For Jews, America was once exceptional. Now, anti-Semitism is as strong here as in Europe.

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
78,135
47,904
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
For Jews, America was once exceptional. Now, anti-Semitism is as strong here as in Europe.
Joshua Safran, Opinion contributor
(You may have to open the link in an incognito window. --IJ)

One of the things I’ve cherished most about being an American is the ability to walk around as a Jew without terrorists actively plotting to kill me. Over the years I’ve taken this freedom for granted, even while recognizing that it’s a luxury and a privilege that arguably only America has been able to provide. As any readily identifiable Jew traveling abroad will tell you, most of the rest of the world is stuck in the Dark Ages by comparison.

...

We American Jews have been left with an understandable sense of American exceptionalism. We come from a free country, a place where you can pray if you want to, wherever you want to, whenever you want to, and no one can or will do anything about it. As Jews, we were guaranteed religious liberty by none other than George Washington, in his 1790 letter to the Jews of Newport, and we danced with the Torah, firm in our faith in the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment. From 1790 to today, American Jews had a good 229 year run of religious freedom.

On Oct. 27, 2018, an accused terrorist shouted, “All Jews must die!” and murdered 11 people, wounding seven more, during Shabbat morning services at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh. Jewish communities across America, including my own in Portland, Oregon, held their breath. Was this a one-off aberration? Or did this portend a new direction for the land of the free?

We received our answer last week on the last day of Passover, when another gunman shot up another synagogue, this time at the Chabad of Poway, near San Diego. According to the accused terrorist's manifesto, he was seeking to send Jews to where they belong, namely, to hell. One murdered and three wounded this time.


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The question is not whether it will happen again, but where it will happen next. This is why my synagogue (among many others) has armed guards, and some armed members, for Shabbat and holiday services (which is when the most people are there - during the week, far fewer).
 
Oct 2014
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C-A-N-A-D-A-Eh
You mean that you can't just bring in cultures without considering that some cultures have historical beefs with other groups and accepting that steps may be needed to keep these conflicting groups at arms length or more?
 
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Nov 2016
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USA
For Jews, America was once exceptional. Now, anti-Semitism is as strong here as in Europe.
Joshua Safran, Opinion contributor
(You may have to open the link in an incognito window. --IJ)

One of the things I’ve cherished most about being an American is the ability to walk around as a Jew without terrorists actively plotting to kill me. Over the years I’ve taken this freedom for granted, even while recognizing that it’s a luxury and a privilege that arguably only America has been able to provide. As any readily identifiable Jew traveling abroad will tell you, most of the rest of the world is stuck in the Dark Ages by comparison.

...

We American Jews have been left with an understandable sense of American exceptionalism. We come from a free country, a place where you can pray if you want to, wherever you want to, whenever you want to, and no one can or will do anything about it. As Jews, we were guaranteed religious liberty by none other than George Washington, in his 1790 letter to the Jews of Newport, and we danced with the Torah, firm in our faith in the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment. From 1790 to today, American Jews had a good 229 year run of religious freedom.

On Oct. 27, 2018, an accused terrorist shouted, “All Jews must die!” and murdered 11 people, wounding seven more, during Shabbat morning services at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh. Jewish communities across America, including my own in Portland, Oregon, held their breath. Was this a one-off aberration? Or did this portend a new direction for the land of the free?

We received our answer last week on the last day of Passover, when another gunman shot up another synagogue, this time at the Chabad of Poway, near San Diego. According to the accused terrorist's manifesto, he was seeking to send Jews to where they belong, namely, to hell. One murdered and three wounded this time.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The question is not whether it will happen again, but where it will happen next. This is why my synagogue (among many others) has armed guards, and some armed members, for Shabbat and holiday services (which is when the most people are there - during the week, far fewer).
I fear that religious bigotry in general, and antisemitism in particular, have been around, but more or less in the closet, to some extent, considered by many to be inappropriate, morally repugnant, or just plain politically incorrect.

Now, I’m afraid, with today’s political climate, anti semites seem to feel emboldened to come out of the closet, to the point of proudly proclaiming their bigotry (remember “Jews will not replace us?”). It’s not surprising that some in their midst seem to feel that they now have a license to kill.
 
Jun 2013
18,771
16,773
Here
Antisemitism is as strong as it ever was in America.

The irony appears to be that a man in the Oval Office who said someone like David Duke was a problem in 2006, in 2016, said he didn't know anything about David Duke, while at the same time supporting Netanyahu's defiance of world agreement about the building of additional settlements on disputed territory.

Trump's David Duke Amnesia - FactCheck.org





Someone might think Muslims or even Christians are under attack by the disinformation circulating on the internet, but Jews remain at the top of the list for who is targeted most because of their religion.
Hate Crimes — FBI


As far as I can tell, Jews in America have always been the prime target of criminal religious bigotry........but some seem to want Muslims to catch up or that suggest that Christians are somehow feeling anything close to what Jews have felt for centuries.

Even during WWII, there was distrust, perhaps for different reasons, but still there.
The U.S. Government Turned Away Thousands of Jewish Refugees, Fearing That They Were Nazi Spies | History | Smithsonian

Even so, the vast majority of American Jews are not only "liberal", but Democrats.
Jewish American's Social and Political Views
American Jews - Wikipedia

Some people, regardless of their religion (or lack thereof) or nationality, put their human and moral values before money and partisan "winning". They will not sell their souls to promote their group's political agendas, if those agendas are amoral.

Some people seem confused in their consistency regarding what they are for and what they are against and appear to nullify their own desires and positions because of this.


I would also imagine Jews are not alone regarding the current state of affairs in America, versus its past, where and when children could go to school or people could gather, not only in synagogues, but any public place without fear of a an armed "terrorist" of any sort, of any "roots" or behind any "cause", shooting them or bombing them and taking their lives. Many would not have imagined an organization like the more recent NRA that would promote more firearms as a solution to the problem with firearms and act more like a lobby to the arms industry than what their original mission was all about.

Lots of things going on in the U.S. that have changed with regard to conflicts of "freedom" and "rights" and the balances between the costs and benefits, as well as good and evil.

Sadly, it seems to me, we could possibly be wanting the very same things that we do not want when they are directed at us, rather than directed from us.

Perhaps all Americans should ask themselves about what they are fighting for and fighting against and if any of the things they are fighting for, are things they would not want directed at them, even as they support, directing them at others.

Back to the old ethics of reciprocity.
 
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Jun 2013
18,771
16,773
Here
Weird format here with regard to posting. this post should be deleted....but posters have no means to delete duplicates or wrongly placed posts.
I was trying to add to the previous post, not respond to it......
 
Last edited:
Sep 2012
14,771
19,342
SoCal
For Jews, America was once exceptional. Now, anti-Semitism is as strong here as in Europe.
Joshua Safran, Opinion contributor
(You may have to open the link in an incognito window. --IJ)

One of the things I’ve cherished most about being an American is the ability to walk around as a Jew without terrorists actively plotting to kill me. Over the years I’ve taken this freedom for granted, even while recognizing that it’s a luxury and a privilege that arguably only America has been able to provide. As any readily identifiable Jew traveling abroad will tell you, most of the rest of the world is stuck in the Dark Ages by comparison.

...

We American Jews have been left with an understandable sense of American exceptionalism. We come from a free country, a place where you can pray if you want to, wherever you want to, whenever you want to, and no one can or will do anything about it. As Jews, we were guaranteed religious liberty by none other than George Washington, in his 1790 letter to the Jews of Newport, and we danced with the Torah, firm in our faith in the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment. From 1790 to today, American Jews had a good 229 year run of religious freedom.

On Oct. 27, 2018, an accused terrorist shouted, “All Jews must die!” and murdered 11 people, wounding seven more, during Shabbat morning services at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh. Jewish communities across America, including my own in Portland, Oregon, held their breath. Was this a one-off aberration? Or did this portend a new direction for the land of the free?

We received our answer last week on the last day of Passover, when another gunman shot up another synagogue, this time at the Chabad of Poway, near San Diego. According to the accused terrorist's manifesto, he was seeking to send Jews to where they belong, namely, to hell. One murdered and three wounded this time.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The question is not whether it will happen again, but where it will happen next. This is why my synagogue (among many others) has armed guards, and some armed members, for Shabbat and holiday services (which is when the most people are there - during the week, far fewer).

It's sad and shameful that our country, with freedom of religion embodied within the Constitution, should have houses of worship attacked. It's very sad that those houses are put in a position that requires armed security to protect that right, and I am sorry that your synagogue is among those. I have read many excuses of why some people hate Jews, but none of them are real or even sane.

Although I am an Atheist, I respect the right of all to worship as they choose (exception: dangerous cults that prey on confused/lost people) or none, as long as I am not forced to accept their beliefs thru law, which is also embodied in the Constitution. To my knowledge, the Jewish faith does not proselytize or recruit, and I greatly respect that. There are some things that I can appreciate about all religions, and others that repel me. But I still respect the right of those who choose them to be free of fear of harm for their chosen beliefs. During my long life I have had friends of many religions and hope to continue to do so.

(Hope this makes sense as it's somewhat difficult to explain) @Ian Jeffrey
 
Jan 2015
54,169
16,193
Great State of Texas
For Jews, America was once exceptional. Now, anti-Semitism is as strong here as in Europe.
Joshua Safran, Opinion contributor
(You may have to open the link in an incognito window. --IJ)

One of the things I’ve cherished most about being an American is the ability to walk around as a Jew without terrorists actively plotting to kill me. Over the years I’ve taken this freedom for granted, even while recognizing that it’s a luxury and a privilege that arguably only America has been able to provide. As any readily identifiable Jew traveling abroad will tell you, most of the rest of the world is stuck in the Dark Ages by comparison.

...

We American Jews have been left with an understandable sense of American exceptionalism. We come from a free country, a place where you can pray if you want to, wherever you want to, whenever you want to, and no one can or will do anything about it. As Jews, we were guaranteed religious liberty by none other than George Washington, in his 1790 letter to the Jews of Newport, and we danced with the Torah, firm in our faith in the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment. From 1790 to today, American Jews had a good 229 year run of religious freedom.

On Oct. 27, 2018, an accused terrorist shouted, “All Jews must die!” and murdered 11 people, wounding seven more, during Shabbat morning services at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh. Jewish communities across America, including my own in Portland, Oregon, held their breath. Was this a one-off aberration? Or did this portend a new direction for the land of the free?

We received our answer last week on the last day of Passover, when another gunman shot up another synagogue, this time at the Chabad of Poway, near San Diego. According to the accused terrorist's manifesto, he was seeking to send Jews to where they belong, namely, to hell. One murdered and three wounded this time.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The question is not whether it will happen again, but where it will happen next. This is why my synagogue (among many others) has armed guards, and some armed members, for Shabbat and holiday services (which is when the most people are there - during the week, far fewer).
You should be Proud of your efforts ....

Voting for the Party of Anti-Semitism ...

Didn't you accomplish what you wanted by voting Democrat?