China Tariffs already kicking in

Jan 2016
41,541
37,314
Colorado
#41
Sherrod Brown was on CNBC this morning and they called him "the champion of tariffs." He has admitted they are a great tool to use. He also claimed its why democrats have trouble resonating with the working man anymore and many feel abandoned and that they favor college educated corporate workers. I think Brown might be considering running in 2020. I know many dont like that idea. But he is really out there nationally these days. He has Trumka on his side too from the AFL-CIO.
Brown doesn't seem to want the votes of those college educated voters. Do you think that's actually a winning strategy for a Democratic nominee?!??
 
Mar 2012
51,000
33,650
New Hampshire
#43
Brown doesn't seem to want the votes of those college educated voters. Do you think that's actually a winning strategy for a Democratic nominee?!??
First I dont see him running. He seems shy and not a presidential type person. However if he did, I do think he would do pretty well. I could definitely see him doing better than a Kamala Harris or an Elizabeth Warren. He is quiet spoken and is calm mannered. I dont see him beating a Bullock or a Hickenlooper but if they dont run and its a bunch of leftists or coastal ones, yes. My other issue in all this is we are almost certainly going to see an "anybody but Trump" in 2020. Which means its critical the dems put up a decent candidate. Someone nutty or too far left like Sanders is going to get an enormous backlash in 2022 and its back to the GOP. Ideally I want to see new candidates on both sides and great ones to pick from. But we are so polarized I dont know. I certainly can say as a moderate independent I will be looking to my dem pals to use good judgement and vote for someone moderate in 2020 primaries so we can vote for them. But I am not sure the outcome.
 
Likes: BigLeRoy
Jun 2014
43,160
42,012
United States
#44
[QUOTE="Eve1, post: 6089418, member: 28231"] I thought you liked Trump and his policies? No I guess not. It's only a matter of time until the Trump supporters wake up. A Chinese business man who had pledged to create 1 Million jobs in the US has pulled out of his commitment saying basically Trump's policies have proved the US is not the place for him to do business. Hmmm.....
?????

[QUOTE="Eve1, post: 6089418, member: 28231"]Actually no, the 70 and 80's were full of cheap cars from Japan and Korea. The first Honda Civic w\was a rust bucket and Hyundai couldn't wire a car properly at all. Over time however they got better and better and kept prices down while the US did the exact opposite, quality got cheaper with higher prices[/QUOTE]

TO NightSwimmer:

Say what? Wasn't 1986 in the 80's and please re-read my comment about Claudius?[/QUOTE]


Okay. Never mind Claudius.

Korea began selling a handful of cars in the US in the last 4 years of the 20 year period under discussion. The original Honda Civic was indeed prone to body rust in a salty environment, but that hardly means that all imported cars, or even that all imported Japanese cars during that time period were of poor quality. They were far superior to the products being turned out by US manufacturers at the time. That's why I preferred buying Japanese cars in the '70s and '80s. Domestic manufacturers have done a good job of catching up in terms of quality of design and build over the past few decades.
 
Likes: BigLeRoy
Jan 2016
41,541
37,314
Colorado
#46
First I dont see him running. He seems shy and not a presidential type person. However if he did, I do think he would do pretty well. I could definitely see him doing better than a Kamala Harris or an Elizabeth Warren. He is quiet spoken and is calm mannered. I dont see him beating a Bullock or a Hickenlooper but if they dont run and its a bunch of leftists or coastal ones, yes. My other issue in all this is we are almost certainly going to see an "anybody but Trump" in 2020. Which means its critical the dems put up a decent candidate. Someone nutty or too far left like Sanders is going to get an enormous backlash in 2022 and its back to the GOP. Ideally I want to see new candidates on both sides and great ones to pick from. But we are so polarized I dont know. I certainly can say as a moderate independent I will be looking to my dem pals to use good judgement and vote for someone moderate in 2020 primaries so we can vote for them. But I am not sure the outcome.
I think Hickenlooper IS running. But it is hard to see him navigating the primaries. It was funny, though, to hear the Chairman of the Colorado GOP WARNING Democrats against backing Hickenlooper the other day-----he was saying that Hickenlooper was far too moderate and pro-business to appeal to all the "leftists" and "socialists" that he said were in control of the Democrat Party these days. See, he's trying to warn the Democrats AWAY from Hickenlooper, because the Republicans FEAR facing a candidate like that, who would SWEEP the center, and would get a LOT of the left votes, because they certainly wouldn't be voting for Trump----and only some of them would be angry enough to vote for a Third Party ticket like Jill Stein. IF Hickenlooper could get the Dem Party nomination, he'd win against Trump in a landslide, I think.
 
Likes: bajisima
Sep 2014
4,401
1,267
South FL
#47
I went to buy some pizza in Midtown and sure enough I paid sales tax. Of course this was after paying income tax imposed on the dollars I was paying with. Taxes should be as low as possible but they are necessary. There are police, roads, courts....

If I ask how we should pay for roads, or a bridge, we can answer that many ways. One way of course is a gas tax. Of course taxing gas makes it more expensive. Fundamental equivalent of a tariff of course, its just bot imposed at the border. Semantic difference at best.

With respect to a bridge maintenance what if I said we will pay for it by resorting to income taxes but we're not going to let you cross the bridge. Not fair of course and naturally if that were me I'd favor shifting the cost of the bridge from income taxes to tolls.

The cost to defend international trade is enormous. We spend hundreds of billions of dollars to ensure Pax Americana. One way to pay for it is just part of general taxation which is mostly income taxes.

Well, let's examine that for a bit from Whirlpool's point of view.

America pays 1800-1900 per capita on defense spending and Korea spends somewhere on the order of 800-900. Korea, of course, then subsidizes the likes of LG and Samsung (among others like Hyundai/Kia), Whirlpool's mortal economic competitors even though South Korea is the one within artillery range of North Korea. Of course this situation is just a hangover from a time when South Korea was impoverished and wracked by war. That's not the case anymore, they're rolling Gangnam Style over there and in case you haven't visited the Rust Belt recently, swaths of it look like a 3rd world country.

Essentially you're asking people to pay taxes to protect and defend their government favored competitors.

That's going to rub people the wrong way and they're going to question how we should pay to defend international trade.

If Americans want to trade with foreigners, absolutely nothing with that, but imposing a tax on that trade for purposes of paying to protect that trade is no more odious than fact my sales tax on that NYC pizza pays for NYPD.
 

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