France in Turmoil -- The People Rise Up Against Globalism

Mar 2007
31,406
6,091
#31
Or another way of looking at it is that one may love one's country enough to see it prosper, and to see the people rise above the hardships of previous generations. That's how I see paying taxes in my country. I don't like them, but they are necessary to a prosperous state. To one such as I, the attitude of as little taxation as possible comes across as selfish and unpatriotic, but that's my opinion.

However, if taxation becomes onerous, we then see a response similar to that under discussion now.
Charity should be both local and voluntary. When one moves the focus of charity to a huge bureaucracy, every opportunist in sight tries to exploit the flow of money. Study all the charitable functions of the federal government and you will find entrenched users all over the place. This does not mean they are all bad, but the problem is endemic and very hard to root out. The good folks who run these charitable functions have to work their ways around the users, losers and bureaucracy. Did you ever read the ACA legislation? I did. It was a nightmare of conflicting interests and purposes unrelated to health care. The barnacles of a thousand social justice interests were attached to that ship, at least half of which would stick in the craw of even moderate voters.
 
Likes: orangecat
Dec 2014
11,558
8,886
Brisbane, Qld. Australia
#32
Charity should be both local and voluntary. When one moves the focus of charity to a huge bureaucracy, every opportunist in sight tries to exploit the flow of money. Study all the charitable functions of the federal government and you will find entrenched users all over the place. This does not mean they are all bad, but the problem is endemic and very hard to root out. The good folks who run these charitable functions have to work their ways around the users, losers and bureaucracy. Did you ever read the ACA legislation? I did. It was a nightmare of conflicting interests and purposes unrelated to health care. The barnacles of a thousand social justice interests were attached to that ship, at least half of which would stick in the craw of even moderate voters.

I didn't say the system was perfect ( and I have my objections to some taxation such as carbon taxes etc.), but I fail to see how charity could sustain a society as we currently enjoy. Philanthropy can only achieve so much and it is invariably slow to realise any major public works or programmes (see the Roman world for examples).
 
Mar 2007
31,406
6,091
#33
I didn't say the system was perfect ( and I have my objections to some taxation such as carbon taxes etc.), but I fail to see how charity could sustain a society as we currently enjoy. Philanthropy can only achieve so much and it is invariably slow to realise any major public works or programmes (see the Roman world for examples).
Have any suggestions on how we can install competent managers into a system that depends on political paybacks and lying to people about both intentions and negotiations?

The lock-box for social security funding comes to mind. The only option we have with the current system is more spending and debt. It's fundamentally flawed.
 

Babba

Former Staff
Jul 2007
71,204
59,860
So. Md.
#34
I didn't say the system was perfect ( and I have my objections to some taxation such as carbon taxes etc.), but I fail to see how charity could sustain a society as we currently enjoy. Philanthropy can only achieve so much and it is invariably slow to realise any major public works or programmes (see the Roman world for examples).
I've tried to explain this to kmiller before, that private charities were never able to meet the demand and that's why government had to step in - that is if you want a decent civil society.
 
Jul 2013
46,856
49,212
Nashville, TN
#36
Yes, I'm quite familiar with the talking points, as well as the underlying motivations.

After all, I did grow up in the segregated South.
You and me both, brother. I remember walking down the sidewalk with my grandfather and the "coloreds" stepping completely off the sidewalk into the street and dropping their eyes.....I remember the dual water fountains and the white only public restrooms....hate filled racists want to go back to those times...
 
Oct 2009
29,307
22,083
Kansas
#38
Turns out, slapping regressive gasoline taxes on a populace that already pays more for fuel than pretty much every other country is a ... bad idea.

In general, Macron is exactly the wrong kind of leader for this time. Big ideas, arrogant prick.
 
Jul 2013
36,143
22,527
On a happy trail
#39
You and me both, brother. I remember walking down the sidewalk with my grandfather and the "coloreds" stepping completely off the sidewalk into the street and dropping their eyes.....I remember the dual water fountains and the white only public restrooms....hate filled racists want to go back to those times...
I remember when the "colored" section of my SF bay hometown, consisting of mainly single family residences full of mainly black refugees forced off their homesteads in Texas and Oklahoma during the prior two decades, was condemned, bull dozed and developed for light industry in the early sixties. With those who stayed being forced to live in projects.

The only building left standing in that area was the predominantly white Protestant church.

Nothing was ever the same in that town after that.
 
Likes: labrea

Similar Discussions