Fraying at the Edges: Living with Alzheimer's

BDBoop

Former Staff
Dec 2010
46,671
43,466
Twitter
#1
This is a very long read, in fact I am still reading it. Ironic that this popped up in my Facebook feed, what with the conversation we've been having since yesterday.

[HR][/HR]Every 67 seconds, with monotonous cruelty, Alzheimer’s takes up residence in another American. Degenerative and incurable, it is democratic in its reach. People live with it about eight to 10 years on average, though some people last for 20 years. More than five million Americans are believed to have it, two-thirds of them women, and now Ms. Taylor would join them.

The disease, with its thundering implications, moves in worsening stages to its ungraspable end. That is the familiar face of Alzheimer’s, the withered person with the scrambled mind marooned in a nursing home, memories sealed away, aspirations for the future discontinued. But there is also the beginning, the waiting period.

That was Geri Taylor. Waiting.

Right now, she remained energized, in control of her life, the silent attack on her brain not yet in full force. But what about next week? Next month? Next year? The disease would be there then. And the year after. And forever. It has no easy parts. It nicks away at you, its progress messy and unpredictable.

“The beginning is like purgatory,” she said one day. “It’s kind of a grace period. You’re waiting for something. Something you don’t want to come. It’s like a before-hell purgatory.”[HR][/HR]
 
Likes: 3 people
Dec 2007
34,673
6,991
Middle of nowhere Arkansas
#2
This is a very long read, in fact I am still reading it. Ironic that this popped up in my Facebook feed, what with the conversation we've been having since yesterday.

[HR][/HR]Every 67 seconds, with monotonous cruelty, Alzheimer’s takes up residence in another American. Degenerative and incurable, it is democratic in its reach. People live with it about eight to 10 years on average, though some people last for 20 years. More than five million Americans are believed to have it, two-thirds of them women, and now Ms. Taylor would join them.

The disease, with its thundering implications, moves in worsening stages to its ungraspable end. That is the familiar face of Alzheimer’s, the withered person with the scrambled mind marooned in a nursing home, memories sealed away, aspirations for the future discontinued. But there is also the beginning, the waiting period.

That was Geri Taylor. Waiting.

Right now, she remained energized, in control of her life, the silent attack on her brain not yet in full force. But what about next week? Next month? Next year? The disease would be there then. And the year after. And forever. It has no easy parts. It nicks away at you, its progress messy and unpredictable.

“The beginning is like purgatory,” she said one day. “It’s kind of a grace period. You’re waiting for something. Something you don’t want to come. It’s like a before-hell purgatory.”[HR][/HR]
I'm watching the deterioration in my mother's mental acuteness and I'm not very optimistic about the outcome. She's practically a force of nature. She won't listen to anyone, never has.
 
Likes: 1 person

RosieS

Former Staff
Mar 2013
9,260
7,756
Mother Mayo
#3
I was in a Nursing home where they mixed all kinds of patients.

I had three Alzheimer's ladies in a row before they put me in a different room and I got another sane lady put in with me.

After I had a sane roommate I almost enjoyed the stay.

The two things that had the nursing home calling the funeral home were:

1) Alzheimer's

2) diabetes

The out-of-control diabetic rather quickly slides into a coma and passes.

Some diabetics have their coma and passing all overnite and staff finds them gone the next day.

Alzheimer's is a long nightmarish slide.

It is hard on the staff and the other patients but I'm unsure if the Alzheimer's patient even knows they are facing their demise.

I would tend to think not - which is just as well, because it is horrible.

Sincere condolences to those who have relatives so very ill.

Regards from Rosie
 
Likes: 4 people

BDBoop

Former Staff
Dec 2010
46,671
43,466
Twitter
#6
May it continue to do its job.

The article I posted was an amazing read, and actually more like a short story. Very long, but worth the time.
 
Likes: 1 person
Feb 2010
29,438
31,702
Sunny Bournemouth, Dorset
#7
Namenda is a great medicine to help slow the onset once detected. My wife has it.
I had to look it up. I know it as Memantine. It has another brand name in the UK. It's a bit more expensive but a good reliable alternative to the Cholerestinase inhibitors.
 
Likes: 1 person
Oct 2013
14,015
12,604
Sweden
#8
Its a tough disease. My husbands last surviving grandparent is now in a home and has alzheimers (his mother's mother)....his mom just came back from seeing her mom and its hard cause the visits from her daughters seems to upset her...like they create some niggle in her mind that she doesnt like. She asked her oldest daughter "are you my mother"...she seemed to know they are related in the "mother daughter way but got the roles reversed. My mother in law came back from the last visit and I made the mistake of asking how her mother was doing ....my mother in law could only cry, that was answer enough. It was a dumb ass question for me to ask....ugh.
 
Likes: 2 people

BDBoop

Former Staff
Dec 2010
46,671
43,466
Twitter
#9
Its a tough disease. My husbands last surviving grandparent is now in a home and has alzheimers (his mother's mother)....his mom just came back from seeing her mom and its hard cause the visits from her daughters seems to upset her...like they create some niggle in her mind that she doesnt like. She asked her oldest daughter "are you my mother"...she seemed to know they are related in the "mother daughter way but got the roles reversed. My mother in law came back from the last visit and I made the mistake of asking how her mother was doing ....my mother in law could only cry, that was answer enough. It was a dumb ass question for me to ask....ugh.
In the midst of it, we all visited my mom (my sister, her son, his wife and their two, me, my daughter her husband and her (at the time) two.

My sister's granddaughter was an infant at the time. My mom saw the car seat. Her face lit up, she looked at my sister and said "OH! You brought your new baby!!"
 
Likes: 2 people
Mar 2015
6,366
3,363
UK
#10
I'm watching the deterioration in my mother's mental acuteness and I'm not very optimistic about the outcome. She's practically a force of nature. She won't listen to anyone, never has.
one needs to watch 'the deterioration in' one's own 'mental acuteness' for we are as likely to go down with it as any other member of one's family.. age is no barrier Alzheimer's
 
Likes: 1 person

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