Egg freezing startups have doctors worried

Mar 2012
54,789
36,423
New Hampshire
#1
On a recent Tuesday night, a crowd of at least 100 women in their 20s and 30s gathered in a yellow-splashed loft space in Manhattan. Scented candles and tastefully potted plants filled the room. Relaxing music, the kind you might find in an upscale bar, played in the background. Laughter broke out when a pair of prosecco bottles were popped and glasses of bubbly were poured and passed out.

As the group sipped, Dr. Fahimeh Sasan, wearing a red fitted dress, walked to the front of the room. It was time to discuss the business at hand: egg freezing.

“The price we’re offering tonight is $5,000 per cycle, which includes anesthesia, retrieval and one year of storage,” she said. This gathering occurs often at Kindbody, one of a handful of new stand-alone egg freezing boutiques taking the fertility industry — and a nation of millennial women — by storm.

Over the last few years, start-up fertility establishments like Kindbody have become a popular alternative to traditional fertility clinics and hospitals — so much so that Wall Street is taking notice and traditional fertility doctors are issuing words of caution.

Doctors are growing worried by the rush to private egg-freezing facilities like Extend Fertility and Kindbody. Dr. Sherman Silber, head of the Infertility Center at St. Luke’s Hospital in St. Louis, helped pioneer the vitrification process that makes modern-day egg freezing possible. But he’s still concerned that private boutiques are more focused on wooing — and taking money from — patients than they are about providing quality care.

Silber said he’s concerned women who turn to profit-driven egg-freezing boutiques are not necessarily getting all of the information they need, especially when that information is being provided at cocktail party-themed informational sessions, like the ones Kindbody hosts.

Egg freezing ‘startups’ have Wall Street talking — and traditional fertility doctors worried
 
Likes: Madeline
Jun 2014
60,143
34,429
Cleveland, Ohio
#2
Not sure what medical information they need but don't have. Hopefully nothing that will cause birth defects.

But socially, there's pressure on young women to get this done so as to extend fertility. I'm 100% in favor of protecting a female's fertility, but it is a HUGE difference to giving birth at 25 rather than 45 or 65.

This needs more thought.
 
Likes: bajisima
Jul 2015
32,268
23,463
Florida
#4
Don't really see the problem. They're not going to have the fertility treatments and egg extractions at bars over wine. Medical professionals will have to get involved. Not to mention, paperwork will be involved.
 
Likes: Madeline
Jun 2014
60,143
34,429
Cleveland, Ohio
#5
Don't really see the problem. They're not going to have the fertility treatments and egg extractions at bars over wine. Medical professionals will have to get involved. Not to mention, paperwork will be involved.
Hopefully this is safe, although nobody knows the effect of having a baby with an ovum that wss frozen for 20, 30 years.
 
Mar 2012
54,789
36,423
New Hampshire
#6
Don't really see the problem. They're not going to have the fertility treatments and egg extractions at bars over wine. Medical professionals will have to get involved. Not to mention, paperwork will be involved.
As long as we dont find out its a scam years down the road. The problem is these women are putting up good money to store these eggs. What happens if these companies go out of business? Many fear the eggs get caught up in litigation or just destroyed. Then we have women in their 40s wanting their eggs and they are gone. We saw this last year when a few clinics failed to pay bills and the power was shut off ruining their eggs. Profit seems to be the motive here.
 

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
53,488
39,822
Ohio
#8
As long as we dont find out its a scam years down the road. The problem is these women are putting up good money to store these eggs. What happens if these companies go out of business? Many fear the eggs get caught up in litigation or just destroyed. Then we have women in their 40s wanting their eggs and they are gone. We saw this last year when a few clinics failed to pay bills and the power was shut off ruining their eggs. Profit seems to be the motive here.
Okay, that made me laugh a little.
 

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