CBO #'s out 14MILL less insured by next year under TRUMPCARE, 24 mil by 2026

Jul 2015
33,172
24,598
Florida
#1
TV on mute, saw the above stats. Can't see if they are throwing out on any deficit #'s. Please feel free to fill in.

(Workers outside, have to be able to hear them knock on garage door).

Greg Nash - The HILL 409PM
The Congressional Budget Office projects that 14 million people will lose coverage by 2018 under the Republican ObamaCare replacement bill.


24 million would lose coverage by 2026.

The long-awaited analysis from the nonpartisan congressional scorekeeper is sure to shake up the debate over the measure, which is already facing sharp criticism from conservatives and many centrist Republicans.
The GOP bill repeals ObamaCare’s subsidies to buy coverage, replacing them with smaller tax credits, as well as the law’s Medicaid expansion after 2019. Both moves were expected to lead to coverage losses.

Republicans had expected that the CBO would show Americans losing coverage, and preemptively went on the offensive against the nonpartisan agency, whose director, Keith Hall, who was appointed by the GOP.
 
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Amelia

Former Staff
Jun 2014
45,963
27,864
Wisconsin
#2
The Congressional Budget Office projects that 14 million people will lose coverage by 2018 under the Republican ObamaCare replacement bill.

24 million would lose coverage by 2026.

The long-awaited analysis from the nonpartisan congressional scorekeeper is sure to shake up the debate over the measure, which is already facing sharp criticism from conservatives and many centrist Republicans.
CBO: Millions would lose coverage under GOP healthcare plan | TheHill
 

Amelia

Former Staff
Jun 2014
45,963
27,864
Wisconsin
#3
^^ The report is given at that link and does mention deficit, but I haven't yet read it.


Doing that now.
 

Amelia

Former Staff
Jun 2014
45,963
27,864
Wisconsin
#4
From the report

CBO and JCT estimate that enacting the legislation would reduce federal deficits by $337 billion over the 2017-2026 period. That total consists of $323 billion in on-budget savings and $13 billion in off-budget savings. Outlays would be reduced by $1.2 trillion over the period, and revenues would be reduced by $0.9 trillion.

The largest savings would come from reductions in outlays for Medicaid and from the elimination of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) subsidies for nongroup health insurance. The largest costs would come from repealing many of the changes the ACA made to the Internal Revenue Code—including an increase in the Hospital Insurance payroll tax rate for high-income taxpayers, a surtax on those taxpayers’ net investment income, and annual fees imposed on health insurers—and from the establishment of a new tax credit for health insurance.
 
Jul 2015
33,172
24,598
Florida
#6
AFTER 2026, deficit estimated to be reduced by about $337billion but then again the uninsured would go up. SO, how does one balance the 2??

PREMIUM WOULD INCREASE 15-20% THROUGH AT LEAST 2020 (don't know if that is per year or in aggregate).

Effects on the Federal Budget


CBO and JCT estimate that enacting the legislation would reduce federal deficits by $337 billion over the 2017-2026 period. That total consists of $323 billion in on-budget savings and $13 billion in off-budget savings. Outlays would be reduced by $1.2 trillion over the period, and revenues would be reduced by $0.9 trillion. The largest savings would come from reductions in outlays for Medicaid and from the elimination of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) subsidies for nongroup health insurance. The largest costs would come from repealing many of the changes the ACA made to the Internal Revenue Code—including an increase in the Hospital Insurance payroll tax rate for high-income taxpayers, a surtax on those taxpayers’ net investment income, and annual fees imposed on health insurers—and from the establishment of a new tax credit for health insurance.
 
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Amelia

Former Staff
Jun 2014
45,963
27,864
Wisconsin
#8
Looks like it's a national version of what Scott Walker has done here.

Part of the reduced deficit will come in the form of the federal government sending less money to states, so states will have to make cuts.

Just like part of Scott Walker's savings come from no longer sending cities as much of their money back, so our cities have to make cuts in services and education and the like.



For those who WANT to see states cut aid to the poor, that's a good thing, I guess.


But supposedly several Republican senators are not on board with that, so I hope they stay strong, and don't put up a mere token fight where the capitulate after getting tiny concessions.
 
Likes: 2 people
Sep 2014
56,061
11,612
United States
#9
AFTER 2026, deficit estimated to be reduced by about $337billion but then again the uninsured would go up. SO, how does one balance the 2??

PREMIUM WOULD INCREASE 15-20% THROUGH AT LEAST 2020 (don't know if that is per year or in aggregate).

Effects on the Federal Budget


CBO and JCT estimate that enacting the legislation would reduce federal deficits by $337 billion over the 2017-2026 period. That total consists of $323 billion in on-budget savings and $13 billion in off-budget savings. Outlays would be reduced by $1.2 trillion over the period, and revenues would be reduced by $0.9 trillion. The largest savings would come from reductions in outlays for Medicaid and from the elimination of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) subsidies for nongroup health insurance. The largest costs would come from repealing many of the changes the ACA made to the Internal Revenue Code—including an increase in the Hospital Insurance payroll tax rate for high-income taxpayers, a surtax on those taxpayers’ net investment income, and annual fees imposed on health insurers—and from the establishment of a new tax credit for health insurance.


Obamacare premiums are going up over 100% this year alone in AZ.