Boris Johnson was supposed to speak on police training. He showed up an hour late and ranted about Brexit

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A police officer fainted during the speech because they had been made to stand in the sun the whole time waiting for him.

Now it's become apparent that Johnson completely abused the entire event, the police were assembled for Johnson to speak solely on police-related matters; he proceeded to spend almost the entire time attacking the British opposition and take questions about Brexit. Despite his obvious attempts to emulate the man, Johnson is no Trump and he's not in the U.S.; this is a major violation of governing norms, the British consider it essential to respect the political neutrality of the civil service.

The pressure is building and one is left to conclude that he probably won't be PM for very much longer. He's got no majority, no mandate and no vision. It's just a matter of time.

 
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A loudmouthed New York born asshole with a ridiculous haircut who doesn't know what he's doing and makes everything about himself.

Sound familiar?

Johnson and Trump: two leaders afraid to do the hard work of running a country | Richard Wolffe
Johnson just operates in a different environment than Trump, though. He is merely a head of government. His job is to run things and represent the voters, not the country, to the extent he participates in ceremony he must comply with tradition, he does not lead ceremonies. To politicize a police-related event is totally unheard of and guaranteed to alienate British voters across the spectrum. It has gotten bad enough that not even Johnson's own brother is prepared to stand by him.
 
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Johnson just operates in a different environment than Trump, though. He is merely a head of government. His job is to run things and represent the voters, not the country, to the extent he participates in ceremony he must comply with tradition, he does not lead ceremonies. To politicize a police-related event is totally unheard of and guaranteed to alienate British voters across the spectrum. It has gotten bad enough that not even Johnson's own brother is prepared to stand by him.
I saw that his brother bailed.
A Brit friend tells me that Johnson was a decent mayor, but has gone off the rails with the whole Brexit thing.
 
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Johnson just operates in a different environment than Trump, though. He is merely a head of government. His job is to run things and represent the voters, not the country, to the extent he participates in ceremony he must comply with tradition, he does not lead ceremonies. To politicize a police-related event is totally unheard of and guaranteed to alienate British voters across the spectrum. It has gotten bad enough that not even Johnson's own brother is prepared to stand by him.
I didn't realise this was different than the way it always was in the US. Until a few years ago.

There's not supposed to be a difference. The only difference is the reliability of the voters to care.
 

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I didn't realise this was different than the way it always was in the US. Until a few years ago.

There's not supposed to be a difference. The only difference is the reliability of the voters to care.
That's part of it, but the PM's office by nature is also much less formalized than the presidency. They have an official mansion and various trappings of office, but at the end of the day a parliamentary majority can indirectly fire them at any time and they are effectively the nation's highest-ranking manager rather than its leader.

For a PM to surround himself with police officers to make a political statement is not just abusive, it is completely outside the realm of how things are supposed to work. Most federal cops in the U.S. ultimately owe their allegiance to an official appointed by the president; no cops report to the Prime Minister in any way, they owe their allegiance to the Queen, who temporarily delegates her authority to the Secretary of State for the Home Department. The PM practically has nothing to do with it.
 
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That's part of it, but the PM's office by nature is also much less formalized than the presidency. They have an official mansion and various trappings of office, but at the end of the day a parliamentary majority can indirectly fire them at any time and they are effectively the nation's highest-ranking manager rather than its leader.

For a PM to surround himself with police officers to make a political statement is not just abusive, it is completely outside the realm of how things are supposed to work. Most federal cops in the U.S. ultimately owe their allegiance to an official appointed by the president; no cops report to the Prime Minister in any way, they owe their allegiance to the Queen, who temporarily delegates her authority to the Secretary of State for the Home Department. The PM practically has nothing to do with it.
I know how a PM works. I guess I was ill-informed about how a President works.

I know Americans tend to revere them more than we do in Parliamentary systems. But I assumed it was a slight difference. A cultural one, not so significant a difference.

Live and learn.
 
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I know how a PM works. I guess I was ill-informed about how a President works.
Oh, I apologize. I forgot you're Canadian. Of course you do. Sorry.

I know Americans tend to revere them more than we do in Parliamentary systems. But I assumed it was a slight difference. A cultural one, not so significant a difference.

Live and learn.
We are finding out that basically the president is a temporary dictator. We can consider their actual powers; the powers Congress has chosen to delegate to them over the years; the probably illegal acts Trump is committing but for which there exists no mechanism to check; and the acts Trump is committing, which previously had been thought to be illegal, but now the partisan Supreme Court has signed off on ... We find the executive is probably more powerful than it ever has been.

Should the Democrats prevail in 2020, I earnestly hope that the new president takes concrete steps to reduce their own power and ensure that their successors will not be allowed to behave as Trump has. One relatively straightforward way would involve legislation to convert the U.S. Department of Justice to an independent federal agency; the president would appoint its head, but to a fixed four-year term which could not be interrupted except for cause, under judicial oversight. The Senate should confirm no future Attorney General, in any event, unless the nominee is prepared to abandon the so called "OLC Memo" which effectively prohibits federal prosecution of a president while in office.

However, Trump has also created opportunities. We can hope that the Democrats will both recapture the Senate and be willing to completely repeal filibuster rules, but if both events do not come to pass, Trump's actions — which have been challenged by neither Republicans in Congress nor conservative jurists, so they can't legimiately complain — have created broad powers for a progressively minded president to go around Congress on actual emergencies, such as gun violence, economic inequality and climate change.

That's not ideal, but it's something the Dems need to be willing to do until the GOP is prepared to settle: Pass bipartisan, popular legislation on these issues and also restrain presidential power for the future. To sum up, a victory in 2020 must be no end, but a beginning of total war on conservative interests so that they learn there are consequences to the blanket presidential power they have seized in the last three years. Otherwise, the cycle will endlessly continue and freedom will be the price.
 
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