Colleges welcoming homeschoolers

Mar 2012
57,883
39,438
New Hampshire
#1
A growing number of kids in the U.S. are homeschooled, and many colleges seeking to diversify their student bodies are welcoming them with open arms.

"While the percentage of homeschooled applicants is still tiny, admissions officers say their applications often stand out. They tend to have "thicker folders, in a good way," Amherst College dean of admission and financial aid Katie Fretwell told NBC News. They can be "innovative thinkers with a lot to bring to the table," she added, especially at a college like Amherst, where students have an open curriculum and independence in their studies."

"According to the National Home Education Research Institute, more than 2.2 million students in this country are taught at home, and that number is growing. Andrea Felder, director of freshman and international admissions at the University of Florida, told NBC News that homeschooled applicants are given the same consideration as students from traditional high school settings, with some additional requests.

"We do ask homeschooled applicants to provide us with scores from SAT Subject Tests in math (Level IIC), foreign language, science and social science. Homeschooled applicants are exempt from the SAT Subject Test requirement if they have completed two courses in a specific subject area at an accredited institution, such as a local high school."

Colleges Welcome Growing Number of Homeschooled Students - NBC News
 
Likes: 1 person

Djinn

Council Hall
Dec 2007
51,591
38,357
Pennsylvania, USA
#3
My only concern is that most homeschooling parents are not as knowledgeable as four years' worth of high school teachers (about 20 teachers). My daughter is in her first year of high school, and I'd say about 50% of her math homework covers subjects that I haven't touched in almost 30 years, and are almost foreign to me. By the time she learns trigonometry or calculus, I won't understand a single thing. Same goes for the sciences, geopolitical studies, etc. I would venture that very few homeschooling parents could pass a 12th grade final exam in a core subject - and virtually no homeschooling parents could pass a complete battery of all 9th - 12th grade final exams in all subjects.

I expect that any teacher is capable of passing a final in the subject for which they're responsible. An 11th-grade trigonometry teacher might not be able to pass a 12th-grade biology final - but I expect that the teacher WOULD pass the 11th-grade trig final.

So how can homeschooling parents realistically teach all subjects, grades 9-12?
 
Likes: 2 people

Snikitz

Former Staff
Mar 2011
13,627
5,094
Split between Minnesota and New Orleans
#4
My only concern is that most homeschooling parents are not as knowledgeable as four years' worth of high school teachers (about 20 teachers). My daughter is in her first year of high school, and I'd say about 50% of her math homework covers subjects that I haven't touched in almost 30 years, and are almost foreign to me. By the time she learns trigonometry or calculus, I won't understand a single thing. Same goes for the sciences, geopolitical studies, etc. I would venture that very few homeschooling parents could pass a 12th grade final exam in a core subject - and virtually no homeschooling parents could pass a complete battery of all 9th - 12th grade final exams in all subjects.

I expect that any teacher is capable of passing a final in the subject for which they're responsible. An 11th-grade trigonometry teacher might not be able to pass a 12th-grade biology final - but I expect that the teacher WOULD pass the 11th-grade trig final.

So how can homeschooling parents realistically teach all subjects, grades 9-12?
There are curriculum programs available to them online and if they stay on subject the kids stand to actually get more intensely focused education than in a regular classroom where public education teachers focus on teaching their students to sing "Obama Mmm MMM good!" instead of core subjects such as math, science or literature.
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
70,089
60,081
CA
#6
My only concern is that most homeschooling parents are not as knowledgeable as four years' worth of high school teachers (about 20 teachers). My daughter is in her first year of high school, and I'd say about 50% of her math homework covers subjects that I haven't touched in almost 30 years, and are almost foreign to me. By the time she learns trigonometry or calculus, I won't understand a single thing. Same goes for the sciences, geopolitical studies, etc. I would venture that very few homeschooling parents could pass a 12th grade final exam in a core subject - and virtually no homeschooling parents could pass a complete battery of all 9th - 12th grade final exams in all subjects.

I expect that any teacher is capable of passing a final in the subject for which they're responsible. An 11th-grade trigonometry teacher might not be able to pass a 12th-grade biology final - but I expect that the teacher WOULD pass the 11th-grade trig final.

So how can homeschooling parents realistically teach all subjects, grades 9-12?
I agree with that. My daughter did independent study though our district the last two years of high school because she wanted to graduate early. But she had to check in once a week with a teacher, take exams and hand in all her homework to her. When I looked at some of her math homework, it was way above my pay-grade. I believe most homeschooling programs have it set up so there are parents have resources to academic help if they can't provide it. It's not for everyone. It's easy to set aside or put off doing school work when you don't have a set schedule.
 
