Cultural appropriation can be beautiful lol

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
45,876
32,873
Toronto
#1
Unique, certainly lol

Olga Podluzhnaya aka Olena Uutai is a musician from Russia's Sakha-Yakutia Republic, in Northern Siberia, an expert in many musical instruments of the indigenous Sakha people there

including their signature mouth harp, the homus (see second vid above)

and in the traditional throat singing as well.

Last year, she even appeared on "Britain Got Talent" show in the UK

Beautiful woman who also models the various indigenous Sakha costumes in many great pics and calendars and such



What is interesting, is that she is NOT Sakha herself, she is a purebred white Slav girl, ethnic Ukrainian, to be exact

:D

FWIW, her husband is half-indigenous, at least, and it is his family's traditional native surname, Uutai, that she uses in her stage pseudonym


It's Russia though, it's not like in the West over there, they don't even really have terms like "cultural appropriation" (well, some liberals in Moscow may at times try to talk about such stuff, but they usually just get told to fuck off to America/Europe if like their values so much, and that's usually the end of such a conversation haha); looking at the comments under her videos, lots of native Sakha people posting there, all praising her for putting their traditional culture on the map out there... :)

The fact that she is bloody hot doesn't hurt either, I'm sure haha

;)

Here singing (in Russian) about the beauty of their home Republic with Saina, an actually ethnic Sakha singer

Cultural appropriation? Or simply appreciation of her local roots? You tell me...

I like it, either way :D
 
Jun 2011
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God Bless Texas
#2
CA is bullshit. I was watching the Last Samurai again recently and thinking about this. What if someone wanted to be Tom Cruise's character in it? Or Kasemoto's? I'm sure people did after that movie first came out.
 
Jun 2011
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God Bless Texas
#3
What if I want to be the Arabian Princess from Aladdin? I did LOVE Aladdin. The movie and the 'man' (IDK how old they are).
 
Likes: The Man

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
45,876
32,873
Toronto
#4
My personal opinion is that we should differentiate. Look at a given person's INTENT.

Something like blackface is obviously just mockery of other people for their race, and can never be acceptable.

But, wearing the traditional clothing of another culture can also be considered an expression of respect.

For instance, Russian Cossacks, in Northern Caucasus, my dad's people, despite their Slavic roots, have, over centuries, adopted the traditional dress and weapons, such as the kinjal dagger


similar to the nearby indigenous Caucasian peoples, like the Circassians

This was their way of showing appreciation for the Caucasians and their way of life, whom they had grown to respect as both neighbors in peace and, plenty of times, in those days, opponents in battle too lol

Here is a funny one for ya, btw, there is a folk group "Marusia" in Krasnodar, in Southern Russia, Cossack heartland; they are black people (mostly ex-foreign students who once came to Russia, to Krasnodar, from Africa, to study in university, and then stayed) who dress in Cossack costumes and sing traditional Cossack songs
:D LMFAO

Some actual Cossacks are offended by them. But many others think they are fucking hilarious, including even my dad! haha
 
Aug 2018
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Vancouver
#5
CA is bullshit. I was watching the Last Samurai again recently and thinking about this. What if someone wanted to be Tom Cruise's character in it? Or Kasemoto's? I'm sure people did after that movie first came out.
I don't object to anyone wearing those costumes, but that movie itself is among the worst cultural assimilation offenders going.

An American shows up and immediately reaches the rank of the elite of the elite. Fitting right in with locals raised from birth in their class as warriors, is showered with honours that no Japanese not of samurai birth would ever even dream of imagining, without learning a single word of their language but somehow being recognized as a leader regardless, single handedly leads samurai (wtfuck) and plays an integral role in the Satsuma rebellion, then meets the emperor and received the emperors respect and thanks. The emperor that any Japanese would be killed for making eye contact with.

I cant even say what would happen if the Japanese made a movie about a Japanese guy who goes to 1775 USA and teaches George Washington about freedom, bests all the Bostonians at their jobs, bangs a white woman, takes control of a militia unit, speaking no English, and then plays the key role in the American revolution while Paul revere and Ben Franklin stand around and say "this was only possible because of Kentaro" - because they would never have made that movie.
 
