Facial recognition being used to catch petty criminals

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
77,315
46,720
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
I am sure its all legal because its a public event....
Basically, yes. In public, your movements are public and there is no reasonable expectation of privacy. And on someone else's property, the government cannot intrude without a warrant, but of course the property owner is a different story.

That said, your concerns are well-founded. The government tends to want to remove any reasonable expectation of privacy we might have. The original case on wiretapping, Katz v. United States, 389 U.S. 347 (1967), involved the warrantless wiretapping of a call from a phone booth. Supreme Court said, "uh uh."
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
77,315
46,720
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
Why would you be arrested, wouldn't you just be asked questions as part of an investigation or is it different in America?
It is hard for me to say if it is "different," simply because I am unfamiliar with UK police procedure - referring to actual rather than regulation. Here, the key question to ask is, "Am I free to go?" If the answer is yes, you can go and they cannot ask you any questions, because ... well, you have left; if the answer is no, then you are in custody (not necessarily "under arrest"), and certain rights kick in. Either way, it does not work out well for the police, so they avoid answering the question and keep trying to manipulate you into answering - which is not illegal. There are certain rights an individual should keep in mind, because the police will deliberately attempt to work around them because it makes the investigation easier - especially if you are the target of the investigation, which they need not tell you...
 
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Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
77,315
46,720
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
And as part of the questioning, they run warrant checks. You got an unpaid traffic ticket, you're going to jail.
In my state, you cannot go to jail for a simple traffic ticket, and therefore cannot go to jail for failing to pay it.
Then you lose your job for missing work, maybe not, but I've been arrested for computer mistakes in CA, and not only was my car towed but I lost my job.
Sounds like there might have been a potential legal action of some kind in that somewhere...
 

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
55,704
43,564
Ohio
In my state, you cannot go to jail for a simple traffic ticket, and therefore cannot go to jail for failing to pay it.

Sounds like there might have been a potential legal action of some kind in that somewhere...
Long story but I had gotten a ticket for driving on a suspended license which I took care of, but 6 years later it came back as a warrant because I failed to get an "abstract" which I didn't know I needed. I still had the copy of the the court thingie that they gave me at home, but I couldn't afford bail so I had to wait 4 days (4th of July weekend) to see a judge and he let me go on time served. When I went to get my car out of impound they'd broken my tie rod and told me it was like that. I had a job subcontracting to paint trim for newly stuccoed houses and the paint was in the trunk. My boss threatened to file embezzlement charges for not showing up and disappearing with his paint.

I gave him his paint back, but I lost the job.

The original DSL was from 1982, I was issued another license in 84 which had expired, but when I got arrested in 87 I had no idea the charge had reappeared.

Anyway, a million different things can happen that render you unable to prove they made a mistake if they make one. And since I am unaware if this technology is accessible to people to prove they haven't committed a crime (for example if you were in a public place when you supposedly committed a crime) I just see it as another hurdle to overcome when you're detained and the cops don't listen to you, which they never do.
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
77,315
46,720
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
Long story but I had gotten a ticket for driving on a suspended license which I took care of, but 6 years later it came back as a warrant because I failed to get an "abstract" which I didn't know I needed. I still had the copy of the the court thingie that they gave me at home, but I couldn't afford bail so I had to wait 4 days (4th of July weekend) to see a judge and he let me go on time served.
Ah, now that is something altogether different. In my state, driving while suspended can be a violation (ticket), misdemeanor or felony ... depending on the reason for the suspension. But the same rule applies: if it is not a jailable offense to begin with, you cannot be arrested or jailed for it.
When I went to get my car out of impound they'd broken my tie rod and told me it was like that.
Yeah, they all say that kind of stuff. Chances are it was accidental and they just could not have cared less.
I had a job subcontracting to paint trim for newly stuccoed houses and the paint was in the trunk. My boss threatened to file embezzlement charges for not showing up and disappearing with his paint.

I gave him his paint back, but I lost the job.
Sounds like a job worth losing. Or, at least, a boss worth losing.
Anyway, a million different things can happen that render you unable to prove they made a mistake if they make one. And since I am unaware if this technology is accessible to people to prove they haven't committed a crime (for example if you were in a public place when you supposedly committed a crime) I just see it as another hurdle to overcome when you're detained and the cops don't listen to you, which they never do.
Very likely. Of course, information can be subpoenaed from third parties, and if the state has it they must turn it over.
 
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