Florida Man Killed By A Cassowary That He Owned

Jan 2016
48,351
44,339
Colorado
#11
That bird can grow up to 5 feet tall and 160 pounds. Florida has the scariest critters. Huge snakes, lizards, birds and bugs. o_O
I'd say Australia has us beat when it comes to having the scariest critters. After all, northeastern Australia (and New Guinea, which used to be connected to Australia during the Ice Age) is where cassowaries come from.

And when the ancestors of the Australian Aborigines first arrived in Australia, during what they call the Dreamtime, they would have encountered Megalania, the most frightening predator humans have ever come into conflict with, a relic from the Age of the Dinosaurs. Think of Komodo Dragons, because Megalania is related, but about three times as big:

Megalania - Wikipedia
 
Sep 2012
14,035
17,748
SoCal
#12
That bird can grow up to 5 feet tall and 160 pounds. Florida has the scariest critters. Huge snakes, lizards, birds and bugs. o_O
They don't belong in FL. Being a 'breeder' of the birds, he should have known the danger. I have a friend who bred Emus which can also be quite dangerous.

Cassowaries (/ˈkæsəwɛəri/), genus Casuarius, are ratites (flightless birds without a keel on their sternum bone) that are native to the tropical forests of New Guinea (Papua New Guinea and Indonesia), East Nusa Tenggara, the Maluku Islands, and northeastern Australia.[3]
There are three extant species. The most common of these, the southern cassowary, is the third-tallest and second-heaviest living bird, smaller only than the ostrich and emu.
Cassowaries feed mainly on fruit, although all species are truly omnivorous and will take a range of other plant food, including shoots and grass seeds, in addition to fungi, invertebrates, and small vertebrates. Cassowaries are very wary of humans, but if provoked they are capable of inflicting serious injuries, occasionally fatal, to dogs and people.

...MORE...

Wiki~
 
Apr 2019
96
48
Southeast
#13
That bird can grow up to 5 feet tall and 160 pounds. Florida has the scariest critters. Huge snakes, lizards, birds and bugs. o_O
Shit! Oz is the only place on earth where over 50% of snakes are venomous. Dont even go in the surf, everything from the tiny, blue ring octopus to stone fish and all manner of other critters, can kill you. Oz is a very unique place, evolutionarily speaking, but yes, Florida is not without it's perils. I was born and raised there.
 
Apr 2019
96
48
Southeast
#14
I'd say Australia has us beat when it comes to having the scariest critters. After all, northeastern Australia (and New Guinea, which used to be connected to Australia during the Ice Age) is where cassowaries come from.

And when the ancestors of the Australian Aborigines first arrived in Australia, during what they call the Dreamtime, they would have encountered Megalania, the most frightening predator humans have ever come into conflict with, a relic from the Age of the Dinosaurs. Think of Komodo Dragons, because Megalania is related, but about three times as big:

Megalania - Wikipedia
To be fair, this was extinct before man, but check this out.

Entelodont - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entelodont

Entelodonts — sometimes facetiously termed hell pigs or terminator pigs — are an extinct family of pig-like omnivores of the forests and plains of North America, Europe, and Asia from the late Eocene to middle Miocene epochs (37.2—15.97 million years ago), existing for about 21.23 million years.
Daeodon · ‎Andrewsarchus · ‎Archaeotherium · ‎Cetancodontamorpha
 
Likes: Friday13
Jan 2016
48,351
44,339
Colorado
#15
To be fair, this was extinct before man, but check this out.

Entelodont - Wikipedia
Entelodont - Wikipedia

Entelodonts — sometimes facetiously termed hell pigs or terminator pigs — are an extinct family of pig-like omnivores of the forests and plains of North America, Europe, and Asia from the late Eocene to middle Miocene epochs (37.2—15.97 million years ago), existing for about 21.23 million years.
Daeodon · ‎Andrewsarchus · ‎Archaeotherium · ‎Cetancodontamorpha
Well, much closer in time to humans are the terror birds of South and Central America, reaching into the southern parts of North America, which survived until at LEAST 1.8 million years ago-----and there have been occasional claims that they survived until much more recently, perhaps recently enough to have encountered humans. They certainly would have been TERRIFYING:

Phorusrhacidae - Wikipedia

Phorusrhacids, colloquially known as terror birds, are an extinct clade of large carnivorous flightless birds that were the largest species of apex predators in South America during the Cenozoic era; their conventionally accepted temporal range covers from 62 to 1.8 million years (Ma) ago.[3][4]