Jun 2011
49,206
20,638
God Bless Texas
#6
I don't object to anyone wearing those costumes, but that movie itself is among the worst cultural assimilation offenders going.

An American shows up and immediately reaches the rank of the elite of the elite. Fitting right in with locals raised from birth in their class as warriors, is showered with honours that no Japanese not of samurai birth would ever even dream of imagining, without learning a single word of their language but somehow being recognized as a leader regardless, single handedly leads samurai (wtfuck) and plays an integral role in the Satsuma rebellion, then meets the emperor and received the emperors respect and thanks. The emperor that any Japanese would be killed for making eye contact with.

I cant even say what would happen if the Japanese made a movie about a Japanese guy who goes to 1775 USA and teaches George Washington about freedom, bests all the Bostonians at their jobs, bangs a white woman, takes control of a militia unit, speaking no English, and then plays the key role in the American revolution while Paul revere and Ben Franklin stand around and say "this was only possible because of Kentaro" - because they would never have made that movie.
You don't remember the movie well. He learned the language. He spent a very long time earning respect, which was gained slowly.

When he goes to give the Emperor Kasemoto's sword he bows to the ground and does not look him in the eye.
 
Aug 2018
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Vancouver
#7
You don't remember the movie well. He learned the language. He spent a very long time earning respect, which was gained slowly.

When he goes to give the Emperor Kasemoto's sword he bows to the ground and does not look him in the eye.
My point was that the Satsuma rebellion was a real event. And is an important historical turning point. There were Americans and other westerners in Japan at the time working for the government as military advisors. But they would have been paid instructors. Paid labourers. A samurai would probably have killed a foreigner on sight, or killed himself in shame if prevented from doing so.
 
Likes: The Man
Feb 2015
16,618
8,358
sadness
#8
Unique, certainly lol

Olga Podluzhnaya aka Olena Uutai is a musician from Russia's Sakha-Yakutia Republic, in Northern Siberia, an expert in many musical instruments of the indigenous Sakha people there

including their signature mouth harp, the homus (see second vid above)

and in the traditional throat singing as well.

Last year, she even appeared on "Britain Got Talent" show in the UK

Beautiful woman who also models the various indigenous Sakha costumes in many great pics and calendars and such



What is interesting, is that she is NOT Sakha herself, she is a purebred white Slav girl, ethnic Ukrainian, to be exact

:D

FWIW, her husband is half-indigenous, at least, and it is his family's traditional native surname, Uutai, that she uses in her stage pseudonym


It's Russia though, it's not like in the West over there, they don't even really have terms like "cultural appropriation" (well, some liberals in Moscow may at times try to talk about such stuff, but they usually just get told to fuck off to America/Europe if like their values so much, and that's usually the end of such a conversation haha); looking at the comments under her videos, lots of native Sakha people posting there, all praising her for putting their traditional culture on the map out there... :)

The fact that she is bloody hot doesn't hurt either, I'm sure haha

;)

Here singing (in Russian) about the beauty of their home Republic with Saina, an actually ethnic Sakha singer

Cultural appropriation? Or simply appreciation of her local roots? You tell me...

I like it, either way :D
the whole concept is just more professional snowflaking.

Its ALL bullshit to whine and play the victim.

anyone whining about CA is just looking for something to whine about.
 
Jun 2011
49,206
20,638
God Bless Texas
#9
My point was that the Satsuma rebellion was a real event. And is an important historical turning point. There were Americans and other westerners in Japan at the time working for the government as military advisors. But they would have been paid instructors. Paid labourers. A samurai would probably have killed a foreigner on sight, or killed himself in shame if prevented from doing so.
Good Lord. It wasn't a documentary and did not pretend to be. It made sense why he first let him live. NA's also adopted worthy white people into their culture. You are saying the Samurai could not?
 

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