Colleges are facing an existential threat

Feb 2011
16,497
5,756
Boise, ID
#21
UMass President Marty Meehan is sounding alarms that an “existential threat” could soon cripple higher education.

After the United States saw its college student population explode during the second half of the 20th century, overall enrollment has begun to decline in recent years — across the country and in school-saturated New England. In 2016, more than two thirds of private colleges and a majority of public colleges failed to meet their enrollment goals. Declining enrollment means declining tuition revenue — which in turn is increasing the financial pressure on colleges, particularly small schools.

And it’s about to get worse.

While the recent dip in enrollment — and subsequent row of college closures — has been attributed to a number of factors, experts say the enrollment trends are set to fall off a cliff. The reason is that the 2008 recession resulted in a historic downturn in the U.S. birth rate — effectively lighting the fuse of an 18-year time bomb for American colleges. Studies estimate that nearly 2.3 million fewer babies were born in the United States between 2008 and 2013, and the birth rate has continued to drop since then.

Some experts predict that anywhere from 25 percent to even 50 percent of private colleges will close over the next decade. “Make no mistake — this is an existential threat to entire sectors of higher education, and New England is, unfortunately, ground zero,” the former Massachusetts congressman said in his State of the University speech Monday night.

UMass president calls for online college to address 'existential threat' | Boston.com
Looks like it's time to start laying off the dozens of Assistants to the Assistant to the Assistant to the Assistant to the Vice Provost, and the Assistants to the Assistants to the Assistants to the 487 Deans in each university, and the 190 million other pointless administrative positions that have utterly exploded in college universities over the past half century.

The number of non-teaching administrative positions has absolutely exploded in recent decades, and that cost has been flung on kids and families. Universities need to refocus on efficiently delivering high quality education, and less on politics and boondoggle administration.

'Kill All The Administrators' (Not Really)
 
Jan 2016
50,039
45,998
Colorado
#22
Looks like it's time to start laying off the dozens of Assistants to the Assistant to the Assistant to the Assistant to the Vice Provost, and the Assistants to the Assistants to the Assistants to the 487 Deans in each university, and the 190 million other pointless administrative positions that have utterly exploded in college universities over the past half century.

The number of non-teaching administrative positions has absolutely exploded in recent decades, and that cost has been flung on kids and families. Universities need to refocus on efficiently delivering high quality education, and less on politics and boondoggle administration.

'Kill All The Administrators' (Not Really)
I am going to immediately report you to the Chief Top Head Deputy Assistant to the Vice Provost of the Dean of Admissions and Disciplinary Actions!

I've had it with you!
 

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
53,438
39,720
Ohio
#24
Looks like it's time to start laying off the dozens of Assistants to the Assistant to the Assistant to the Assistant to the Vice Provost, and the Assistants to the Assistants to the Assistants to the 487 Deans in each university, and the 190 million other pointless administrative positions that have utterly exploded in college universities over the past half century.

The number of non-teaching administrative positions has absolutely exploded in recent decades, and that cost has been flung on kids and families. Universities need to refocus on efficiently delivering high quality education, and less on politics and boondoggle administration.

'Kill All The Administrators' (Not Really)
Maybe that's who hires all those people with useless degrees...
 
Mar 2012
54,653
36,295
New Hampshire
#25
So why are people cheating and paying bribes for their kids to get into school if there's a shortage of students?
Because those were elite schools where there never is a shortage. The shortage is coming in certain areas with lesser known schools or an older population.
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
65,129
53,478
CA
#26
Got my degree in the arts. I have $0 debt due to scholarships and Florida Prepaid. Still don’t think my degree was worth it and I’m seriously considering going in to Stem Field as well. I am still researching. My current job could have been done on a basic community college degree. I have friends working in the enrollment department (guidance on enrollment) at the local university. They don’t require a degree to guide people to get degrees. And there are just so many jobs that require a degree, but the degree is less valuable than work experience (in or out of field).

Colleges have thrived on the idea that “everyone needs a degree.” Not the idea that they should be providing an education for the work force. They’ve become giant daycares. It is sad.

The STEM field is over saturated btw . When my husband's company put out an ad for a new IT director, got like 300 resumes. Been hearing the same from recent grads.

No, not everyone needs a degree. But colleges are not "daycare centers either. They teach a lot of things that you cannot find elsewhere and for sure if you have a degree, you make more money over your lifetime.
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
65,129
53,478
CA
#27
Looks like it's time to start laying off the dozens of Assistants to the Assistant to the Assistant to the Assistant to the Vice Provost, and the Assistants to the Assistants to the Assistants to the 487 Deans in each university, and the 190 million other pointless administrative positions that have utterly exploded in college universities over the past half century.

The number of non-teaching administrative positions has absolutely exploded in recent decades, and that cost has been flung on kids and families. Universities need to refocus on efficiently delivering high quality education, and less on politics and boondoggle administration.

'Kill All The Administrators' (Not Really)
Don't disagree with that all.

Too many at the top so to speak, just makes it that more expensive.
 
Dec 2018
2,759
1,017
Florida
#28
The STEM field is over saturated btw . When my husband's company put out an ad for a new IT director, got like 300 resumes. Been hearing the same from recent grads.

No, not everyone needs a degree. But colleges are not "daycare centers either. They teach a lot of things that you cannot find elsewhere and for sure if you have a degree, you make more money over your lifetime.
Depends on the “STEM” field. IT degree? What does that require? I was thinking more along the lines of stuff outside of “computers” and more along the lines of more specialized and practical fields. Medical for one.

And sadly. I think they are. And I think the statistic of “make more money” is thrown off by how many jobs require a degree but don’t need it. And consider that people who got a college degree are at some basic level able to show they can function as some form of cog in a wheel. Just having a degree doesn’t really add much value to them as a worker.
 
Mar 2012
54,653
36,295
New Hampshire
#29
Depends on the “STEM” field. IT degree? What does that require? I was thinking more along the lines of stuff outside of “computers” and so on.
IT falls under the computer science umbrella. Other STEM subjects are chemistry, physics, biology, pre med etc.
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
65,129
53,478
CA
#30
Depends on the “STEM” field. IT degree? What does that require? I was thinking more along the lines of stuff outside of “computers” and more along the lines of more specialized and practical fields. Medical for one.

And sadly. I think they are. And I think the statistic of “make more money” is thrown off by how many jobs require a degree but don’t need it. And consider that people who got a college degree are at some basic level able to show they can function as some form of cog in a wheel. Just having a degree doesn’t really add much value to them as a worker.
Medical would be a good choice IMO. Always a need for that.

My kids learned so much in college - things like critical thinking, research, etc. And it what it is. Most good paying jobs now require a degree (if you are talking business)

Also saw a big change in them after college in a good way. They learned to do so much on their own, that sometimes I feel useless :)

And the connections they made too have come in very handy.