"Czechia" still not catching on

Helena

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Sep 2007
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#1
Thankfully. [MENTION=1719]Babba[/MENTION] I seem to recall we talked about this when the "alternative name" of the country was registered with the UN two years ago. I'm happy to see it has apparently not gained that much traction (yet?).

https://prague.tv/en/s72/Directory/c212-Relocation/n15056-Czechia-still-not-catching-on

The recommendation to use Czechia has been widely ignored, even by the Foreign Ministry. Czech ambassadors have been urged to use the short name, but not ordered to do so, ministry spokeswoman Michaela Lagronová said, according to Aktualne.cz.

The short version of the name also does not yet appear in European Union databases, although a change was finally requested in February at the urging of a civic initiative called Česko/Czechia. The group has a website making several arguments as to why Czechia is better. They claim, for example, the Czech Republic is political while Czechia is neutral. They also make linguistic and historical arguments.
Oh no, the word "republic" in the name of the country betrays the fact we're apparently trying to hide, that we aren't a monarchy. The horror.

I really don't see how this argument makes sense (NONE of their arguments make sense) because while many Czechs do use "Česko" in Czech and "Czechia" in English, to my dismay (and even though everyone who uses it automatically loses some of my respect, I have to admit not all of them are idiots; my best friend uses both the Czech and English "short form" too), it also can't be denied that Czechs generally use the word "republic" a lot where, say, Americans would use "country." Like, "the whole republic" or "living on the other side of the republic." So obviously not everyone is ashamed of us not being a kingdom or a sultanate.

Presented without comment:

Most English-speaking expats in the Czech Republic seem to prefer the long version of the name. Use of the name Czechia on expat social media platforms to ask questions such as “Can I buy Marmite in Czechia?” are more likely to stir up heated condemnation of the country's short-version name than any useful information on the availability of Marmite.
 
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Dec 2014
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#2
Agreed, the 'political' accusation sounds somewhat absurd because the term 'Republic' merely denotes the absence of a monarchy and its attendant aristocracy.

Strange.
 
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Babba

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Jul 2007
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#3
Thankfully. [MENTION=1719]Babba[/MENTION] I seem to recall we talked about this when the "alternative name" of the country was registered with the UN two years ago. I'm happy to see it has apparently not gained that much traction (yet?).

https://prague.tv/en/s72/Directory/c212-Relocation/n15056-Czechia-still-not-catching-on



Oh no, the word "republic" in the name of the country betrays the fact we're apparently trying to hide, that we aren't a monarchy. The horror.

I really don't see how this argument makes sense (NONE of their arguments make sense) because while many Czechs do use "Česko" in Czech and "Czechia" in English, to my dismay (and even though everyone who uses it automatically loses some of my respect, I have to admit not all of them are idiots; my best friend uses both the Czech and English "short form" too), it also can't be denied that Czechs generally use the word "republic" a lot where, say, Americans would use "country." Like, "the whole republic" or "living on the other side of the republic." So obviously not everyone is ashamed of us not being a kingdom or a sultanate.

Presented without comment:
Good. I can't stand the word Czechia.
 
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Ian Jeffrey

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#4
How is "Česko" properly pronounced? I am not familiar with the letter "Č," as it is not an entirely English letter.
 
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StanStill

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Dec 2013
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#5
Fine if you don't like Czechia, but you do need a one word name.

Maybe you can start spreading around Czeblic and see if that catches on?
 

Helena

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Sep 2007
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Maybe my user title will provide a clue.
#6
How is "Česko" properly pronounced? I am not familiar with the letter "Č," as it is not an entirely English letter.
It's pronounced the same as the "cz" in "Czech" or "ch" in "check."

The "long form" name of the country in Czech is Česká republika, feminine ("republic" is a she in Czech, and the adjective "Česká" therefore has the feminine suffix "-á"), whereas "Česko," like most Czech nouns ending in "-o," is of neutral gender. Maybe that appeals to some.

"-sko" is a common ending for Czech names for countries, too. Slovensko (Slovakia), Polsko (Poland), Maďarsko (Hungary), Rakousko (Austria), Španělsko (Spain). But there's also Itálie, Francie or Belgie.

Fine if you don't like Czechia, but you do need a one word name.

Maybe you can start spreading around Czeblic and see if that catches on?
I don't believe a one word name is necessary. Every time I hear "it's too long," I think "because most people are so economical with words, they never utter a single syllable that is not absolutely necessary for getting their point across, right?" But I admit "Czeblic" is a novel idea and the ring of it is not too bad. :)
 
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The Man

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#7
Russians refer to your country as "Chekhia" too lol

Or "Cheshskaya Respublika", but you'd only see that on formal documents and such. In everyday talk, it's "Chekhia" :D
 
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Helena

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Sep 2007
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#8
Russians refer to your country as "Chekhia" too lol

Or "Cheshskaya Respublika", but you'd only see that on formal documents and such. In everyday talk, it's "Chekhia" :D
I could be wrong, but based on how I think Russians pronounce that, it might actually be more of an equivalent to the Czech word "Čechy," i.e. Bohemia. So I don't mind that half as much. But that's another can of worms because many of my fellow citizens would be quick to inform you that Bohemia is just one part of the Czech Republic, there is also Moravia and Silesia. As the article I linked to says:

And while the group Česko/Czechia has been urging the shorter name, they have competition. A small group of Moravian activists has been urging the country adopt the name Czechomoravia, as it reminds people of Czechoslovakia and acknowledges the forgotten eastern half of the country.
 
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Helena

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Sep 2007
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#9
Oh, and I just remembered another example of how important the word (and / or concept of) "republic" is, locally speaking: when Czech courts issue verdicts, the opening formula is "The verdict in the name of the republic." And I believe that has been used ever since we became a republic in 1918. I don't think anything like that is said at US courts, or is it? [MENTION=23697]Ian Jeffrey[/MENTION]
 
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Ian Jeffrey

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#10
Oh, and I just remembered another example of how important the word (and / or concept of) "republic" is, locally speaking: when Czech courts issue verdicts, the opening formula is "The verdict in the name of the republic." And I believe that has been used ever since we became a republic in 1918. I don't think anything like that is said at US courts, or is it? [MENTION=23697]Ian Jeffrey[/MENTION]
Not that I have ever heard of.
 
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