Drought in the midwest

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
55,780
43,662
Ohio
Droughts have a long history in the US, and the world for that matter.

Nothing unusual but it does suck for those living through it.

Good news though, Its been far worse than it is today. :)
Yes, but now that we live in a global economy, droughts in one country affect everyone. Add to that speculation driving prices up even further, and you're likely to see rood riots, much like what happened during the rice shortage of 2008.
 
Feb 2011
18,565
13,366
The formerly great golden state
Well, it's not as though this is going to cause the price of substitutes to go down. They may seem lower by comparison, but it's going to hit a lot of people in the way of food inflation, and while eating healthier sounds good on paper, it's not easy for people with limited incomes.
Sounds like it may be time to quit wasting corn to make ethanol for fuel and start using it all for human and animal food.
 
May 2012
70,330
14,233
By the wall
Yes, but now that we live in a global economy, droughts in one country affect everyone. Add to that speculation driving prices up even further, and you're likely to see rood riots, much like what happened during the rice shortage of 2008.
This works both ways. Back in the depression we were fairly limited to what we could produce. When we ran out the country did. Now we have a better ability to import if we really run up against rough times.

Of course a global drought would change that but those are fairly rare.
 
Jun 2007
20,590
10,859
Wisconsin
It finally broke in the great state of Wisconsin. In the low 80's along Lake Michigan.
 

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
55,780
43,662
Ohio
This works both ways. Back in the depression we were fairly limited to what we could produce. When we ran out the country did. Now we have a better ability to import if we really run up against rough times.

Of course a global drought would change that but those are fairly rare.
Yeah, but what I would imagine happens is that in a global market, because Americans can afford to pay more, if there's a shortage of American crops, we begin buying more from overseas, leading to shortages in countries that don't have the means to compete in the market.
 
Feb 2011
18,565
13,366
The formerly great golden state
Yeah, but what I would imagine happens is that in a global market, because Americans can afford to pay more, if there's a shortage of American crops, we begin buying more from overseas, leading to shortages in countries that don't have the means to compete in the market.
Sounds like a formula for famine to me.

It also sounds like dry land farming as opposed to irrigated croplands.

Once the Ogalalla Aquifer is depleted, and the irrigated farmlands are lost to production, then food production will really begin to decline. We have basically the same situation in California. It normally doesn't rain here from May through October or so, the best growing season, and so crops are irrigated or don't grow. Meanwhile, the water table keeps going down and down every year.
 
Sep 2011
25,001
17,448
aMEEErica
Well, like I've been saying for years now, "GET BUSY AMERICA!"

Start putting a series of reservours off the Mississippi with a few of these bad boys...

[video=youtube;GF-c5Tn-Xhk]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GF-c5Tn-Xhk[/video]

They cost about $100 million dollars.

So for one month's worth of blowing things up in Iraq, we could have afforded 100 of those.

Now, I doubt the manufacturer could fill that order, but it just goes to show you what's available.

WATER is the new crude oil folks.

Water wars between countries could be just around the corner, Davey warns | Environment | guardian.co.uk

Thx :)
 
May 2012
70,330
14,233
By the wall
I am convinced that there is some sort of conspiracy or somebody is getting hella rich off the water problems in the west. Saudi Arabia supplies 70% of their country with fresh water through desalination plants and I have no idea why we aren't doing that here.



At a grand ceremony on April 28, King Abdullah pushed the buttons to allow the plant to begin operating. The plant, which cost 16 billion Saudi Ryals (US$ 3.8 billion) is expected to create 800,000 cubic meters of water for cities in the Eastern Province, as well as generate 2,750 megawatts of electricity.
Saudi Arabia Opens World's Largest Desalination Plant | Green Prophet
 

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
55,780
43,662
Ohio
Unintended consequences:

The worst U.S. drought in a half century is putting pressure on natural-gas drillers to conserve the millions of gallons of water used in hydraulic fracturing to free trapped gas and oil from underground rock.

From Texas to Colorado to Pennsylvania, farmers, activists and opponents of the technique, also known as fracking, are using the shortage of rain to push the industry to recycle water and reduce usage -- efforts that could prove costly to the industry.
:bounce:

Drought Helps Fracking Foes Build Momentum for Recycling - Bloomberg
 

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
55,780
43,662
Ohio
And now this:

In Iowa, nearly $10 million worth of sturgeon…dead. They’re valued at $110/pound because of their eggs, used for caviar.
Drought Killing Fish, Hurting Economy « FOX News Radio

So many fish died in Powerton Lake near the central Illinois city of Peoria that they clogged a water intake for a nearby power plant. Operators were forced to shut down one of the plant’s two generators because the coal-fired plant couldn’t take in enough water to cool it off.

*snip*


He estimated losses could stretch to hundreds of millions of dollars if the drought persists – it’s already the worst the country has seen since 1956.
Epic Mass Fish Deaths: This Time, Heat Is to Blame | NewsFeed | TIME.com