Everyone Knows. Attacks on Jews in NYC on the rise.

Macduff

Moderator
Apr 2010
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Pittsburgh, PA
The incidents now pass without much notice, a steady, familiar drumbeat of violence and hate targeting visibly Jewish people in New York City.

….

The increase in the number of physical assaults against Orthodox Jews in New York City is a matter of empirical fact. Anti-Semitic hate crimes against persons, which describes nearly everything involving physical contact, jumped from 17 in 2017 to 33 in 2018, with the number for the first half of 2019 standing at 19, according to the NYPD’s hate crime unit. Jews are the most frequent targets of hate crimes in New York City, and have been for some time (although this number is somewhat skewed by the fact that swastikas, which are by far the city’s most common hate incident, are automatically categorized as an anti-Jewish hate crime).
And yet, many believe the attacks are even more widespread than has been reported. “Since I was a victim, I’ve heard from other people,” Yehuda told Tablet. “I know of four stories where they didn’t report it.”

...

An honest reckoning with the problem carries plenty of its own risks. The spike in incidents complicates the current national political narrative around anti-Semitism, which maps a narrow left-right paradigm on to Jews and their terrorizers. The overwhelming majority of the alleged perpetrators in New York are either black or Hispanic, and casting anti-Semitism as an issue pitting Jews against various other minority groups threatens to reagitate problems that many in the Jewish and surrounding communities hope no longer exist.

But perhaps there’s a vaguer and simpler motive behind the city’s trepidation: Like the collapse of the transit system or out-of-control living costs, anti-Semitism is a challenge that feels too large for the city to meet. And unlike those issues, the problem of anti-Semitic hate crimes is hazy and localized, and the outcry it provokes is manageable, muted, sometimes nonexistent. As long as the city can ignore the scope of what it’s up against, there’s little or no pressure to address the problem.

Yaacov Behrman, a Crown Heights-based educator and member of the local community board, believes that a sociological study of attitudes toward Jews among the city’s young people is an essential first step to countering anti-Semitism. Such an investigation might involve anonymous questionnaires administered in public schools. He doubts it will ever happen. “Personally I think the city is scared of what they’re gonna find and never do it,” he told Tablet. “I think the city is concerned they’ll find anti-Semitism numbers are very high in Brooklyn.”

Jews are Routinely Being Attacked in the Streets of New York City. Why Does No One Care?

You'd think that a rise in people openly physically attacking members of a marginalized group in public would be a bigger deal.
 
Jul 2019
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2,710
Atlanta
The incidents now pass without much notice, a steady, familiar drumbeat of violence and hate targeting visibly Jewish people in New York City.

….

The increase in the number of physical assaults against Orthodox Jews in New York City is a matter of empirical fact. Anti-Semitic hate crimes against persons, which describes nearly everything involving physical contact, jumped from 17 in 2017 to 33 in 2018, with the number for the first half of 2019 standing at 19, according to the NYPD’s hate crime unit. Jews are the most frequent targets of hate crimes in New York City, and have been for some time (although this number is somewhat skewed by the fact that swastikas, which are by far the city’s most common hate incident, are automatically categorized as an anti-Jewish hate crime).
And yet, many believe the attacks are even more widespread than has been reported. “Since I was a victim, I’ve heard from other people,” Yehuda told Tablet. “I know of four stories where they didn’t report it.”

...

An honest reckoning with the problem carries plenty of its own risks. The spike in incidents complicates the current national political narrative around anti-Semitism, which maps a narrow left-right paradigm on to Jews and their terrorizers. The overwhelming majority of the alleged perpetrators in New York are either black or Hispanic, and casting anti-Semitism as an issue pitting Jews against various other minority groups threatens to reagitate problems that many in the Jewish and surrounding communities hope no longer exist.

But perhaps there’s a vaguer and simpler motive behind the city’s trepidation: Like the collapse of the transit system or out-of-control living costs, anti-Semitism is a challenge that feels too large for the city to meet. And unlike those issues, the problem of anti-Semitic hate crimes is hazy and localized, and the outcry it provokes is manageable, muted, sometimes nonexistent. As long as the city can ignore the scope of what it’s up against, there’s little or no pressure to address the problem.

