College Women Can't Hold Their Liquor

Rasselas

Former Staff
Feb 2010
69,574
45,450
USA
#1
Or so that's the message sent by a high-ranking member of the DeVos Department of Education.
A Department of Education official apologized after saying that "90%" of sexual assault accusations on college campuses "fall into the category of 'we were both drunk,'" during an interview as Education Secretary Betsy DeVos prepares to meet Thursday with a range of advocacy groups to discuss the issue.Candice Jackson, who leads the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights, told the New York Times that for most sexual assault investigations, there's "not even an accusation that these accused students overrode the will of a young woman."

"Rather, the accusations — 90% of them — fall into the category of ‘we were both drunk,’ ‘we broke up, and six months later I found myself under a Title IX investigation because she just decided that our last sleeping together was not quite right,'" she said.
I'm glad Ms. Jackson apologized, but I don't see much follow up on the new Title IX regulations. Hard to believe that 90% of accusations are wrong, even manipulative and devious. Something like 80% are never reported.
 
Likes: 2 people
May 2012
67,589
13,315
By the wall
#3
Or so that's the message sent by a high-ranking member of the DeVos Department of Education. I'm glad Ms. Jackson apologized, but I don't see much follow up on the new Title IX regulations. Hard to believe that 90% of accusations are wrong, even manipulative and devious. Something like 80% are never reported.
Its quite high regardless of the number.

Its too common to just take the girls word for it anymore, you need a thorough investigation.

I believe that if its proven the girl was lying she should be sentenced for the same amount of time as someone convicted of rape.

Hopefully this will cut down on the false accusations.
 
Nov 2014
8,516
7,396
Canada
#4
Its quite high regardless of the number.

Its too common to just take the girls word for it anymore, you need a thorough investigation.

I believe that if its proven the girl was lying she should be sentenced for the same amount of time as someone convicted of rape.

Hopefully this will cut down on the false accusations.
Would you consider a "not guilty" verdict be enough "proof" the woman was lying?
 

Rasselas

Former Staff
Feb 2010
69,574
45,450
USA
#6
Its quite high regardless of the number.

Its too common to just take the girls word for it anymore, you need a thorough investigation.

I believe that if its proven the girl was lying she should be sentenced for the same amount of time as someone convicted of rape.

Hopefully this will cut down on the false accusations.
So you didn't get the part where the great majority of actual sexual assaults aren't reported, right?

What does "it's all too common" mean? Accusations of rape or other assault? Evidence suggests it's not common enough.

And we aren't talking about implications before the law, which are a separate issue. We're talking about universities' having the obligation to keep all students safe, regardless of gender.
 
Likes: 1 person
May 2012
67,589
13,315
By the wall
#8
Would you consider a "not guilty" verdict be enough "proof" the woman was lying?
No, it would need to be established that she made up the story.

Getting drunk and sleeping with a guy/guys then being so ashamed you cry rape should send you to prison for a long time.

A woman claiming rape who can't quite prove it does not mean she wasn't raped.

There is a difference here.
 

Davocrat

Former Staff
Apr 2007
51,043
37,288
Deep State
#9
Its quite high regardless of the number.

Its too common to just take the girls word for it anymore, you need a thorough investigation.

I believe that if its proven the girl was lying she should be sentenced for the same amount of time as someone convicted of rape.

Hopefully this will cut down on the false accusations.
I have share you low tolerance for people pretending to be other than how they really are. That's fundamental in my eyes.
 
May 2012
67,589
13,315
By the wall
#10
So you didn't get the part where the great majority of actual sexual assaults aren't reported, right?

What does "it's all too common" mean? Accusations of rape or other assault? Evidence suggests it's not common enough.

And we aren't talking about implications before the law, which are a separate issue. We're talking about universities' having the obligation to keep all students safe, regardless of gender.
How many actual cases would you like me to post of women making false accusations before you believe its too common?

And unless you give universities permission to violate privacy you are never going to protect all students.