Germany losing climate edge

Mar 2012
58,084
39,646
New Hampshire
#1
Was there about two years ago and they were re-opening a lot of coal mines then.

Al Gore said Germany is losing its status as one of the global leaders in combatting climate change as the country continues to depend on burning coal for its energy production.

“Germany was a model for the rest of the world and a narrative took hold here in Germany that might be summarized as ‘Germany leads and everyone follows,’” Gore told POLITICO in an interview. “But that narrative is now out of date.” Angela Merkel’s decision in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima disaster to accelerate Germany’s withdrawal from nuclear energy, which accounted for about one-fifth of its electricity generation, has led the country to burn more coal to make up for the shortfall. The policy shift is the main reason Berlin will miss its 2020 emissions targets under the Kyoto climate accord.

Gore said Germany’s backsliding, particularly on coal, means that other countries — including the Netherlands, France and the Scandinavian nations — are racing ahead of it. “Germany is in danger of being left behind as more aggressive EU governments seize the lead,” he said. “The competitive advantages and job creation advantages of the sustainability revolution put Germany at risk of being left behind. Of course, the subsidies for coal in Germany are enormous.”

https://www.politico.eu/article/al-gore-angela-merkel-climate-warns-germany-losing-climate-edge/
 
Likes: 2 people
Sep 2017
5,469
6,537
Massachusetts
#2
Was there about two years ago and they were re-opening a lot of coal mines then.

Al Gore said Germany is losing its status as one of the global leaders in combatting climate change as the country continues to depend on burning coal for its energy production.

“Germany was a model for the rest of the world and a narrative took hold here in Germany that might be summarized as ‘Germany leads and everyone follows,’” Gore told POLITICO in an interview. “But that narrative is now out of date.” Angela Merkel’s decision in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima disaster to accelerate Germany’s withdrawal from nuclear energy, which accounted for about one-fifth of its electricity generation, has led the country to burn more coal to make up for the shortfall. The policy shift is the main reason Berlin will miss its 2020 emissions targets under the Kyoto climate accord.

Gore said Germany’s backsliding, particularly on coal, means that other countries — including the Netherlands, France and the Scandinavian nations — are racing ahead of it. “Germany is in danger of being left behind as more aggressive EU governments seize the lead,” he said. “The competitive advantages and job creation advantages of the sustainability revolution put Germany at risk of being left behind. Of course, the subsidies for coal in Germany are enormous.”

https://www.politico.eu/article/al-gore-angela-merkel-climate-warns-germany-losing-climate-edge/
I thought Germany was making a huge error by pulling out of nuclear when they did. However, even with "backsliding" on coal, they're doing very well relative to the US. As of 2014, at least (the most recent data I have), they had a per capita carbon footprint of 8.9 metric tons. We're at 16.5.
 
Nov 2013
11,341
11,214
NY
#3
just today there's an article in German magazine Spiegel, for the first time renewable energy was the biggest contributor to German electricity production in the first half of 2018.
36 % was produced from renewable energy sources.

Coal was used for 26 %, both brown and dark coal.

And this Friday the energy commission in Germnay will meet to determine the phase out date for the last coal plant.

It's a marathon, not a sprint, and Germany is apparently still leading the way, even if they ramped up coal in the interims when they had to politically decide the nuclear phase out in light of Fukushima (as demanded by the German electorate).
 
Likes: 3 people
Sep 2017
5,469
6,537
Massachusetts
#4
just today there's an article in German magazine Spiegel, for the first time renewable energy was the biggest contributor to German electricity production in the first half of 2018.
36 % was produced from renewable energy sources.

Coal was used for 26 %, both brown and dark coal.

And this Friday the energy commission in Germnay will meet to determine the phase out date for the last coal plant.

It's a marathon, not a sprint, and Germany is apparently still leading the way, even if they ramped up coal in the interims when they had to politically decide the nuclear phase out in light of Fukushima (as demanded by the German electorate).
I think they'd be in a better state if, like some European countries, they hadn't had an irrational panic about nuclear. As good as Germany's carbon numbers are relative to the US, they're not good relative to several other European countries, including France.
 
Apr 2015
15,414
2,895
Katmandu
#5
just today there's an article in German magazine Spiegel, for the first time renewable energy was the biggest contributor to German electricity production in the first half of 2018.
36 % was produced from renewable energy sources.

Coal was used for 26 %, both brown and dark coal.

And this Friday the energy commission in Germnay will meet to determine the phase out date for the last coal plant.

It's a marathon, not a sprint, and Germany is apparently still leading the way, even if they ramped up coal in the interims when they had to politically decide the nuclear phase out in light of Fukushima (as demanded by the German electorate).
And that's why Germans pay 380% more for electricity and I do.
 
Likes: 2 people
Jun 2014
61,627
35,976
Cleveland, Ohio
#6
Was there about two years ago and they were re-opening a lot of coal mines then.

Al Gore said Germany is losing its status as one of the global leaders in combatting climate change as the country continues to depend on burning coal for its energy production.

“Germany was a model for the rest of the world and a narrative took hold here in Germany that might be summarized as ‘Germany leads and everyone follows,’” Gore told POLITICO in an interview. “But that narrative is now out of date.” Angela Merkel’s decision in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima disaster to accelerate Germany’s withdrawal from nuclear energy, which accounted for about one-fifth of its electricity generation, has led the country to burn more coal to make up for the shortfall. The policy shift is the main reason Berlin will miss its 2020 emissions targets under the Kyoto climate accord.

Gore said Germany’s backsliding, particularly on coal, means that other countries — including the Netherlands, France and the Scandinavian nations — are racing ahead of it. “Germany is in danger of being left behind as more aggressive EU governments seize the lead,” he said. “The competitive advantages and job creation advantages of the sustainability revolution put Germany at risk of being left behind. Of course, the subsidies for coal in Germany are enormous.”

https://www.politico.eu/article/al-gore-angela-merkel-climate-warns-germany-losing-climate-edge/
Crappy environmental policies.

Disappointing, coming from Germany.
 
Apr 2012
10,688
4,390
East coast USA
#7
Nuclear is both good and bad. Building one is very expensive, and they need a big water source for cooling. As you can see in Japan, uninterrupted power has to be used to pump coolant. No power, pump stop, overheat, explosion.
Trying to find a suitable place to build is imperative.

Do not let the Chinese build anything- tip for the day
 
Nov 2013
11,341
11,214
NY
#8
And that's why Germans pay 380% more for electricity and I do.
Yes they do. For some reason, Germans think it's worth it to have a planet for future generations. They're weird that way.

A good amount pays even MORE than that, voluntarily, electing ONLY renewable sources for their electricity.

They also recycle, can you believe it ?
 
Nov 2013
11,341
11,214
NY
#9
I think they'd be in a better state if, like some European countries, they hadn't had an irrational panic about nuclear. As good as Germany's carbon numbers are relative to the US, they're not good relative to several other European countries, including France.
Irrational, lies in the eye of the viewer.
Germany has been pretty close to Chernobyl back in the days, we've had to watch sourcing of produce for years, changing habits and getting used to shifted supplies based on the radioactive fallout coming from Chernobyl.

Having lived through this, and then having seen the massive impact that Fukushima had in Japan... there was a big public demand (nuclear was always controversial in Germany, huge protests back in the 70's and 80's that i can remember), Which Merkel was jumping on asap at the time, with the green party being a strong force in Germany for the longest time now...
By now the timeline for the full phase out has been watered down drastically already again anyways.
 
Apr 2012
60,360
45,527
Englewood,Ohio
#10

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