Likes: 1 person

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
70,089
60,081
CA
#7
There are curriculum programs available to them online and if they stay on subject the kids stand to actually get more intensely focused education than in a regular classroom where public education teachers focus on teaching their students to sing "Obama Mmm MMM good!" instead of core subjects such as math, science or literature.
Oh geez. My son ended up doing all 4 years at our public high school and got just as good an education as my daughter did. To the best of knowledge they never mentioned Obama except when talking about current events or world affairs.
 
Likes: 2 people
Mar 2012
57,883
39,438
New Hampshire
#8
My only concern is that most homeschooling parents are not as knowledgeable as four years' worth of high school teachers (about 20 teachers). My daughter is in her first year of high school, and I'd say about 50% of her math homework covers subjects that I haven't touched in almost 30 years, and are almost foreign to me. By the time she learns trigonometry or calculus, I won't understand a single thing. Same goes for the sciences, geopolitical studies, etc. I would venture that very few homeschooling parents could pass a 12th grade final exam in a core subject - and virtually no homeschooling parents could pass a complete battery of all 9th - 12th grade final exams in all subjects.

I expect that any teacher is capable of passing a final in the subject for which they're responsible. An 11th-grade trigonometry teacher might not be able to pass a 12th-grade biology final - but I expect that the teacher WOULD pass the 11th-grade trig final.

So how can homeschooling parents realistically teach all subjects, grades 9-12?
Probably not a lot, although a lot of the teaching is done via Youtube and the internet now. Here in New England, the growing trend of homeschoolers, tend to be Chinese or Indians new to America, who don't like the educational system here. The mom often gives up their jobs and teaches the kids. Many are doctors, engineers and such. My daughters roommate in college was the first homeschooled child I ever met and she had a mom that was very aggressive in her teaching.
 
Likes: 1 person

HCProf

Council Hall
Sep 2014
28,797
18,227
USA
#9
My only concern is that most homeschooling parents are not as knowledgeable as four years' worth of high school teachers (about 20 teachers). My daughter is in her first year of high school, and I'd say about 50% of her math homework covers subjects that I haven't touched in almost 30 years, and are almost foreign to me. By the time she learns trigonometry or calculus, I won't understand a single thing. Same goes for the sciences, geopolitical studies, etc. I would venture that very few homeschooling parents could pass a 12th grade final exam in a core subject - and virtually no homeschooling parents could pass a complete battery of all 9th - 12th grade final exams in all subjects.

I expect that any teacher is capable of passing a final in the subject for which they're responsible. An 11th-grade trigonometry teacher might not be able to pass a 12th-grade biology final - but I expect that the teacher WOULD pass the 11th-grade trig final.

So how can homeschooling parents realistically teach all subjects, grades 9-12?
My friend has a son who is home schooled right now and he logs in with his teacher and class everyday from his PC. His program is set up as a hybrid. He also can call her if he needs tutoring. My friend hired a college student to tutor him with his assignments, primarily math and language arts. It is not really the parents acting as teachers. They have a teacher. Hybrid is pretty cool, I teach a couple of college classes that way. We have set days where we log in together. I use Power Points and have screen sharing capability with a microphone. The students can also webcam if they like. I report attendance every 50 minutes. His classes are set up very similar to my hybrid college classes, same platform such as Black Board.
 
Likes: 2 people
Mar 2012
57,883
39,438
New Hampshire
#10
My friend has a son who is home schooled right now and he logs in with his teacher and class everyday from his PC. His program is set up as a hybrid. He also can call her if he needs tutoring. My friend hired a college student to tutor him with his assignments, primarily math and language arts. It is not really the parents acting as teachers. They have a teacher. Hybrid is pretty cool, I teach a couple of college classes that way. We have set days where we log in together. I use Power Points and have screen sharing capability with a microphone. The students can also webcam if they like. I report attendance every 50 minutes. His classes are set up very similar to my hybrid college classes, same platform such as Black Board.
From what I understand quite a few colleges and high schools are using hybrid classes. Part online, at home and some in class. Seems to be a growing trend. A lot of adults I know in the workforce are getting advanced degrees using online Masters programs. Its hard for people to work full time and then travel to class. This way makes it easier for them to advance. I think the term "homeschool" will be less used and we will see more online educations.
 
Likes: 1 person