Ending HIV: A Missing Piece in the Health-Care Debate

Sep 2013
38,812
30,791
On a hill
#1
For the Republican presidential candidates, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has been a sort of collective punching bag. Every single candidate wants a repeal of the health-care law, which was a stinging victory for President Obama and the Democrats. Donald Trump would replace it with something vague and "terrific." Sen. Ted Cruz essentially foreshadowed his candidacy by shutting down the government over the ACA. Sen. Marco Rubio has called it "fatally flawed."

Health care is certain to be one of the most partisan debates of the upcoming election, and even Democrats are arguing over the issue now that Bernie Sanders has unveiled his single-payer "Medicare for All" proposal.

What we haven't heard in the presidential debates is that the ACA - or a universal, single-payer health-care system - is crucial for combatting HIV/AIDS. Activists and public health experts agree that people living with HIV or at risk of contracting the virus are already benefiting from the ACA, which provides crucial pieces to the puzzle of fighting HIV/AIDS across the population.

snip

The United States has come a long way since the early days of HIV/AIDS, but the epidemic is far from over. In medicine, stigma has largely been replaced by science, and today no mainstream politician in their right mind would say they support anything but ending HIV/AIDS. In politics, however, facts are known to disappear in clouds of rhetoric and emotion. Many politicians routinely oppose public health policies that experts say are necessary to reduce the number of new infections, even when these policies could save billions of dollars in medical costs and untold numbers of lives.

Ending HIV: A Missing Piece in the Health-Care Debate
 
Likes: 1 person
Sep 2013
38,812
30,791
On a hill
#2
When the virus is suppressed, it's less likely to be transmitted to others.
Fortunately, we know that conservatives never have sex outside marriage, so exposure to HIV is of no concern to them.
 

Djinn

Council Hall
Dec 2007
48,203
34,005
Pennsylvania, USA
#3
I like the way that all of them said "We'll keep the pre-existing condition clause!" and "We'll remove the mandate!"

... And none of them explained how that would be possible.

Remove the mandate, and keep the pre-existing condition clause, and it would be possible to pass on any health coverage until you have a medical condition. Then just buy insurance, enjoy the coverage while you need it, and then drop the insurance once it's no longer necessary. That would completely destroy the system.
 

ARMCX1

Former Staff
Jun 2013
14,813
9,601
SoCal
#4
HIV became a disease to live with about 20 years ago with combinations of anti-mitotic analogs, drugs that inhibited host and viral proteases necessary for the HIV life cycle and anti-retrovirals. Those achievements were a combination of public and private funded research and commercial development of the fruits of that research.

I wouldn't deny that public health played and continues to play an important role in management of the disease and its many complications. Social workers and nurses are at the frontline of assuring compliance with best practices.
 
Sep 2013
38,812
30,791
On a hill
#5
I like the way that all of them said "We'll keep the pre-existing condition clause!" and "We'll remove the mandate!"

... And none of them explained how that would be possible.

Remove the mandate, and keep the pre-existing condition clause, and it would be possible to pass on any health coverage until you have a medical condition. Then just buy insurance, enjoy the coverage while you need it, and then drop the insurance once it's no longer necessary. That would completely destroy the system.
Guess they haven't thought that one through.
 
Apr 2010
17,615
19,062
Oregon
#7
I like the way that all of them said "We'll keep the pre-existing condition clause!" and "We'll remove the mandate!"

... And none of them explained how that would be possible.

Remove the mandate, and keep the pre-existing condition clause, and it would be possible to pass on any health coverage until you have a medical condition. Then just buy insurance, enjoy the coverage while you need it, and then drop the insurance once it's no longer necessary. That would completely destroy the system.
Shit, what is that? Logic?

Get outta here
 
Feb 2015
15,474
7,623
sadness
#8
For the Republican presidential candidates, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has been a sort of collective punching bag. Every single candidate wants a repeal of the health-care law, which was a stinging victory for President Obama and the Democrats. Donald Trump would replace it with something vague and "terrific." Sen. Ted Cruz essentially foreshadowed his candidacy by shutting down the government over the ACA. Sen. Marco Rubio has called it "fatally flawed."

Health care is certain to be one of the most partisan debates of the upcoming election, and even Democrats are arguing over the issue now that Bernie Sanders has unveiled his single-payer "Medicare for All" proposal.

What we haven't heard in the presidential debates is that the ACA - or a universal, single-payer health-care system - is crucial for combatting HIV/AIDS. Activists and public health experts agree that people living with HIV or at risk of contracting the virus are already benefiting from the ACA, which provides crucial pieces to the puzzle of fighting HIV/AIDS across the population.

snip

The United States has come a long way since the early days of HIV/AIDS, but the epidemic is far from over. In medicine, stigma has largely been replaced by science, and today no mainstream politician in their right mind would say they support anything but ending HIV/AIDS. In politics, however, facts are known to disappear in clouds of rhetoric and emotion. Many politicians routinely oppose public health policies that experts say are necessary to reduce the number of new infections, even when these policies could save billions of dollars in medical costs and untold numbers of lives.

Ending HIV: A Missing Piece in the Health-Care Debate

wrong....

The single most crucial thing for combatting HIV/AIDS is..... personal responsibility

this is a preventable disease

dont share needles
use a condom
dont fuck around

crying you have aids is only the afterthought that costs the tax payers millions.