Feds investigate how suspected white supremacist -- a felon -- obtained arsenal

Oct 2010
42,991
20,748
A place not infested with lying partisan hacks
#1
Federal agents are trying to determine how a suspected Ohio white supremacist with a felony conviction for manslaughter acquired a cache of 18 assault weapons and other firearms, along with high-capacity magazines and more than 40,000 rounds of ammunition, according to federal law enforcement officials and court documents reviewed by NBC News.

The storehouse of weapons was discovered late last month when FBI agents arrested Richard Schmidt, 47, the owner of a Bowling Green sporting goods store called Spindletop Sports Zone, on charges of marketing counterfeit goods -- such as football jerseys with NFL logos -- from China.

Although initially portrayed as a probe into the thriving international market for counterfeit clothing, the case took a surprising turn this week when the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Cleveland unsealed search warrants and an indictment also charging Schmidt with illegal possession of firearms.
Advertise | AdChoices

According to the documents, FBI agents who searched Schmidt’s sporting goods store and four trailers behind it, found a stash of weapons that included AR-15 assault rifles, Ruger and Sig Sauer semi-automatic pistols, bulletproof body armor and high-capacity magazines as well as ammunition.

The agents also discovered evidence of Schmidt’s ties to the neo-Nazi movement, documents show. Among the evidence seized, according to search warrants, was a video of a national convention of the neo-Nazi National Socialist Movement; bumper stickers of the National Alliance party, another neo-Nazi group; a “Jewish 500” list -- a supposed roster of Jewish-owned businesses -- and paraphernalia from the “Waffen SS,” Adolph Hitler’s Nazi military force in Germany from the early 1930s through World War II, according to the search warrants.

Feds investigate how suspected white supremacist -- a felon -- obtained arsenal - Open Channel

If this investigation leads to the people who made these weapons and ammo available to a felon should charges be filed against them?

Should this happen and they're shown to have acted irresponsibly by allowing a felon to obtain such weapons from them...should this have and effect on whether they can own such weapons themselves?
 

johnflesh

Former Staff
Feb 2007
26,852
19,473
Colorado
#4
Yes charges should be filed, as providing weapons to a felon is against the law. But, like any gun on the streets, good luck tracking it all down.
 
Oct 2010
42,991
20,748
A place not infested with lying partisan hacks
#5
Yes charges should be filed, as providing weapons to a felon is against the law. But, like any gun on the streets, good luck tracking it all down.
Guns are traced by to the original purchaser and dealer all of the time.

Take the case of that nut who set his house on fire an gunned down the first responders...he was a felon and if i'm not mistaken it didn't take them long at all to trace the name of the purchaser who happened to be a lady that was his neighbor.
 

johnflesh

Former Staff
Feb 2007
26,852
19,473
Colorado
#6
Guns are traced by to the original purchaser and dealer all of the time.

Take the case of that nut who set his house on fire an gunned down the first responders...he was a felon and if i'm not mistaken it didn't take them long at all to trace the name of the purchaser who happened to be a lady that was his neighbor.
That isn't always the case. Some guns are untraceable. We'll see though eh?
 
Jan 2008
32,903
9,708
Vertiform City
#9
Unbelievable.

They gotta spend federal money to find out "how" this guy got his guns?

They don't know?

WTF... :smiley-shrug: