Class warfare? Yeah, and the middle class is losing...

Dec 2010
36,825
28,616
Virginia
President Obama shouldn’t be afraid of a little class warfare
By Sally Kohn, Published: September 23
On Monday, defending his plan to raise taxes on the rich to pay for job creation, President Obama said: “This is not class warfare, it’s math.”

No, Mr. President, this is class warfare — and it’s a war you’d better win. Corporate interests and the rich started it. Right now, they’re winning. Progressives and the middle class must fight back, and the president should be clear whose side he’s on.

The class war began in 1971. That year, soon-to-be Supreme Court justice Lewis F. Powell Jr. wrote a confidential memorandum to a friend at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about the “Attack of the American Free Enterprise System.” In the mid-20th century — from the New Deal to Social Security to environmental and civil rights laws — the government had cut into corporate profits while creating middle-class prosperity. Falsely believing that capitalism was under attack, Powell wrote: “It must be recognized that businessmen have not been trained or equipped to conduct guerrilla warfare with those who propagandize against the system.” His proposal, from which the modern conservative movement grew, was to equip business elites for that battle with aggressive policies to make Americans believe that what’s good for wealthy chief executives is good for them, too.

President Obama shouldn’t be afraid of a little class warfare - The Washington Post

Some interesting facts: 78% of all "business creators" touted by the Republicans as people who need to be protected from tax increases are single person operations. Tax cuts won't change this fact.

66% of all Americans think that a balanced approach of tax increases and spending cuts is the way to go. This includes Republicans.

81% of Americans don't trust the GOP to make the right decision.

While unemployment and poverty have exploded, so have corporate profits. Things have never been better for companies in the US, from a profit and loss standpoint.

Maybe it's time that President Obama actually stood up for the people who don't have millions to invest in hedge funds.

"At the Clinton Global Initiative conference in New York this past week, former president Bill Clinton said: “Whether you can win or not in a fight that’s worth fighting, get caught trying.” Instead of denying that there’s a class war in America, Obama must come out swinging for the good guys.

The good guys? Yeah, that would be you and me.
 
Jan 2011
31,198
4,336
Boise, Idaho
President Obama shouldn’t be afraid of a little class warfare
By Sally Kohn, Published: September 23
On Monday, defending his plan to raise taxes on the rich to pay for job creation, President Obama said: “This is not class warfare, it’s math.”

No, Mr. President, this is class warfare — and it’s a war you’d better win. Corporate interests and the rich started it. Right now, they’re winning. Progressives and the middle class must fight back, and the president should be clear whose side he’s on.

The class war began in 1971. That year, soon-to-be Supreme Court justice Lewis F. Powell Jr. wrote a confidential memorandum to a friend at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about the “Attack of the American Free Enterprise System.” In the mid-20th century — from the New Deal to Social Security to environmental and civil rights laws — the government had cut into corporate profits while creating middle-class prosperity. Falsely believing that capitalism was under attack, Powell wrote: “It must be recognized that businessmen have not been trained or equipped to conduct guerrilla warfare with those who propagandize against the system.” His proposal, from which the modern conservative movement grew, was to equip business elites for that battle with aggressive policies to make Americans believe that what’s good for wealthy chief executives is good for them, too.

President Obama shouldn’t be afraid of a little class warfare - The Washington Post

Some interesting facts: 78% of all "business creators" touted by the Republicans as people who need to be protected from tax increases are single person operations. Tax cuts won't change this fact.

66% of all Americans think that a balanced approach of tax increases and spending cuts is the way to go. This includes Republicans.

81% of Americans don't trust the GOP to make the right decision.

While unemployment and poverty have exploded, so have corporate profits. Things have never been better for companies in the US, from a profit and loss standpoint.

Maybe it's time that President Obama actually stood up for the people who don't have millions to invest in hedge funds.

"At the Clinton Global Initiative conference in New York this past week, former president Bill Clinton said: “Whether you can win or not in a fight that’s worth fighting, get caught trying.” Instead of denying that there’s a class war in America, Obama must come out swinging for the good guys.

The good guys? Yeah, that would be you and me.
from what liberal site did you get those false numbers?
 
Aug 2006
4,676
260
Valley of the Sun
Some interesting facts: 78% of all "business creators" touted by the Republicans as people who need to be protected from tax increases are single person operations. Tax cuts won't change this fact.
Oh, hey, another neat little fact: That other 22% percent ARE the job creators of this country (and they, along with the other 78%, fund your uneconomical government enterprises.)

And further we don't have jobs for the sake of having jobs. We have jobs so we can be PRODUCTIVE. Tax decreases would help with that.

A little thinking doesn't hurt, I promise.
 
Dec 2010
36,825
28,616
Virginia
Oh, hey, another neat little fact: That other 22% percent ARE the job creators of this country (and they, along with the other 78%, fund your uneconomical government enterprises.)

And further we don't have jobs for the sake of having jobs. We have jobs so we can be PRODUCTIVE. Tax decreases would help with that.

A little thinking doesn't hurt, I promise.
You're right, thinking doesn't hurt...I highly recommend you try it.

The 22% haven't created jobs despite having the lowest rate of taxation in the last fifty years. Why? Because the offshoring of jobs isn't being driven by taxes, it's being driven by comparative advantage. The cost of labor, in the countries where the 22% ARE creating jobs (you know...Vietnam, China, India, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh) is what determines where jobs are created. American workers can't compete because they can't live on a dollar a day, but that doesn't stop the corporatists from doing what they can to drive American wages down. Liz Warren has it exactly right, the 22% want to have the advantages of the social contract without having to bear any of the responsibilities. Net result of allowing this to happen has been that the rest of us have suffered. That's class warfare and the President needs to step up for the middle class and poor. If the 22% don't want to do their share they can leave and run the risk of having their assets truly expropriated by the countries they deem to be so "favorable" to their interests.
 
Aug 2006
4,676
260
Valley of the Sun
The 22% haven't created jobs despite having the lowest rate of taxation in the last fifty years.
Why do you think that? Because of a line on a graph?

You really need to think about what that graph represents. It cannot tell you if tax cuts are allowing jobs to be created (they are), it can only show you the current rate of unemployment. The vast number of other variables cannot be accounted for, and thus no causal relationship between the two can be shown on that graph.

That's why we've invented economic theory, to explain the process that is economic action.

It's from that quarter which your charges must be laid.

Liz Warren has it exactly right, the 22% want to have the advantages of the social contract without having to bear any of the responsibilities.
Oh, the mystical "social contract." The "contract" that my countrymen signed for me at birth which demands that MY life be spent working for them, if they demand it.

I see it for what it is. A deed to my life, in the hands of scum like Warren. A moral pretense for mindless brutes to claim my labor.

Net result of allowing this to happen has been that the rest of us have suffered.
The fact of the matter is that INFLATION is the true killer of the middle class. Inflation happens by a very specific means, it trickes down.

The people who get it first, get the most of it. Inflation (the creation of money) doesn't create purchasing power, it shifts it. And who gets it first?

But now we're getting off-topic. Your original point, that 78% of the businesses are single person operations, has absolutely no meaning in this context. Business are the creators of wealth, period. Government intervention can move it around, but ALL of our jobs come from those 100% of business owners. You recommend I try thinking? If this is what you mean by "thinking," no thanks.
 
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