Everything You Always Wanted To Know About The SR-71

Sep 2011
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The moment a Belgian mechanic accidentally destroys an F-16 fighter jet with cannon
A Belgian mechanic destroyed a multi-million pound fighter jet after he accidentally fired a Vulcan cannon while carrying out repairs at an air force base. The £15m plane quickly caught fired and exploded, according to Belgian broadcaster RTL.





Huh.. four more and that mechanic can be an ace :zany:



I would not have have been in that persons shoes. OUCH!, and that’s one Hell of a f*** up. LOL
The biggest hazard I faced on the sim, was perhaps "dropping" the MSD ("Multiple Situation Display") black box, the main black box in the F-111 cockpit that cost almost three-quarters of a million $.

It was bulky, heavy, awkward and had to be taken out by hand.

This unit had some of the first "integrated avionics" with the air to air radar picture, the ground return for the look-down radar, the E-scan when flying in terrain following radar, and also a computer-generated horizon line, all in one very expensive black box.

I'm glad I didn't have to work around explosives, directly anyway, you might have your shit in one sock, but what about the fresh troop next to you?

We had a SSgt on the F-4 who got burned because he asked another troop, an SRA to go and turn off the main switch on the wall...

He was trying to swap a circuit breaker in one of the many "racks" of electronic systems, the pliers ended up melting into his hand..

What we used to call, "big sparks."

He learned a lesson there: "Never ask someone else to go turn off the switch or assure some safety procedure, get off your lazy butt and make sure it is done!"

I of course knew better than that anyway, duh.

Thx :)
 
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The biggest hazard I faced on the sim, was perhaps "dropping" the MSD ("Multiple Situation Display") black box, the main black box in the F-111 cockpit that cost almost three-quarters of a million $.

It was bulky, heavy, awkward and had to be taken out by hand.

This unit had some of the first "integrated avionics" with the air to air radar picture, the ground return for the look-down radar, the E-scan when flying in terrain following radar, and also a computer-generated horizon line, all in one very expensive black box.

I'm glad I didn't have to work around explosives, directly anyway, you might have your shit in one sock, but what about the fresh troop next to you?

We had a SSgt on the F-4 who got burned because he asked another troop, an SRA to go and turn off the main switch on the wall...

He was trying to swap a circuit breaker in one of the many "racks" of electronic systems, the pliers ended up melting into his hand..

What we used to call, "big sparks."

He learned a lesson there: "Never ask someone else to go turn off the switch or assure some safety procedure, get off your lazy butt and make sure it is done!"

I of course knew better than that anyway, duh.

Thx :)
No doubt. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. I haven't seen too much crazy stuff that was caused by mechanics in the Herc world. I did see quit a few things caused by pilots that attributed to buku maintenance. Examples include hard landings and over speeds / over torques. Mostly, if not all preventable by the drivers (Zeros ;)).
I definitely saw some silly things on straight jets. Most of the time it was attributed to being in a hurry and sometimes poor training / unqualified Mx troops. One particular Time at Travis AFB CA I saw somebody turn over a crane onto its side because the mechanic did not deploy the outriggers (that's crane 101) prior to removing a KC-10 Ring Cowl. I actually felt bad bad for the Pro-Super because he had the unfortunate task to call / talk to the Maintenance group Commander (Full Bird) at like 0300. CC's are not usually happy at that time of the morning. :neutral:. I have dealt with that pain once or twice, and yes it sucks making that phone call and dealing with the Full Bird. :oops:
 
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No doubt. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. I haven't seen too much crazy stuff that was caused by mechanics in the Herc world. I did see quit a few things caused by pilots that attributed to buku maintenance. Examples include hard landings and over speeds / over torques. Mostly, if not all preventable by the drivers (Zeros ;)).
I definitely saw some silly things on straight jets. Most of the time it was attributed to being in a hurry and sometimes poor training / unqualified Mx troops. One particular Time at Travis AFB CA I saw somebody turn over a crane onto its side because the mechanic did not deploy the outriggers (that's crane 101) prior to removing a KC-10 Ring Cowl. I actually felt bad bad for the Pro-Super because he had the unfortunate task to call / talk to the Maintenance group Commander (Full Bird) at like 0300. CC's are not usually happy at that time of the morning. :neutral:. I have dealt with that pain once or twice, and yes it sucks making that phone call and dealing with the Full Bird. :oops:
We had a standard safety film, you might have seen the same.

One incident is a troop in the cockpit of a parked craft playing pretend "fighter pilot" who assumes the guns are unloaded and fires off a burst... didn't hurt anyone.

The other incident is a troop in the wheel well of a B-52 on the ground while another troop in the cockpit retracts the landing gear...

"Remember, a technical order IS AN ORDER!"

Thx :)
 
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We had a standard safety film, you might have seen the same.

One incident is a troop in the cockpit of a parked craft playing pretend "fighter pilot" who assumes the guns are unloaded and fires off a burst... didn't hurt anyone.

The other incident is a troop in the wheel well of a B-52 on the ground while another troop in the cockpit retracts the landing gear...

"Remember, a technical order IS AN ORDER!"

Thx :)
Oh yea I recall "Remember, a tech order IS AN ORDER" mantra LOL. I remember going to a few Base Commander Calls at Travis, and the subject of following orders, and doing things by the book came up. Us MX group guys were immediately like yea, and we would say do what the TO tells you what to do. It's basically a direct order. The Medical group guys looked at us like DAFUQ. o_O

I remember this video played some.