Yaacov Behrman, a Crown Heights-based educator and member of the local community board, believes that a sociological study of attitudes toward Jews among the city’s young people is an essential first step to countering anti-Semitism. Such an investigation might involve anonymous questionnaires administered in public schools. He doubts it will ever happen. “Personally I think the city is scared of what they’re gonna find and never do it,” he told Tablet. “I think the city is concerned they’ll find anti-Semitism numbers are very high in Brooklyn.”

Jews are Routinely Being Attacked in the Streets of New York City. Why Does No One Care?

You'd think that a rise in people openly physically attacking members of a marginalized group in public would be a bigger deal.
Well, this is not good.
 

boontito

Future Staff
Jan 2008
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Most Insidious
You'd think that a rise in people openly physically attacking members of a marginalized group in public would be a bigger deal.
It should be.

And I completely believe the quote in the article that the number is probably even higher. So much of this type of stuff goes unreported by victims for a variety of reasons.
 
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Jan 2014
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The incidents now pass without much notice, a steady, familiar drumbeat of violence and hate targeting visibly Jewish people in New York City.

….

The increase in the number of physical assaults against Orthodox Jews in New York City is a matter of empirical fact. Anti-Semitic hate crimes against persons, which describes nearly everything involving physical contact, jumped from 17 in 2017 to 33 in 2018, with the number for the first half of 2019 standing at 19, according to the NYPD’s hate crime unit. Jews are the most frequent targets of hate crimes in New York City, and have been for some time (although this number is somewhat skewed by the fact that swastikas, which are by far the city’s most common hate incident, are automatically categorized as an anti-Jewish hate crime).
And yet, many believe the attacks are even more widespread than has been reported. “Since I was a victim, I’ve heard from other people,” Yehuda told Tablet. “I know of four stories where they didn’t report it.”

...

An honest reckoning with the problem carries plenty of its own risks. The spike in incidents complicates the current national political narrative around anti-Semitism, which maps a narrow left-right paradigm on to Jews and their terrorizers. The overwhelming majority of the alleged perpetrators in New York are either black or Hispanic, and casting anti-Semitism as an issue pitting Jews against various other minority groups threatens to reagitate problems that many in the Jewish and surrounding communities hope no longer exist.

But perhaps there’s a vaguer and simpler motive behind the city’s trepidation: Like the collapse of the transit system or out-of-control living costs, anti-Semitism is a challenge that feels too large for the city to meet. And unlike those issues, the problem of anti-Semitic hate crimes is hazy and localized, and the outcry it provokes is manageable, muted, sometimes nonexistent. As long as the city can ignore the scope of what it’s up against, there’s little or no pressure to address the problem.

Yaacov Behrman, a Crown Heights-based educator and member of the local community board, believes that a sociological study of attitudes toward Jews among the city’s young people is an essential first step to countering anti-Semitism. Such an investigation might involve anonymous questionnaires administered in public schools. He doubts it will ever happen. “Personally I think the city is scared of what they’re gonna find and never do it,” he told Tablet. “I think the city is concerned they’ll find anti-Semitism numbers are very high in Brooklyn.”

Jews are Routinely Being Attacked in the Streets of New York City. Why Does No One Care?

You'd think that a rise in people openly physically attacking members of a marginalized group in public would be a bigger deal.
MacDuff,

Why are liberals and minorities so anti-Semitic?
 

Rev. Hellh0und

Former Staff
Jul 2011
69,982
14,380
315 bowery/DMS
The incidents now pass without much notice, a steady, familiar drumbeat of violence and hate targeting visibly Jewish people in New York City.

….

The increase in the number of physical assaults against Orthodox Jews in New York City is a matter of empirical fact. Anti-Semitic hate crimes against persons, which describes nearly everything involving physical contact, jumped from 17 in 2017 to 33 in 2018, with the number for the first half of 2019 standing at 19, according to the NYPD’s hate crime unit. Jews are the most frequent targets of hate crimes in New York City, and have been for some time (although this number is somewhat skewed by the fact that swastikas, which are by far the city’s most common hate incident, are automatically categorized as an anti-Jewish hate crime).
And yet, many believe the attacks are even more widespread than has been reported. “Since I was a victim, I’ve heard from other people,” Yehuda told Tablet. “I know of four stories where they didn’t report it.”

...

