothing....but actually that made me fit in with all the metrosexual Moscow men who would have been considered "gay" in most parts of the U.S. considering the way they dressed in tight pink shirts and carried purses!

But Russian airport security did seem kinda lax...I mean I don't think they could have told that the piece of luggage I was transporting that happened to contain illegal narcotics under Russian law belonged to a white person. It's not like the old Soviet days where they went through every compartment in your bags to look for subversive elements.
Security has been increased, after all the terrorist attacks of the years, especially on the metro, which has it's own set of challenges.

They are putting metal detectors on every station entry points


Problem with that is, it gets incredibly crowded down there, especially at peak hours


Imagine this mass of people, getting bottled up at these detectors. Not only does this create mass concentration areas, which are actually ideal for terrorists setting off bombs; it also, naturally, tends to piss people off, who have to stand around and wait in huge lines when they are late for work, etc. This in a place that already has plenty of crime and violence, including people drawing guns on each other on occasions

... No comment.

Then, you have the "zatsepers", the "hangers-on", young idiots who like to travel on the outside of trains, another headache for transport police


They are doing what they can though, to control things, lots of police everywhere, cameras, dogs



Interesting place, Moscow Metro. Amazing, who you can bump into down there, even can run into Stalin sometimes

lol
 
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