 
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Oh yea I recall "Remember, a tech order IS AN ORDER" mantra LOL. I remember going to a few Base Commander Calls at Travis, and the subject of following orders, and doing things by the book came up. Us MX group guys were immediately like yea, and we would say do what the TO tells you what to do. It's basically a direct order. The Medical group guys looked at us like DAFUQ. o_O

I remember this video played some.

I remember the guy almost sucked into the intruder, I thought for sure he was a goner!

Didn't see the inverted splat into the parked aircraft on the deck though, that must have been one of the worst carrier accidents ever!

I always took TOs seriously, from the very first few days in boot camp I realized that these guys "knew something" and that knowledge was hard won by many years of trial and error, they had seen pretty much all of it before... so when they say do something this way and this way alone, I figured there were good reasons and repercussions avoided down the line: "there is a reason we do the things we do the way we do them."

One time a troop of ours was on floor waxing detail for a week, she wanted to do an extra good job on the officer's floor...

She used acetone instead of just dilute bleach in the mop water... 20 minutes later the floor started to swell and bubble up, lol!

So even something like that can burn you!

But, at least no one was hurt, except her pride.

Thx :)
 
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I remember the guy almost sucked into the intruder, I thought for sure he was a goner!

Didn't see the inverted splat into the parked aircraft on the deck though, that must have been one of the worst carrier accidents ever!

I always took TOs seriously, from the very first few days in boot camp I realized that these guys "knew something" and that knowledge was hard won by many years of trial and error, they had seen pretty much all of it before... so when they say do something this way and this way alone, I figured there were good reasons and repercussions avoided down the line: "there is a reason we do the things we do the way we do them."

One time a troop of ours was on floor waxing detail for a week, she wanted to do an extra good job on the officer's floor...

She used acetone instead of just dilute bleach in the mop water... 20 minutes later the floor started to swell and bubble up, lol!

But, at least no one was hurt.

Thx :)
Yea no doubt. Usually warnings / notes / cautions in the TO / job guide was there for a reason also. Usually because some dope messed up, so extra emphasis was put into those books for troops to "get it". But yea, there definitely has to be an order / sequence in Maintenance concerning Aircraft anyway.

On a different note, I remember every time I took the WAPS (SKT part) test for rank, and I would remember reading the part about how the test was written by guys (SNCO's) knowledgeable about the subject yada yada yada. I can remember numerous times looking at the cover of the SKT booklet, and double checking it to make sure that I was taking the right test. :). Man I hated taking those WAPS test. :(
 
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No doubt. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. I haven't seen too much crazy stuff that was caused by mechanics in the Herc world. I did see quit a few things caused by pilots that attributed to buku maintenance. Examples include hard landings and over speeds / over torques. Mostly, if not all preventable by the drivers (Zeros ;)).
I definitely saw some silly things on straight jets. Most of the time it was attributed to being in a hurry and sometimes poor training / unqualified Mx troops. One particular Time at Travis AFB CA I saw somebody turn over a crane onto its side because the mechanic did not deploy the outriggers (that's crane 101) prior to removing a KC-10 Ring Cowl. I actually felt bad bad for the Pro-Super because he had the unfortunate task to call / talk to the Maintenance group Commander (Full Bird) at like 0300. CC's are not usually happy at that time of the morning. :neutral:. I have dealt with that pain once or twice, and yes it sucks making that phone call and dealing with the Full Bird. :oops:
You know how a '9' skill level, supervisor level, if you can follow TOs, well a 9 level should theoretically be able to supervise any shop... they are just reading TOs...

So they put a 9 level former tire shop supervisor in charge of CRS for the T-38s at Holloman.

And it was all good until they were short an engine stand and the supervisor had a dozen troops line up to pull the engine by hand...

(A buck Sgt said "Hey, um, wait a minute here..." :p)

I just wonder where they were going to put it once/if they removed it... set it on the floor? (Put it um, back in the aircraft...?)

Thx :D
 
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You know how a '9' skill level, supervisor level, if you can follow TOs, well a 9 level should theoretically be able to supervise any shop... they are just reading TOs...

So they put a 9 level former tire shop supervisor in charge of CRS for the T-38s at Holloman.

And it was all good until they were short an engine stand and the supervisor had a dozen troops line up to pull the engine by hand...

(A buck Sgt said "Hey, um, wait a minute here..." :p)

I just wonder where they were going to put it once/if they removed it... set it on the floor? (Put it um, back in the aircraft...?)

Thx :D
No doubt about it. I have seen 3 levels smarter than some 9 levels I knew LOL. I think the biggest problem I had with some 9 levels, as a young AF guy, was that they seemed to have forgotten where they came from. I couldn't count the times I would ask myself why in the f*** are we doing a whole bunch of maintenance when we didn't necessarily have to. Some of those 9 levels couldn't plan for s***, and had zero common sense. :smirk:

I did feel sorry for some pro-supers when I was a TSgt expediter that I worked for. A Few Pro-Supers I knew had an Avionics background, and didn't know a heck of a lot about the Airframe / Engines or pretty much anything else other than Avionics. The ones that were cool, I helped out as much as I could. The ones I didn't like not so much LOL. I don't think I would have been a very productive / effective Pro-Super without having a well rounded background of the Aircraft. That's my very opinionated statement. I'm sure some people would probably not agree with me from the Aircraft Avionics world LOL.
 
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Here is a vid that says the F-111 killed more armored vehicles in DS than the A-10.


A lot of detail on my old bird, our sim was the 'D' model and had all the high tech goodies.

He mentions it is mostly a penetration bomber, top speed of mach 2.5 (which I could never get even close to in our sim) but that things would start melting, lol.

Thx :)
 
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