An honest reckoning with the problem carries plenty of its own risks. The spike in incidents complicates the current national political narrative around anti-Semitism, which maps a narrow left-right paradigm on to Jews and their terrorizers. The overwhelming majority of the alleged perpetrators in New York are either black or Hispanic, and casting anti-Semitism as an issue pitting Jews against various other minority groups threatens to reagitate problems that many in the Jewish and surrounding communities hope no longer exist.

But perhaps there’s a vaguer and simpler motive behind the city’s trepidation: Like the collapse of the transit system or out-of-control living costs, anti-Semitism is a challenge that feels too large for the city to meet. And unlike those issues, the problem of anti-Semitic hate crimes is hazy and localized, and the outcry it provokes is manageable, muted, sometimes nonexistent. As long as the city can ignore the scope of what it’s up against, there’s little or no pressure to address the problem.

Yaacov Behrman, a Crown Heights-based educator and member of the local community board, believes that a sociological study of attitudes toward Jews among the city’s young people is an essential first step to countering anti-Semitism. Such an investigation might involve anonymous questionnaires administered in public schools. He doubts it will ever happen. “Personally I think the city is scared of what they’re gonna find and never do it,” he told Tablet. “I think the city is concerned they’ll find anti-Semitism numbers are very high in Brooklyn.”

Jews are Routinely Being Attacked in the Streets of New York City. Why Does No One Care?

You'd think that a rise in people openly physically attacking members of a marginalized group in public would be a bigger deal.




Growing up here, especially in brooklyn, the hassidics, orthodox and black kids would often fight, most of the anti-semitic attacks in NYC are from african americans that's just a statistical fact and stems from basically encroachment.
 
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The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
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Growing up here, especially in brooklyn, the hassidics, orthodox and black kids would often fight, most of the anti-semitic attacks in NYC are from african americans that's just a statistical fact and stems from basically encroachment.
Encroachment by whom? Jews into black neighborhoods? Or blacks into Jewish neighborhoods?

Anyhow, my opinion?

The cause is likely same as for anti-Semitism in Russia too: envy.

Over there, just as in America, Jews tend to be successful, well educated, work in well paying jobs, and are wealthy, because of this. Some are VERY wealthy: majority of Putin's oligarchs, as I have mentioned before, are Jews, the folks who control all of Russia's biggest companies and run the economy for Putin (and also help hide and launder his own massive ill gotten wealth; and participate in his influence ops abroad; etc lol). These are billionaires. Very, very rich people.

Many Jews also there among top artists, authors, scientists. And in government too, though not at very too echelons, nowhere near the Kremlin (Russians would not out with Jews achieving THAT level of power, it would cause all out riots and instability); but there have been and are mayor and governors of ethnic Jewish background.

It all creates resentment towards the Jews from among the poor, lower classes of Slavic society.

And, of course, also, some of the Russian Muslims maybe sympathize with the Palestinians and blame ALL Jews, including their fellow citizens, for Israel's actions too...

But, in my opinion, it is especially the former, envy. Likely it plays out similarly among black Americans in New York, with them being poorer and more disadvantaged compared to the Jews...
 

Macduff

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Apr 2010
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Pittsburgh, PA
It should be.

And I completely believe the quote in the article that the number is probably even higher. So much of this type of stuff goes unreported by victims for a variety of reasons.
They address that briefly at the link.

David Neiderman, a rabbi and the longtime executive director of the United Jewish Organizations of Williamsburg, says he thinks instances of anti-Semitism in his community escape official attention, since reporting is often time-consuming or interferes with religious observance. “It’s very difficult to get someone to complain. … I know it’s underreported.”
 
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The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
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Toronto
It probably stems from their belief that Israel is the puppet master behind American foreign policy. Omar has basically said as much.
Well, Trump does constantly go on about Israel, doesn't he? Even his latest Tweets, demanding they (the four Congresswomen) apologize to "the people of Israel", for whatever reason. As if he is President of Israel, rather than the US...
 

Macduff

Moderator
Apr 2010
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Pittsburgh, PA
Growing up here, especially in brooklyn, the hassidics, orthodox and black kids would often fight, most of the anti-semitic attacks in NYC are from african americans that's just a statistical fact and stems from basically encroachment.
That's one of the theories for the increase; Jews being blamed for gentrification.
 
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