They ranged in height from 1–3 m (3 ft 3 in–9 ft 10 in) tall. Their closest modern-day relatives are believed to be the 80-centimetre-tall (31 in) seriemas. Titanis walleri, one of the larger species, is known from Texas and Florida in North America. This makes the phorusrhacids the only known large South American predator to migrate north in the Great American Interchange that followed the formation of the Isthmus of Panama land bridge (the main pulse of the interchange began about 2.6 Ma ago; Titanis at 5 Ma was an early northward migrant).[5]

It was once believed that T. walleri became extinct in North America around the time of the arrival of humans,[6] but subsequent datings of Titanis fossils provided no evidence for their survival after 1.8 Ma.[7] However, reports from Uruguay of new findings of relatively small forms dating to 18,000[8] and 96,000[1] years ago would imply that phorusrhacids survived there until very recently (i.e., until the late Pleistocene); the initial report of such a recent date has been questioned.[9]
 
Likes: all9Yards
Apr 2019
96
48
Southeast
#16
Well, much closer in time to humans are the terror birds of South and Central America, reaching into the southern parts of North America, which survived until at LEAST 1.8 million years ago-----and there have been occasional claims that they survived until much more recently, perhaps recently enough to have encountered humans. They certainly would have been TERRIFYING:

Phorusrhacidae - Wikipedia

Phorusrhacids, colloquially known as terror birds, are an extinct clade of large carnivorous flightless birds that were the largest species of apex predators in South America during the Cenozoic era; their conventionally accepted temporal range covers from 62 to 1.8 million years (Ma) ago.[3][4]

They ranged in height from 1–3 m (3 ft 3 in–9 ft 10 in) tall. Their closest modern-day relatives are believed to be the 80-centimetre-tall (31 in) seriemas. Titanis walleri, one of the larger species, is known from Texas and Florida in North America. This makes the phorusrhacids the only known large South American predator to migrate north in the Great American Interchange that followed the formation of the Isthmus of Panama land bridge (the main pulse of the interchange began about 2.6 Ma ago; Titanis at 5 Ma was an early northward migrant).[5]

It was once believed that T. walleri became extinct in North America around the time of the arrival of humans,[6] but subsequent datings of Titanis fossils provided no evidence for their survival after 1.8 Ma.[7] However, reports from Uruguay of new findings of relatively small forms dating to 18,000[8] and 96,000[1] years ago would imply that phorusrhacids survived there until very recently (i.e., until the late Pleistocene); the initial report of such a recent date has been questioned.[9]
Have seen these in Fl. Wonder if any relation? The Crested CaraCara

 
Likes: BigLeRoy
Jan 2016
48,351
44,339
Colorado
#17
Have seen these in Fl. Wonder if any relation? The Crested CaraCara

The caracaras belong to the falcon family, Falconidae. That family is most closely related to pelicans (believe it or not), and then to other birds such as vultures, storks, spoonbills, herons, penguins, loons, ibis, and then a bit more distantly, flamingos. They are not closely related at all to the terror birds, which are descended from a much more primitive line of birds going back to the Early Tertiary period. Those terror birds were really relics of the Age of Dinosaurs, too! Having said all that, there is still a lot about the phylogeny of birds that we don't know. We'd LOVE to have some DNA from those terror birds!
 
Likes: all9Yards
Apr 2019
96
48
Southeast
#18
The caracaras belong to the falcon family, Falconidae. That family is most closely related to pelicans (believe it or not), and then to other birds such as vultures, storks, spoonbills, herons, penguins, loons, ibis, and then a bit more distantly, flamingos. They are not closely related at all to the terror birds, which are descended from a much more primitive line of birds going back to the Early Tertiary period. Those terror birds were really relics of the Age of Dinosaurs, too! Having said all that, there is still a lot about the phylogeny of birds that we don't know. We'd LOVE to have some DNA from those terror birds!
I remember a day in Fl, years ago. A river was up, a flood plain was flooded. This was in the middle of the state, about 70 miles from the Gulf. There were no less than 12 species (likely many more, that was my cursory count) The most notable were white pelicans and rosette spoonbills. Thousands of birds, the floodplain was receeding, leaving many marooned fish in a shallow and broad plain.

Beat all i ever seen, white pelicans so far inland.
 
Likes: BigLeRoy